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torakris

Olive Oil Pressed with Citrus

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Shopping for olive oils today I ran across a bottle of olive oil that said it was pressed with lemons. The name was Agrumato or something like that.

Has anyone ever tried this?

what is it like?

what do you use it with?

I am tempted to buy it the next time I am there...........


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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You'd need or lot of lemons , or just very heavy ones.

Or have I just misunderstood :unsure:


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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You'd need or lot of lemons , or just very heavy ones.

Or have I just misunderstood  :unsure:

It took me about 5 minutes of reading this over to figure out what you were talking about! :blink::biggrin:

I get it, the olive oil actually being PRESSED by the lemons..............

I think they mean more of an infused type of oil,

of course I could be way off here. :blink:

I guess that is why I am asking...........

I should stay off the computer late at night I can't think coherently,

OK it is only 8:00pm but that is late for me! :shock:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Sorry, it was a bad joke!

Seriously though, I don't know how it will affect the keeping qualities of the oil - the extra virgin designation is all about the acidity of the oil, and is supposed to affect the keeping qualities - and surely lemons will up the acidity.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

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Perhaps they just use lemon peel in with the olives during the pressing?


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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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What's so special about the lemon infused oils you buy? Is this another convenience product that saves you from having to do it yourself? Or is it done better than you can do for yourself? It's always seemed so easy to do at home.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Lemon olive oil is great drizzled over grilled or sautéed fish or chicken breast. The O Olive company in California does it with Meyer lemons. I tasted it at the Fancy Food Fair - great but very expensive. I think they have a way of removing the juice as the flavor is pure Meyer lemon zest.


Ruth Friedman

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Ruth, Lemon oil is a kitchen blessing and I make it all the time. (Try it on a salad of assorted tomatoes, too.) It's so simple. Just heat up a little olive oil with some lemon peel in it. My question is whether there's something better about commercially produced lemon oil? There are so many things I can't make at home that I am loath to add yet another bottle of something to my cupboard when I can make it in small amounts as needed.

I confess that I'm a condiment addict. :unsure: There are (even without lemon oil) so many bottles and jars of condiments and spices in my cupboards and fridge that I hardly have room for food. :laugh::blink::blink: Just yesterday I bought a "backup" bottle of Banyuls vinegar as the one I'm working on is getting low. :biggrin:


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Ruth is spot on. I've got the Blood Orange version of O -- it is wonderful as a drizzle on grilled fish or chicken. I figure O is worth it the same way truffle oil is; I don't have access to the kind of oil and lemons they use (they press the oil, after all).

Remember, there's a difference between O olive oils with citrus, and pure citrus oils such as Boyajian makes. The pure oils are more for flavoring recipes where extracts won't work, while the flavored olive oil is a condiment. (Mottmott, welcome to the club; one can't have too many condiments, only too little room. :raz: )

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The Agrumato line is excellent: my favorite is the tangerine ( pressed with OO). Of course this isn't a kitchen necessity, but rather a lovely indulgence.

Drizzled over salad, these oils add another level of flavor. They ARE different from olive oils where you add some zest, or use lemon juice instead of vinegar as your acid in salads.

They don't come cheap. We sell the orange, lemon , tangerine and herb oils.

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I get it, the olive oil actually being PRESSED by the lemons..............

I think they mean more of an infused type of oil,

of course I could be way off here. :blink:

Not quite an infused oil. It's what you might call an integrated oil. The lemons are crushed together with the olives. Later, when the oil and other liquids are separated (yes, olives do contain water) you have a product that contains both lemon oil and olive oil. Fairway just came out with their own house brand (their house brand evoos are exellent) of integrated lemon/olive oil that is cheaper than the versions by O and Da Vero and, to my taste, maybe a little better,

I love integrated lemon/olive oil on seafood, poultry, salads, in mayonnaise... just about anywhere you would like a little lemon flavor.


--

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I'm suddenly thinking of Greek food...

Melitzanosalata or hummus made with that lemony olive oil would be divine!

Drizzled on a simply grilled whole fish with a little oregano.

Mashed to a paste with rosemary, garlic and oregano and rubbed on a leg of lamb to marinate prior to grilling.

Must have Greek food soon...1291.gif


Katie M. Loeb
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It's what you might call an integrated oil.

that's a really nice turn of phrase--may i borrow it to describe these delicious elixirs when i use them in class? i, too, am a big fan of the "o" brand, and especially the blood orange and meyer lemon ones. they are a bit less expensive than the agrumato.

not sure if anyone's mentioned this, but they are best used as a finishing oil, or a flavoring agent, as the delicate flavor dims when heated...so no blood orange oo saute.


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

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Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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It's what you might call an integrated oil.

that's a really nice turn of phrase--may i borrow it to describe these delicious elixirs when i use them in class? i, too, am a big fan of the "o" brand, and especially the blood orange and meyer lemon ones. they are a bit less expensive than the agrumato.

not sure if anyone's mentioned this, but they are best used as a finishing oil, or a flavoring agent, as the delicate flavor dims when heated...so no blood orange oo saute.

Well put. I've used all of the O varieties at various times on fish or chicken, in salad dressing, and even in mashed sweet potatoes. The oils aren't cheap (unless you find them at TJ Maxx :cool: ) but it doesn't take much to make an impact.


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It's what you might call an integrated oil.

that's a really nice turn of phrase--may i borrow it to describe these delicious elixirs when i use them in class?

Why not? After all, I borowed the phrase from the side of my Fairway bottle. :cool:


--

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It's what you might call an integrated oil.

that's a really nice turn of phrase--may i borrow it to describe these delicious elixirs when i use them in class? i, too, am a big fan of the "o" brand, and especially the blood orange and meyer lemon ones. they are a bit less expensive than the agrumato.

not sure if anyone's mentioned this, but they are best used as a finishing oil, or a flavoring agent, as the delicate flavor dims when heated...so no blood orange oo saute.

Well put. I've used all of the O varieties at various times on fish or chicken, in salad dressing, and even in mashed sweet potatoes. The oils aren't cheap (unless you find them at TJ Maxx :cool: ) but it doesn't take much to make an impact.

If I recall, the O brand is infused, not integrated. The biggest difference is that you have a potential for faster rancidity.

The company I USED to work for (yep, laid off on Monday) sold DaVero Meyer Lemon Oil. It was also an oil that was made of pressing the Meyer lemons with Olives. It is the oil from the skins that gets blended with the oil ~ the juices (water) from the lemons and olives are then filtered out.

It is not a cooking oil, per se, but a finishing oil. It technically cannot be called Extra Virgin and if one sees an "Extra Virgin Olive Oil" that is infused with something, it is incorrect. The IOOC is trying to stop this practice but I don't believe any of the U.S. organizations are willing to fight the battle at this time.

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There's a type of olive oil that is made by crushing fresh, tree-ripened citrus fruit together with the olives at the time of pressing. I can't recall what that type of oil is called Avagmollo? Something along that line, I believe. Any help?

scb


 ... Shel


 

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