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jhlurie

Sichuan Peppercorn

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Florida may be big in agriculture, but it's not the fourth largest state by area. That would be --ahem--Montana.

#1Alaska:656,425 sq. miles

#2Texas:268,601 sq. miles

#3California:163,707 sq. miles

#4Montana:147,046 sq. miles

#22: Florida:65,758 sq. miles

Not a lot of citrus plants in MT, though ;-)

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That's true, but there's a surprising amount of fruits and nuts considering there's more cows than people! :smile:

Edit to add: also, I read that just as it read; that ag. was second business, and Florida was the fourth largest state. Oops.


Edited by Mabelline (log)

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Probably what Robyn would have meant is that Florida is the 4th most populous state in the Union, not 4th largest in area. Without checking, I figure the most populous states in order are California, Texas, New York, Florida, and then Illinois. Was I right?

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Probably what Robyn would have meant is that Florida is the 4th most populous state in the Union, not 4th largest in area. Without checking, I figure the most populous states in order are California, Texas, New York, Florida, and then Illinois. Was I right?

You're right that I meant population - not size. And you're right about the top 5 states. Robyn

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Florida may be big in agriculture, but it's not the fourth largest state by area. That would be --ahem--Montana.

  #1Alaska:656,425 sq. miles

  #2Texas:268,601 sq. miles

  #3California:163,707 sq. miles

  #4Montana:147,046 sq. miles

  #22: Florida:65,758 sq. miles

Not a lot of citrus plants in MT, though ;-)

I wonder if there is ONE citrus plant in Montana?


Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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Oh, my yes, at least in our apartment. I have at present 14 lemons of differing sizes and ages, all started from seeds I put into the soil in my plants. And three avacadoes, including one haas from seed , which sprouted true, as it is enormous.


Edited by Mabelline (log)

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I wonder if there is ONE citrus plant in Montana?
Oh, my yes, at least in our apartment. I have at present 14 lemons of differing sizes and ages, all started from seeds I put into the soil in my plants. And three avacadoes, including one haas from seed , which sprouted true, as it is enormous.

Mabelline, I'm impressed that you've actually succeeded in getting citrus seeds to germinate. I've tried several times without success. Any tricks to this? Maybe they would apply to planting Sichuan pepper plants as well.

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edsel, that's the weird thing about it-- I don't do anything to them beside letting them dry, then poking them down a scant 1/2 inch in a pot with an established plant and then forget about them. Water the plant as usual, and sooner or later you'll look someday when you're watering and oops, there are baby trees. I use so many lemons that I had to cut it out because there's too many to take care of in the apartment. The oldest ones are 4 1/2 feet tall now. But now I feel bad throwing away all those babies (seeds). My haas avocado took a year to germinate.

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Late-breaking news on the war against citrus canker can be found here.

In a sweeping victory for the citrus industry, Florida's Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the controversial law that allows state canker-eradication crews on to homeowners' properties to destroy seemingly healthy trees

I can only hope that while on property they also inspect the spice cabinet for those pesky peppercorns. :hmmm::wink::angry:

PJ


Edited by pjs (log)

"Epater les bourgeois."

--Lester Bangs via Bruce Sterling

(Dori Bangs)

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edsel, that's the weird thing about it-- I don't do anything to them beside letting them dry, then poking them down a scant 1/2 inch in a pot with an established plant and then forget about them. Water the plant as usual, and sooner or later you'll look someday when you're watering and oops, there are baby trees. I use so many lemons that I had to cut it out because there's too many to take care of in the apartment. The oldest ones are 4 1/2 feet tall now. But now I feel bad throwing away all those babies (seeds). My haas avocado took a year to germinate.

You're producing edible fruit in an apartment? That's unusual. Robyn

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Late-breaking news on the war against citrus canker can be found here.
In a sweeping victory for the citrus industry, Florida's Supreme Court on Thursday upheld the controversial law that allows state canker-eradication crews on to homeowners' properties to destroy seemingly healthy trees

I can only hope that while on property they also inspect the spice cabinet for those pesky peppercorns. :hmmm::wink::angry:

PJ

I can't believe this story wasn't in the local papers. Someone must have been asleep at the switch. Thanks for the link. Robyn

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I never said I was producing any fruit in an apartment, but it is very possible. The only thing you need to do is your own pollenization. But seed-grown citrus is iffy at best, and I only grew these because I had so many seeds all the time. I keep cutting these seedlings back so they'll stouten up.

