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cabrales

La Regalade, Paris

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I forget to mention that the Val de Grace church/chapel was renovated not so long ago as well as its adjacent Medical History "Museum" which contains fabulous paintings of medical scenes from the Napoleonic wars etc and the whole place plus the grounds are wonderful. I got in because of a reception but I think anyone can wrangle their entry if persistent.


John Talbott

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Ah well.  I either do or don't have a dinner reservation at a restaurant that may or may not serve dinner,  and the chef may be there or not. It won't be the first time that one of my misadventures turned out wonderfully or horribly  :biggrin:  I shall report to L'Ourcine on time and see what happens.

In spite of all this communication, and in spite of a second call from the U.S. to confirm the reservation for "Lundi, 5 Avril a vingt heures", L'Ourcine is closed on Monday :hmmm:

All's well that ends well, though. We had a very nice emergency dinner for 73 euros (for two: amuse, entree, plat, fromage, dessert, vin inclus) at Le Cotage Marcadet near our hotel in Montmartre. We talked food with the owner, Jean Marie Robin, until the wee hours of the morning and he's taking us out to Rungis on our next visit.

Got in late last night and have to work today :angry: but will post details about our various dining experiences in the appropriate threads (Le Violon, Mon Vieil Ami, Clos de Gourmets and others.)

:smile:

Jamie


Edited by picaman (log)

See! Antony, that revels long o' nights,

Is notwithstanding up.

Julius Caesar, Act II, Scene ii

biowebsite

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I would like to go to the Regalade one last time before Yves leaves. Does anyone know if his final day has come yet?


Edited by raisab (log)

Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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Hard to know; the piece I posted a while back (March 16th) ( http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=29006&st=0 ) noted that Francois Simon said that it would be the first days of May and the 5/5/04 Bonjour Paris ( http://www.bonjourparis.com/pages/articles/articleId/1276 ) says

"Yves Camdeborde....has [past tense] hung up his coppers..."

Why not telephone?


John Talbott

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I was there just over a week ago, and he was gone already.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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April 27th, 2004

I had a bit of time before my afternoon meeting, so I skipped out to La Régalade to check out the new chef. I had no reservation but I made sure to get there right at noon to ensure a seat.

The service at la Régalade was as unnecessarily harried as ever. The place was not even half full when I arrived, but the two waitresses flew about the place as though they were on wings, well, or on some kind of pharmaceuticals. Yet, the service and the food were so slow my two-hour window was not even enough to finish my lunch.

I must admit that I had not been happy with La Régalade for a long time. When the new crop of bistro nouveaux, like La Régalade, La Repaire de Cartouche, L’Os à Moelle, and Chez Michel first opened in the early 90’s, La Régalade was my favorite. The chef was clearly more talented than the rest. However, I found La Régalade to have deteriorated badly over the years. In fact, the last meal I had there was over a year ago. That meal was so bad, and the service even worse, that I vowed not to return again.

When I heard that the chef was leaving because of exhaustion, it didn’t come at all as a surprise for me. I have been seeing it in his cooking for a while.

Anyhow, since I was free for lunch not too far from the neighbourhood, and I was definitely curious about the new chef who reportedly had a pretty good pedigree, I decided to pop in for lunch.

Even with the room only half full, the waitress took at least 15-20 mins to get to me for my order. I order the menu coup de coeur, starting with Bisque crémeuse de Homard et petit crouton (Lobster bisque with croutons), and a Carré de cochon fermes, échalottes confites (pork loin with shallot confite). For dessert I was tempted by the peach ice cream that was on the menu coup de Coeur, but decided it was too early in the season for peaches, and opted instead for Fraises garriguette de Provence, sorbet lait menthe (garriguette strawberries from Provence and milk/mint ice cream).

After my order was taken, a terrine landed with a big thud on my table. It was the famous paté de campagne “La Régalade”. It was as good as ever, perfect chunky texture, with plenty of flavorful fat dotted throughout. I remember the first time I was there, I had to be physically restraint from eating up the whole terrine before my meal arrived.

My first course, Bisque crémeuse de Homard et petit crouton, took its time arriving, but I was far too happy digging into the terrine to care. Finally, the soup plate arrived with bits of partially cooked lobsters, a few chunks of bacon and plenty of chopped chives. A small Staub pot arrived shortly thereafter, half filled with flavorful soup. The soup was delicious, but, unfortunately, the lobster itself was not so fresh. A few pieces of lobster were completely rare. If they were intended to be partially cooked by the soup, then the liquid was simply not hot enough to do the job. The rare bits tasted even worse than the somewhat cooked ones, and I ended up leaving most of the meat in the bowl. I was really missing the terrine then, I’d much rather be eating the terrine still.

