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markf424

To grill or to griddle...

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While I've read the threads on DCS vs. Viking vs. Thermador vs. Wolf, etc., one thing I've missed is a conversation on whether to purchase the grill option or the griddle option on these ranges. Which is more useful? I understand that the grill option is probably going to require a more significant ventilation system - is it worth it? Who has the grill and who uses it? What about the griddle? Is it better to skip both of these and just add another set of burners?

Yet another question - why not cooktops with separate ovens instead of a combination piece? It seems that everyone here agrees with purchasing a full stove. Aesthetically and ergonomically, I prefer having my double oven at a higher level off to the side of my range. Any feedback there?

I'm just full of questions today.

-Mark

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I would go for extra burners. It's more flexibly, since you can always put a heavy cast iron grill/griddle over two of the burners when you need it. And it's a lot easier to clean.

As for seperates vs. a range, I went with a range and a seperate single wall oven. That way I could put a microwave above the wall oven and a warming drawer below. With a double oven the other pieces wouldn't fit. But that has more to do with the size and layout of my kitchen than with any innate preference for one approach or the other.


Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

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While I've read the threads on DCS vs. Viking vs. Thermador vs. Wolf, etc., one thing I've missed is a conversation on whether to purchase the grill option or the griddle option on these ranges.  Which is more useful?  I understand that the grill option is probably going to require a more significant ventilation system - is it worth it?  Who has the grill and who uses it?  What about the griddle?  Is it better to skip both of these and just add another set of burners?

I've got the Thermador with the grill and I use it whenever It's too cold / wet to grill outside or for a side dish or veggies that aren't worth lighting up the charcoal for.

As far as the ventilation goes, yes you do need a good extractor but I need that the way I cook anyway, or else I'm always setting off smoke alarms by de-glazing pans or searing stuff.

The extra room on the cooktop is useful in itself. More burners may be a good option but I can't say I'd use that more than the grill. I'm not a big griddle fan. I have pans for that.

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I've got a 36" wolf range with the GRILL. I don't cook very fatty food on it. Even with a serious exhaust it gets to smoky.

I use it for chicken breasts, grilled tuna, shrimp, toasting bread for bruscetta, warming torillas and other things I'm sure.

I cleans up very easily.

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My dream kitchen makeover would have a grill, not a griddle, because that's what I use more. And a continuous grid over the widely-spaced burners -- I hate having the pans bump up against each other. And yes, it would have a cooktop separate from the oven(s?), because I want gas burners but electric baking. Yeah, I know there are dual-fuel ranges, but I want them separated.

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IMHO, grilling =mess. that's why we do it outside.

in my dream kitchen, i'd love a griddle, because it can do soooo much more than pancakes (think flat top), and the metal is thick and delivers consistent heat for a very long time, but, i still think burners are the way to go. get a good two-burner-spanning griddle pan (and a grill pan, too, for those days you MUST eat grill marked food, and it's sleeting outside), and tuck them under the sink when not in use--then you've got the functionalilty of burners, burners, burners.


"Laughter is brightest where food is best."

www.chezcherie.com

Author of The I Love Trader Joe's Cookbook ,The I Love Trader Joe's Party Cookbook and The I Love Trader Joe's Around the World Cookbook

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Thanks for the replies. Pretty much as I expected. If I purchased the grill, I probably would have only used it for fish filets and grilled sandwiches or bread anyway. I have a heavy two-burner griddle already but assumed the built in griddle would cook more evenly (not that I'm having much trouble with my existing griddle).

Being that the house is going to be in Austin, Texas, and I'm planning on building an outdoor kitchen with a 48" grill, I think 4 burners and a griddle are probably the direction I'm headed. Cooktop, with separate electric ovens.

-Mark

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I have two homes; ergo, I have two cooking systems. In Manhattan, I have a junky 6 burner Viking stove with two ovens and a builtin griddle, all gas. On Cape Cod, I have a moderately priced Thermador. The stovetop is gas with a builtin convertible electric grill/griddle. I have a separate electric oven, an arrangement I prefer. It lets me store pots and pans conveniently under the stovetop and puts the oven at a comfortable height.

I use the griddles for quantity cooking: bacon, french toast, sauteed potatoes. Cleanup is pretty easy in both cases. The grill gets used for chicken, quail, fish, etc. I use it far more than the griddle in that particular arrangement..


Pat G.

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This falls under the "other high end range questions" subtitle to this thread:

Has anyone had any experience with the French top that Wolf offers? Here is a little video demo from their web page. I've seen these in use in restaurants, but never in a home kitchen. Is it practical for the home cook? How long do they take to heat up?


Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

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Is it practical for the home cook?  How long do they take to heat up?

I noticed that in the video clip. It was a little deceptive since both pots were already heated. I would have liked to have seen how long it takes to bring a pot of cold water to a boil sitting on the center "hot" ring.

Also, how does the fuel usage compare to a 4- or 5-burner stove? I imagine getting the center ring up to 750 degrees would take a lot of gas. Would this mean, thanks to a high utility bill, I couldn't afford to cook every night of the week?

I'd pass....


 

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Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

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Tim Oliver

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I used to have separate oven off to the side. The reason that I went to combo unit recently is that I wanted the oven under the hood. I guess there are other options--separate venting for the oven or long hood to cover both, but, for me, I want to be able to vent the oven with strong exhaust fan for some of the cooking that I do in the oven, or even for when I overfill the pan and am accidently baking batter on the floor of the oven (it happens).


Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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fredbram:

Excellent point and one I hadn't even considered. I once made cheesecake without the requisite pan of water underneath. Not only did it crack, it overflowed the pan and burned all over the floor of my oven. Cheesecake is delicious, but torched cheesecake juice is atrocious.

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