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Felice

L'Entredgeu

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I've been reading a lot about this tiny bistro in the 17th lately and was wondering if anyone had tried it. It was written up in an overview of new restaurants in last week's Figaroscope and received the second highest rating.

I believe that the chef was formerly at Chez Michels.

Here's the address in case you're interested:

83, rue Laugier, 17th.

Open Tuesday-Saturday 12-2, 8-10h15

Menu for 28 €


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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A couple of weeks ago we were in Paris and read in the July/August "Saveurs" about a new restaurant, which we were relieved to find open in August. Its "table du mois","L'Entredgeu" (don't try to translate it; it's a fractured pun in French) was also heralded recently in Le Figaro, and is the baby of a chef formerly employed by Thierry Breton at "Michel" and neighboring "Casimir" and the hostess at Joel Robuchon and Alain Ducase. This duo has opened a very pleasant bistrot in the 17th just steps from the Porte de Champeret metro and bus terminal. I have no doubt that we were their first American guests. "Business" is conducted in French, welcome is warm, service is timely and efficient. There are few surprises on the menu, but everything we ordered was good: Entrees of quail confit on grilled vegetables and salad with shaved parmesan; Plates of Cod with olive semolina and Dorade with piperade; Desserts, mascarpone with raspberries; Cherry sorbet with almond tuilles. With a bottle of quite decent Morgon and coffee, the check was 83 euros. A pleasant evening.


Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

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Today's issue of the Figaroscope (weekly supplement to the Figaro including, amongst other things, most of the restaurant reviews) has a special review of l'Entredgeu (83, rue Laugier) and says it is both one of the best value restaurants in paris at this time as well as star-level quality. I have hardly ever red such a perfect review in le Figaroscope (they always dislike at least one thing)- one more reason to go and check it out pretty fast.

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Has anyone been to L'Entredgeu in Paris near Porte Champerret in the 17th? I read about it in a blog on the internet, and then saw it featured in Figaroscope. Any comments on the place would be appreciated. I will try it next month when everything opens up again.


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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Yup, I ate there shortly after he moved from Chez Michel (which I must have eaten at 10 times and always loved) and was not blown away; but I'm willing to try again and the reviews (not only Figaro's) have mostly been positive. Caution: it's hard to find as the streets are all strange there.


John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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(Please read with French accent)

Ah but Monsieur, I know Ze Paris like ze back of my hand, those leetle streets are no obstruction when you are searching for a restaurant!

Mais merci pour votre comment. :wink:


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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YEs, just went for the first time this summer. IT was superb: would highly recommend it. Very few tourists, lovely service, relatively inexpensive. Not the most exciting neighbourhood, but who cares?

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Has anyone been to L'Entredgeu in Paris near Porte Champerret in the 17th? I read about it in a blog on the internet, and then saw it featured in Figaroscope.

<shameless self promotion>

Was it this blog?

</shameless self promotion>

:laugh:


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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L'entredgeu is an excellent tiny bistrot frequented mostly by parisians. Tasty dishes and wines from small proprioters all at reasonable prices.When i asked mme ,the hostess and wife of the chef as to what will they do if they get innundiated by tourists she said "Heureusement Ils mangent avant 20h30."

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Has anyone been to L'Entredgeu in Paris near Porte Champerret in the 17th? I read about it in a blog on the internet, and then saw it featured in Figaroscope.

<shameless self promotion>

Was it this blog?

</shameless self promotion>

:laugh:

Miss Pim,

It most certainly was your blog! I should of known you were on here somewhere.

Great review! I look forward to reading them all. I have your page saved as a favorite now! When will you be in Paris again?


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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When i asked mme ,the hostess and wife of the chef as to what will they do if they get innundiated by tourists she said "Heureusement Ils mangent avant 20h30."

C'est vrai pour les touristes Americaine et d'Angleterre mais c'est pas vrai pour moi!


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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If one wants to eat with Parisians, it's best to show up after 8:30 at neighborhood restaurants and after 9:00 at the fancier ones, although I've been known to cheat by a half hour sometimes. If you find a restaurant that caters to Spanish tourists, you'll never have to worry about dining too late. :biggrin:


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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When will you be in Paris again?

in a couple of weeks, actually.


chez pim

not an arbiter of taste

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I will be there the 15th, the 21st and 27th next month. Any restos you are dying to try?