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I never said I was producing any fruit in an apartment, but it is very possible. The only thing you need to do is your own pollenization. But seed-grown citrus is iffy at best, and I only grew these because I had so many seeds all the time. I keep cutting these seedlings back so they'll stouten up.

OK - I was just picturing this apartment full of bees and you in a beekeeper's bonnet :smile: . Robyn

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Well, SO has been known to accuse me of keeping my bees there, but I don't even own any bonnets :laugh:

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I never said I was producing any fruit in an apartment, but it is very possible. The only thing you need to do is your own pollenization. But seed-grown citrus is iffy at best, and I only grew these because I had so many seeds all the time. I keep cutting these seedlings back so they'll stouten up.

That's really cool, Mabelline.

I've got three avocado trees in my house. One was over seven feet tall before I accidentally decapitated it bringing it in for the winter. :shock: It's five feet now, and looking less resentful by the day.

I have a long-standing fantasy of growing tropical fruit indoors. (I live in Ohio). Whenever I visit places like Arizona or California I'm always jealous of the beautiful fruit trees.

Anyhoo, I think we should all start growing Sichuan peppercorns in defiance of the USDA bureaucrats. :biggrin:

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I have only one caution about avocados. Although it's probably a moot warning to the majority of people, please be aware that avocado leaves are toxic to horses and sometimes donkies. I realize that's a stupid warning for 99.6 percent of eGers, but I'm thinking of maybe that one person it might do some good for.Some folks are into those mini critters, and they would definitely be a candidate for munching off a tubbed avocado.

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I'm thinking of maybe that one person it might do some good for.

I've heard of eGulleteers keeping chickens, but horses?

My dear departed cat Lila was known to savagely attack the lemon-grass plants. No ill effect other than the little "gifts" of sodden, chewed-up grass pulp she used to leave on the couch underneath the windowsill where the herbs are growing. :shock:

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Anyone notice that the guest chef 's recipe on Ming's show today called for szechuan peppercorns?

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:sad: Boo. MT PBS does not carry it yet, and I have e'med them to distraction.

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After trying for the past few weeks and only getting error messages, I was able to download the AHPIS Miscellaneous Manual tonight. Finally, a direct mention of Szechuan Peppercorns was found in a footnote.

"Szechuan Pepper may contain stems or floral parts."

The subsequent instruction is to REFUSE ENTRY.

You can find it in the PDF of the Miscellaneous Manual here. The page number is 73.

PJ

PS Ming's PBS show--and his mom who has appeared on it--rocks.


Edited by pjs (log)

"Epater les bourgeois."

--Lester Bangs via Bruce Sterling

(Dori Bangs)

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There is sichuan pepper to be found in the States. About a month ago, I sent a message to my family along w/ MT's brining recipe (fantastic for turkey, then prepared Peking duck style). Two weekends ago, 3 LBS showed up at my door! It was only $7 a lb, incredibly fragrant. St. Louis of all places.

I can't wait to make suan la chao shao this weekend.

Pam

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I'm just trying to see if I can get the seeds to germinate, not necessarily to plant, so I placed them in-between sheets of moistened paper toweling and have been keeping them moist, but nothing is happening. I've have lots more seeds, so if you have a better method of germinating let me know.

PJ

PJ,

Did you ever get any of the seeds to germinate?

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I'm just trying to see if I can get the seeds to germinate, not necessarily to plant, so I placed them in-between sheets of moistened paper toweling and have been keeping them moist, but nothing is happening. I've have lots more seeds, so if you have a better method of germinating let me know.

PJ

PJ,

Did you ever get any of the seeds to germinate?

Nope, they just deteriorated. As others have mentioned these seeds apparently need a cold spell and a scoring of the shell to encourage growth. If you're not familar with these seeds they resemble 1mm dia. bowling balls. I'm really good, due to a past profession, with a 12x magnifier and an X-Acto knife so I may try scoring some. Stay tuned. . . :biggrin:

PJ


"Epater les bourgeois."

--Lester Bangs via Bruce Sterling

(Dori Bangs)

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Somewhat more on-topic: I've been using these peppercorns for years but am nearing the end of my current (I believe) Penzey's-supplied cache. There is an enormous range of Asian markets here in Atlanta, and somebody, somewhere, has got to have some more for me! I'll post if and when I find them.

Bob

Briarhill, i also live in atlanta, and was wondering if you're found any place to get peppercorns in all of our asian markets? You're right there are so many, there must be one that has them for us!!!!

let me know if you find any!

jason

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