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Yesterday I bought a small pouch of Deep Foods' Dry Garlic Chutney. It is hot and garlicky and kind of dry and crumbly in texture. I would like to try this on my own. Anyone out there care to share a reciepe?

Edited by BBhasin (log)

Bombay Curry Company

3110 Mount Vernon Avenue, Alexandria, VA 22305. 703. 836-6363

Delhi Club

Arlington, Virginia

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I just got to this thread -- wow -- what a demand. Guys I am no great chef -- a very simple food writer and the recipe is my mom inlaws very very simple recipe. I am sure others here have much greater and complex recipes to add. Here is my garlic chutney 101 -- vary as you see appropriate

Dry Garlic Chutney (Lahsun Ki Chutney)

This keeps well in the refrigerator for up to a week.

1 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut

12 fresh garlic cloves, peeled

1 teaspoon red chili powder

Table salt to taste

1. In a medium skillet, roast the coconut and the garlic for about 3–4 minutes, on low heat. The coconut and the garlic will begin to darken and release their aroma. Remove from heat and allow to cool down for about 10 minutes.

2. Transfer the mixture to a blender, add the red chili and salt. Blend until you have a coarse powder.

3.. Transfer to a container. Refrigerate covered until needed

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Dry Garlic Chutney (Lahsun Ki Chutney)

This keeps well in the refrigerator for up to a week.

1 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut

12 fresh garlic cloves, peeled

1 teaspoon red chili powder

Table salt to taste

Finally!!! Thanks for the recipe.

Monica:

I did try similar version after all the wait I went thru waiting for your private email. Actually Bhasin had emailed me the similar recipe except he had peanuts and sesame added to that.

I tried Bhasin's verion and found it not that dry. I thought the coconut and Garlic had moisture which gave me a lumpy chutney. Did I do any thing wrong?

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Dry Garlic Chutney (Lahsun Ki Chutney)

This keeps well in the refrigerator for up to a week.

1 cup unsweetened desiccated coconut

12 fresh garlic cloves, peeled

1 teaspoon red chili powder

Table salt to taste

Finally!!! Thanks for the recipe.

Monica:

I did try similar version after all the wait I went thru waiting for your private email. Actually Bhasin had emailed me the similar recipe except he had peanuts and sesame added to that.

I tried Bhasin's verion and found it not that dry. I thought the coconut and Garlic had moisture which gave me a lumpy chutney. Did I do any thing wrong?

hmmmm-- did you roast it for long enough.. that should pull out the moisture a lot.. It is not completely dry -- just a tad bit moist. but should not be lumpy.. Sorry about the delay -- i missed the requests totally!!! My mom inlaw does not add peanuts or sesame.. I guess it is all to taste. They like theirs very "garlicky" :smile:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Did I do any thing wrong?

hmmmm-- did you roast it for long enough.. that should pull out the moisture a lot.. It is not completely dry -- just a tad bit moist. but should not be lumpy.. Sorry about the delay -- i missed the requests totally!!! My mom inlaw does not add peanuts or sesame.. I guess it is all to taste. They like theirs very "garlicky" :smile:

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I just got to this thread -- wow -- what a demand. Guys I am no great chef -- a very simple food writer and the recipe is my mom inlaws very very simple recipe. I am sure others here have much greater and complex recipes to add. Here is my garlic chutney 101 -- vary as you see appropriate.

You are being modest or fishing for compliments. :smile:

Thanks for the recipe Monica.

I shall try and cook it sometime this month.

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There's a garlic-methi (fenugreek) version of this which is my standard solution to boring food. Its dry and keeps very well, so I always have a jar in office and have even travelled with it, to use when things are getting too bland. Don't have a recipe for it though, since its so readily available here in Bombay,

Vikram

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Vikram: By fenugreek, I presume you mean the seeds? The herb would seem unusual (to me anyway). Can't wait to try it.

My mother makes two kinds of garlic chutney: Wet and Dry. In both cases the garlic is sauteed gently in ghee (oil will not give you the same flavour) until golden, removed from the ghee and cooled. It is then ground with roasted coconut, roasted red chillies, tamarind and salt. The only difference between the two chutneys is that you do not overprocess if you need it dry. Garlic is a very sticky thing, so it will make everything clump together. Just add more water and grind to a finer paste if you like your chutney wet.

I love garlic, so I can't wait to try all the versions mentioned here.

Suman

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There's a garlic-methi (fenugreek) version of this which is my standard solution to boring food. Its dry and keeps very well, so I always have a jar in office and have even travelled with it, to use when things are getting too bland. Don't have a recipe for it though, since its so readily available here in Bombay,

Vikram

Sounds interesting Vikram. I would like to try it out. Any tips on how best to prepare it

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Vikram: By fenugreek, I presume you mean the seeds? The herb would seem unusual (to me anyway). Can't wait to try it.

My mother makes two kinds of garlic chutney: Wet and Dry. In both cases the garlic is sauteed gently in ghee (oil will not give you the same flavour) until golden, removed from the ghee and cooled. It is then ground with roasted coconut, roasted red chillies, tamarind and salt. The only difference between the two chutneys is that you do not overprocess if you need it dry. Garlic is a very sticky thing, so it will make everything clump together. Just add more water and grind to a finer paste if you like your chutney wet.

I love garlic, so I can't wait to try all the versions mentioned here.

Suman

Suman -- I must try your grandmother's version. I tend to dry roast mine. I can see ghee adding a lovely flavor

Thanks

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Some time back I had attended a friend's wedding in Jaipur. I took the opportunity to visit Jaisalmer as the dates coincided with the Desert festival-first full moon in February.

Jaisalmer is a place out of a movie set and should be on everyone's must visit list. I checked into a hotel and scouted around to hire a camel for a 3 day trip in the desert. I was told by the agency that a deluxe tour would cost me Rs. 300 a day and the standard would cost Rs. 200 a day. This was inclusive of a guide/camel driver, breakfast, lunch, tea and dinner. The deluxe breakfast, I was told, would consist of eggs made to order, tea/coffee, muesli and toast with butter/jam, all cooked by the camel driver. Horrified at the prospect of eating this in the middle of the desert I cut him short before he described the rest of the meals. Do you have anything cheaper, I asked. He sized me up disapprovingly and said they had something for Rs. 100 a day, but the food would be very spartan. He went on to moan that Indian tourists like me dont spend enough money and Rs. 100 would entail the camel driver to share his food with me.

I jumped at it and there began my most memorable journey which had superb food, a ghost town, a mean tempered camel and the world's fastest bar thrown in. All enough for a novella.

But I'll come back to the Chatni, my camel driver had this ball wrapped up in newspaper from which he would pluck out a bit and add it to the food. Even after giving weightage to the full moon( and rotgut moonshine!) and a sea of sand, it was simply the most amazing Garlic Chatni I'd ever had!

Unfortunately due to language problems our conversation was restricted to the essentials. Coming back to Jaipur I did some research on this Chatni and after experimenting in my Bombay kitchen, this is how I think it goes:

4 pcs. dried kachri( A wild gherkin like cucurbit )

1 head garlic peeled

1 tsp aniseed powder

4 whole red chillis( or whatever quantity and Scovilles turns you on)

salt to taste

Dry roast the kachris and red chillis. Grind everything together in a coffee/spice grinder and store in a jar( tight lid) in the fridge.

Wait till you get the urge, let this garlic chatni jar summon you from the fridge

and remember me.

Warning: Frequent consumption can lead to failed marriages. Can also be used as a substitute for " Not tonight dear, I have a headache".

Edited by Episure (log)

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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