The next course also took its time to arrive. I literally had to tell the waitress that I only had 30 minutes left for my meal. I arrived at 12, and was seated promptly, but it wasn’t until almost 1.30 that my second course finally arrived. It was the Carré de cochon fermes, échalottes confites. The huge slab of pork was perfectly cooked, the meat very tender, and the crackling simply perfect. There was also a small green salad, and another small staub cocotte of mashed potato flavored with mustard. The salad was inoffensive enough, but the mashed potato was slightly oddly flavored, and I am normally such a fan of mustard. Unfortunately, I only had about ten minutes to actually eat my food, and barely finished half before I had to leave.

I told the waitress to bring my dessert immediately, as I am expected back at my hotel at 2pm for a meeting. I took a few bites of the dessert before I ran. The strawberries were no so sweet and weren’t quite fully ripe. The ice cream tasted pretty benign as well, I couldn’t taste much of the milk or the mint, to be honest. But then again that could perhaps be because I only had a minute or two for it before I literally bolted from the place, jumped in front of the first taxi I saw, and told him there will be 10 euros tip for him if he could get me back to the hotel in 15 mins. Happily, he did, so I was only a few minutes late.

The bottom line, this lunch has done little to win me back as a fan of La Régalade. The food was good, but I could get far better food at La Repaire de Cartouche or L’Entredgeu, where the service was also far better. I love the signature terrine, but it will have to take far more than that to bring me back there.

Photos are on chez Pim


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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Yesterdays Figaroscope is the first place I've seen a review of La Régalade, which so many eGulleteers liked so much under Yves Camdeborde's direction. It gave it 3 hearts and describes Bruno Doucet as a young and impeccable successor. It says the restaurant retains the same colorfulness, same need for advance reservations and same bistrot "esprit." Plus the menu-carte at 30E with supplements. More in the digest soon.


John Talbott

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Good review in Figaroscope. I do doubt that tables remain as difficult to obtain as before, but will relish trying this address again, since I really loathed the ambience of the original room. Let's hope that most tourists will follow "le chef" and leave his old kitchen to the neighborhood.


eGullet member #80.

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To follow the Yves Camdeborde saga, Rosa Jackson in this month's Paris Bites repeats what we've heard elsewhere already, that he'll open "very soon" (well, we all know what that means in French, normalement = forever) a small hotel, open to the public only at lunch, and to guests in the evening, with an open kitchen, a visible chef, etc etc, but without changes in his style. But more on that in this week's Digest.


John Talbott

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It's been said that since chef Yves Camdeborde's departure, La Regalade is not what it used to be. Well, this just in -- standards have slipped even further.

I had my third meal at La Regalade a few days ago -- the other two, also post-Yves, were quite wonderful -- and discovered, to my dismay, that the same dishes I had come to anticipate, were barely recognizable:

The royale of foie gras with veloute of puy lentils had no trace of foie gras in either texture, taste or aroma, (it was but an egg flan that was as flavourful as styrofoam) and the lentil broth, unlike its previous pale green incarnation, was instead a turbid brown.

The day's 'coup de coeur' entree of half-cooked, half-raw tuna was more cooked than raw. Likewise for the leg of lamb (gigot d'agneau) which was a little on the well-done side.

The cherry clafoutis was another overcooked blunder -- the batter so rubbery it nearly bounced off the teeth.

To be fair, one main course -- the roast pigeon -- was still superbly executed. But, is one dish worth a two-month wait? Is it worth the trek to the 14th arrondissement? Not anymore.

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Hey Jennifer! Told ya. :biggrin: Of course my suspicions are always raised about any dining establishment that cannot accomodate my dog. I mean they're a BISTRO. And yes - in the 14th at that.

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I love this place. In my experience it's as close as you can get to feeling like Paris while remaining in YVR, although the travel time from Richmond is close to the same. Terrific value combined with Parisan (lack of) portion control ensure you leave happy.

The food is super traditional french bistro/brasserie, don't expect anything to be towered, except maybe the empty dishes on your table. The cooking is homey, and I don't mean that in a derogatory manner, dishes are prepared in a simple manner, a style easily recreated but with hearty generousity typical of the Gauls.

We were last there two weeks ago. My wife ordered, not in some kinky role reversal game, but because she demanded more dishes than she could eat and thus I was expected to share half of them. Started with Moules Marnieres and then the house terrine. The mussels were fatter than a female Hungarian olympic weightlifter, perfectely cooked, incredibly tender. Served in a cast iron pot swimming in insane amouts of butter/creme/white wine etc. Terrine was thick sliced at the table straight out of the crock, served with a trio of condiments in a little server dish last seen at the Keg circa '78 holding sourcream/chives/bacion bits. It contained traditional mustard, gherkins and a sweet red onion relish.

If the decision was left to me, I'd have had the Herring and potatoes to start. Brasserie classic, marinated herring served on a lightly dressed potato salad. So simple, so good. But what I want was vetoed, much like my requisitions for big screen TV's, new golf clubs etc.

