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Sweet Willie

Jagermeister – any fans?

44 posts in this topic

I like jagermeister just fine as a regular drink as well, rather than as an ingredient in a fratboy shotfest.

I only wish it wasn't so sweet. Every time I have it I think that.

I prefer Fernet Branca precisely because it's not too sweet -- less cough syrupy than Jaegermeister.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
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I'm not sure about the Jäger in Germany, but the stuff I've drank on my many visits to Canada (usually twice a year) is much different. It doesn't have that cough syrup consistency or thickness and it also doesn't have that heavy aftertaste. It is "dryer" and less sweet.

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I'm not sure about the Jäger in Germany, but the stuff I've drank on my many visits to Canada (usually twice a year) is much different.  It doesn't have that cough syrup consistency or thickness and it also doesn't have that heavy aftertaste.  It is "dryer" and less sweet.

Interesting. Assuming that Jägermeister is significantly less sweet in the incarnations not intended for the American market reinforces the notion that it is a herbal digestive like Fernet Branca and Underberg, and suggests that it was sweetened for American tastes and modes of consumption (most Americans don't even know what a digestive is, and bitter is not a flavor that is appreciated by many Americans). Would you say that the Canadian version is closer in style to Fernet Branca, et al?


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Back during my college days (this is going back to the late 80's) I remember one party where some guy told me that the Jager in Europe actually had some narcotic ingredient in it. I'm sure this is pure bullshit, but I've actually heard other people mention this on other occassions.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

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Back during my college days (this is going back to the late 80's) I remember one party where some guy told me that the Jager in Europe actually had some narcotic ingredient in it. I'm sure this is pure bullshit, but I've actually heard other people mention this on other occassions.

Yes, it is pure bullshit. And, IMO, this rumor is the primary reason behind the popularity of Jägermeister in America. I heard it plenty when I was in college, and knew many people who drank it exclusively for that reason (indeed, this is the stated reason the guys in Metallica got into it). While some few Americans with palates that appreciate bitter flavors may actually enjoy Jägermeister (I don't, but primarily because it is too sweet -- I wonder what I might think of the dryer version Beans tasted), I can't imagine that too many of the Americans drinking it actually enjoy the taste and would still partake of it were it not intoxicating. This ie because, despite the fact that it is very sweet it still has plenty of America's least favorite flavor: bitter. My working theory has always been that its popularity in the US owes a great deal to the "it gets you extra fucked-up" rumor. Nothing else explains why Jägermeister outsells, for example, Campari.

Here is a page on Snopes.com about the rumor that Jägermeister includes deer or elk blood as an ingredient (another persistent rumor). This passage I found especially interesting:

Jägermeister inadvertently contributes to the believability of the blood rumor by claiming to use "one or two secret spices" in its formula. This coyness is a common ploy used by products looking to build market share through fostering belief their offerings are so special their recipes must be jealously guarded lest competitors steal their thunder.

Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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I'm afraind that was all baloney. It is made with 56 herbs and spices = liquid memory loss for some. :raz:

Re: Fernet Branca

I ran over to pick up our Ohio beverage journal wherein it lists the official oHIo Wholesale Price List for the liquor available to purchase. No Fernet Branca. :angry: (Oh, it is a long list of what we don't permit for legal sale).

Next trip out of state, I will try this stuff out for comparison purposes.

Something else that is vaguely familiar to Jäger -- Seven Heads liqueur from Ireland, also in green bottle but the glass was opaque giving this very emerald colouring effect. I don't believe it is available or distilled anymore, however I did work at a bar wherein we still had three bottles of it. A tasting was in order and it was very herbal and minty.

sloppy proofing, again :rolleyes:


Edited by beans (log)

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Fernet Branca also makes a delicious mint version; "Branca Menta". I'm surprised that all of the establishments that carry regular Fernet don't carry the mint version as well; it's fabulous stuff, and I install it wherever I go. I created a recipe for a 'Whiskey Stinger' that I use it in, and it works beautifully. Tastes so much 'cleaner' than creme de menthe because it's so herbal.

Audrey

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Cool. I've got a half-full bottle of Branca Menta in my pantry right now.

You might be interested in this article on Italian amari, including Fernet Branca and Branca Menta, by our own Craig Camp (related discussion of the article may be found here.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Back during my college days (this is going back to the late 80's) I remember one party where some guy told me that the Jager in Europe actually had some narcotic ingredient in it.

The story I heard is that it contains valerian root, an herb often used as a sedative.


Born Free, Now Expensive

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Jager is about the only shot I can take anymore, but only if it's really cold. REALLY cold. It doesn't burn and the aftertaste isn't completely unbearable.

I am big fan of the Jager Bomb/Jager Blaster, tho'. I think I'd rather have it like that than straight up. I'm kind of a puss tho'. :rolleyes:

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Back during my college days (this is going back to the late 80's) I remember one party where some guy told me that the Jager in Europe actually had some narcotic ingredient in it.