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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HELP< HELP, HELP!!!!!!!

I am trying to call entredgeu to make reservations and keep getting a message that the number is not working?!! Can anyone help me...please?


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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Where are you? Outside of France? 33.1.40.54.97.24

Inside France? 01.40.54.97.24

Is the operator telling you that the major trunk line is busy, or that your specific number is not working?


eGullet member #80.

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Margaret, thank you for your reply, it was my fault I was dialing wrong!

I did go to Entredgeu on the 18th and had a fabulous dinner! The appetizers were original as were the entres. I was trying to cut on calories so I had the cheese and my companion had the baked figs which were to die for. I am sorry for not having an eloquent description, but we were on our second bottle of wine for the evening and descriptions became hazy! :blush:

The quality of food to the price (28 euros prix fixe) was excellent. I highly recommend this place!


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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I did go to Entredgeu on the 18th and had a fabulous dinner!  I was trying to cut on calories so I had the cheese and my companion had the baked figs which were to die for.

I hope that you were able to sample enough of your companion's dessert to have made up for your caloric economy. I have a gut feeling that you really have no concerns re overeating, and that when in France you should just "have at it". I'm glad you enjoyed L'Entredgeu. :biggrin:


eGullet member #80.

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I hope that you were able to sample enough of your companion's dessert to have made up for your caloric economy.  I have a gut feeling that you really have no concerns re overeating, and that when in France you should just "have at it".  I'm glad you enjoyed L'Entredgeu.  :biggrin:

Well the truth is, I ate most of his dessert :raz: and I really think the calories in France just don't count, right?


Paris is a mood...a longing you didn't know you had, until it was answered.

-An American in Paris

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Well the truth is, I ate most of his dessert :raz: and I really think the calories in France just don't count, right?

Right. Our daughter seems to have grown up with friends whose mothers had similar theories. One believed we had a separate stomach for dessert so it didn't matter how much you ate for dinner, there was always the dessert stomach for the dessert. Another professed the belief that ice cream trickled between bits of food in your stomach and filled in the cracks. I think my daughter picked her friends much as we pick our places to visit. I'm not surprised. :biggrin:

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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We enjoyed a lunch here in early September. Took no notes

and drank lots of reasonably priced Brouilly. I found it to be

a casual, rustic style bistro. Tightly spaced tables. Front of house

appears to be young, family women. There were many daily

specials [written on a chalk baord] ..interesting sounding and

definitely meta-bistro. My app. was quail on a Moroccan scented

israeli couscous. My main was a pigeon, perfectly cooked, lightly

sauced & accompanied by very fresh, tasty veggies. I do wish

that the legs and feet weren't adorning my plate! Certain I

had dessert, just can't recall it. My husband's meal was equally

appreciated.

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John Talbott - Aug 18 2004, 06:40 AM

Yup, I ate there shortly after he moved from Chez Michel (which I must have eaten at 10 times and always loved) and was not blown away; but I'm willing to try again and the reviews (not only Figaro's) have mostly been positive. Caution: it's hard to find as the streets are all strange there.

In point of fact, Philippe Tredgeu, protege of Thierry Breton at Chez Michel, did his cooking at Chez Casimir, next door to Chez Michel. He's been chef-owner of l'Entredgeu since January last. His wife, Catherine, is in charge of the front of the house.

Excellent cuisine, pleasant service. I've eaten there half a dozen times so far and will return tonight. :wub:


Edited by Maurice (log)

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I dined yesterday at l'entredgeu with maurice and 2 other americans.

I had been there when they 1st opened and was curious to see how they have coped with success.

They have 2 sittings now and the people next to us spoke english,however french still dominated on this sat night.Service was harried but very efficient and catherine the hostess and wife of the chef amazingly still remembered me. and was as gracious as ever and indicated that they will not expand despite the success.

The food was as good as ever,we had delicious game with foie gras and wine that was decent and reasonable(a madiran for 18E).Figue tart etc.Cuisine of this quality

at around 35E is still a steal.

Prices are up by about 5%,specially if you use les supplements.Service is a bit more harried but is still very pleasant.Lingering becomes a problem

however . Overall, this is still the type of bistrot that one can find only in france.

THE SECRET IS OUT.

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