Onto the mains, Mrs. Talent had the seven hour roast lamb, I had the veal cheeks. Both were served in La Cruset enameled dishes, portions more than adequate to share, but we're both gluttons so that didn't happen. The lamb was as tender as lamb cooked for as long as the trip to West Van takes. My veal was excellent. Served on top of zucchini in a fresh tomato sauce.

Sides came late after the bulk of the meal had been eaten, tomatoes gratin and potatoes gratin. Agian more cream/butter than a sane person would consume.

I was too full for desert or cheese, Mrs. had something that was neither iles flotant or the superb looking fig tart, so I didn't pay much attention. I dunno, it was probably good, some kind of chocolate thing. I basicly hate chocolates popularity, it's the Hawaii of desert ingredients ie. shows zero imagination.

Two ediocre espressos to follow. (Wow! Total shock, shitty espresso in a Vancouver restaurant! Still better than the Folgers crystals I had served to me in a demitasse cup at Milestones yesterday.)

Drank a rhone with dinner.

Dinner, tax, tip, desert, wine - $150.00 Seems like a deal in my book.

My only complaints, the wine list could show a touch more imagination. Okay alot more. It reads like the french wine shelf in a shitty suburban LDB store, stuff you've had a million times previously, nothing that interesting. Markups are double plus a couple bucks, which I think is fair.

The place is slightly shoddy in appearance, nothing a little dusting couldn't remedy. Packed full of some of the funniest self-absorbed West Van residents you'll ever see. Some cat pulls up in an orgasmically gorgeous new Aston, every table in the place summon their waiter to go take a look at the reservation book to find out who it is. Place is like Mayberry with cash.

So, anyone else like this place?

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Place is like Mayberry with cash.
:biggrin::biggrin:

I had the Pate Maison when I was there. Nice big portion. Could not finish it as I had dinner coming as well.

I sat in the little booth that looks right into the kitchen / dishpit where I could see the floor as well. It does not bother me but I think it could have used a good

" dusting " as well.

Neil


Neil Wyles

Hamilton Street Grill

www.hamiltonstreetgrill.com

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The floor......I agree....I slipped on it actually.

But the food was a truly fabulous French display of well done reductions.

My Coq au Vin only had about 5 tablespoons of sauce in the bottom of the dish (with slightly over cooked chicken), but I would order it solely to savour the five tablespoons of intense flavour anytime. Well done!

Note to first timers.....entree portions are very big...save room for dessert.

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I called L'O this morning and booked for this Friday night on the basis of Figaroscope's three heart review.

Margaret,

You never posted your thoughts on Oursine....

I've booked for this Saturday and wanted to see if any one else has tried it besides John.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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OK; yesterday's Figaroscope has no real news about the opening of Yves Camdeborde's new venture, indeed it deepens the "suspense" as they put it except to repeat the info that it'll be a pension de famille opening at the end of the year; where, who knows?


John Talbott

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In the 15th.


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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Yves new venture will only be open for non guests at lunch while dinner is specifically for in house guests.

Very interesting.

And for anyone wondering about L'ourcine, I was there back in April and it was magnificent. I don't have my notes here in front but if it is still as wonderful, you are in for a great meal at an incredible price. He gets everything right, balance of flavours, textures, interesting meats and fish. As well as wonderful dessert. And they serve absinthe with the sugar and spoon!

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And for anyone wondering about L'ourcine, I was there back in April

I went to both La Regalade and L'Ourcine (where I had a spectacular pigeon) in the same week, two weeks ago and both were just fine. They're on my list for repeats. Remember, we've got until Oct or so until Gourmet blows L'Ourcine's cover. To repeat myself, but since someone, somewhere was wondering about the types of dishes served now at La Regalade; I had the usual amuse gueule of a terrine de campagne on wonderful bread, followed by a generous piece of foie gras swimming in a cream whipped up à la Detourbe with girolles; then a piece of veal liver from Corréze with what was understatedly called parsley butter accompanied by tiny shaved and fried Belles de Fontinet (?sp) potatoes and an exquisite salad of tiny greens; topped off by a Grand Marnier soufflé.


John Talbott

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Margaret, does that mean you love it or hate it?

Forgive my lack of control, Robert. It was the cry of a devotee mourning that this tiny gem will soon be pressured well beyond its capacity. The sad part is that many people will flock there only to be disappointed by the postage-stamp size, well-meant but barely adequate service, single nightly service which will pressure reservations to the absurd. The food is not mannered nor haute, just very, very good neo-bistro plates currently enjoyed almost exclusively by locals.

With the delivery of October Gourmet, "there goes the neighborhood". :blink: This little room can't weather the popularity of a multiple-seating operation like La Regalade.


eGullet member #80.

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But surely by that time everyone will be onto the next "in" Parisian bistro...


Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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