The story I heard is that it contains valerian root, an herb often used as a sedative.

Since, AFAIK, the actual blend of herbs is secret... I think we have to say that the presence or absence of any herb is rumor only.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Thank you for supplying that thread, Sam. What an excellent piece!

I would love to try that juniper-based amaro that you talked about;

it's ashame they don't import it.

Audrey

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Jager was the shot of choice at my favorite horrible dive bar in New Orleans.

Maple Leaf?

Welcome to eGullet Ellen. Always pleased to see a fan of local dumps. :wink:

Snake and Jake's?

Cooter Brown's?

Chart Room?

Carrollton Station?

Nick's Big Train Bar?

Lagniappe?

Johnny White's ?

Saturn Bar?

What, pray tell, is your favorite horrible dive bar in New Orleans? There are so many fine choices.

Haven't checked this thread in a while...my favorite(s) included Maple Leaf (danced the 2step with Rockin' Doopsie one night...), Cooters (drink 'round the world anyone?) and Snake & Jake's (roommate's boyfriend tended bar -- ended WAY too many raucous nights there with the sun coming up!).

But the place for the Jaeger shots...I'll never tell :cool:


"What, after all, is more seductive than the prospect of sinning in libraries?"

Michael Dirda, An Open Book

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I've found that Jagermeister was really only tricky until I figured out what to do with it. :) Drinking it in shots tended to get old after a while, and most mixers made it too sweet. Jager & Soda was ok, but kind of boring, so I sort of gave up on it. Recently I've returned to tinkering with it and have had a bit more luck. I came up with a cocktail that's not half bad. :) I'm thinking of naming it an Andere.

Andere Cocktail

1 ounce gin (I used Beefeater)

1 ounce Jagermeister

1 ounce lemon juice

Shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a twist.

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Try an apple pie martini. Google for recipe. The best ones use Jager

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I've found that Jagermeister was really only tricky until I figured out what to do with it. :) Drinking it in shots tended to get old after a while, and most mixers made it too sweet. Jager & Soda was ok, but kind of boring, so I sort of gave up on it. Recently I've returned to tinkering with it and have had a bit more luck. I came up with a cocktail that's not half bad. :) I'm thinking of naming it an Andere.

Andere Cocktail

1 ounce gin (I used Beefeater)

1 ounce Jagermeister

1 ounce lemon juice

Shake and strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a twist.

Hmm, retested that drink tonight, and I suspect that I may have been too far along in my drink testing when I came to that recipe. The Jagermeister isn't sweet enough to support lemon juice without help.

Gin and Jager work togehter great, a lot like Brandy and Benedictine, but to turn it into a sour I'm gonna have to tinker with it some more. My next attempt will probably be 2 ounces gin, 1/2 ounce jager, 1/2 ounce simple syrup, and 1/2 ounce lemon juice.

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"We discovered this drink on the Internet, where we saw many variations on the recipe and experimented with all of them." -- Gary Regan & Mardee Haidin Regan, _New Classic Cocktails_

The Oatmeal Cookie

1 oz. Bailey's

1 oz. Jagermeister

1 oz. butterscotch schnapps

1/2 oz. cinnamon schnapps

Shake and strain into ice-filled tumbler. Garnish with skewered raisins.

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Reviving an old thread for the much neglected and maligned bitter digestif. I have always felt Jägermeister had more potential than was commonly acknowledge, at least beyond its reputations as a frat party quaffable. It is complex and herbal, if maybe a bit sweeter than my favorite Amari, but not overly so. And while I do like it on a rare occasions as a social shot, or mixed with good tonic and lime, I am always on the lookout for legitimate cocktail recipes that utilize it. Many I have tried before have been promising, but sub par. Since I recently got a bottle again, I thought I would explore some recipes I had found. This one popped out as really quite good.

John Cleese (from Todd Yard of Concoctails, part of a collection of Spamalot inspired cocktails)

1.5 Oz Cognac(Ansac VSOP)

1 Oz Dry Vermouth(Noilly Prat)

0.5 Oz Jägermeister

0.5 Oz Honey Syrup

1 rinse Laphroig

Stir with ice and strain into a cocktail glass rinsed with Laphroig.

Very nice blending of flavors, maybe a touch to sweet, I would likely reduce the honey syrup to 0.25 Oz if I made it again. It showcases the Jägermeister without letting it take over, which it has a Fernetesque tendancy to do.

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In 2012 there was a cocktail competition in the German cocktail & dreams forum which demanded Jägermeister as ingredient. The cocktailnerds there created some good recipes: http://www.cocktaildreams.de/smf/index.php?topic=8702.0.

I like the Jäger Sour and the Tasbian, which basically is a variation on the Amarosa Cocktail in Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktails.


Edited by grgraf (log)

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