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PastryLady

Your region and favorite apple

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I moved from Washington State (apple mecca) and miss all the varities that I used to get. I finally found a great apple in Michigan that I love. It is a red apple that has the texture of a granny smith, and a mixture of flavor somewhat like a Gala and golden delicious combo

Region: Midwest, Michigan

Apple: Southern Rose

My favorites used to be Jonagold, but can't find them here.

You never know what you are missing until you leave


Debra Diller

"Sweet dreams are made of this" - Eurithmics

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UK: Cox's orange pippin

So many to chose from, and thank goodness the older varieties are becoming available again. Brogdale, the national apple collection does good work, with over 2300 varieties of apple growing, and at least two trees of each variety.

In my garden the Tydeman's Early are wonderful this year, soon to be followed by Tydeman's Delicious

My favourite, though, are the fruit from the Allington Pippin trees in the old orchard, which keep and cook well, and mellow in storage to an intense fruit drop taste at Christmas.

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NY State

Macoun, a mellow macintosch apple with awesome flavor!


"Chocolate has no calories....

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Connecticut

Best Apple - Macoun, but just for eating and the season is short. They don't hold well.

Wish there were more local varieties available

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Southern/Central California - Used to love green Pippins :wub: when I was a kid. They were so tart and crisp with just a little sweetness at the end of the taste. Today you can't find them anywhere in the supermarkets. All you see nowadays are the lame tame green Granny Smiths. They aren't anywhere near as tart as the Pippins were. That really changed the sweet/tart yin-yang of my mom's apple pie. :sad:

As for red apples, I encountered one too many mealy ones as a kid to ever trust them again. That being said, two years ago I discovered organic Pink Ladies at my Farmer's Market. Crisp and sweet.

Yellow apples? [jinmyo]Gah![/jinmyo]


 

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Region: New York (downstate)

Another vote for the Macoun. I still remember my introduction - I was about 7 or 8 and my parents took me apple picking. It think it was to Masker's Orchards. We picked bushels of apples that day, but the sweet-tart flavor of the Macoun stuck with me. To this day, I get excited when I see Macouns.


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I'll also take Macoun, grown anywhere in the US Northeast from New York to Vermont. Without question the best eating apple I've enjoyed anywhere in the world.


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I really miss American apples and occasionally get granny smith cravings............

but the Japanese Fuji is a damn good apple, especially the ones that are softball sized with honey like cores.


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I don't have a favourite yet. I kinda love all of them. :raz:

The last time I used apples (last Autumn) I enjoyed and was quite pleased with the results of trying the Northern Spy variety.

Region? New York, Northern Michigan and Canada

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My preference always was and still is 'Boskoop'.

Live now in Maine, peviously Europe, can't find any Boskoop

Can anyone help me. I will drive up to 10 hours (one way) to a farm that has them. let me know, please.


Peter

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I am eating an outstanding apple variety that is new to me - "Sansa", purchased today at the Queensbury, NY Farmer's Market from Saratoga Orchards. It is sweet and sour with great crispness. The color is a mottle of red and yellow-green. This may be my new favorite eating apple.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

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- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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My preference always was and still is  'Boskoop'.

Live now in Maine, peviously Europe, can't find any Boskoop

Can anyone help me. I will drive up to 10 hours (one way) to a farm that has them. let me know, please.

Not sure where you can get the apples, but this place sells the trees:

"Belle de Boskoop -from Holland 1850. Triploid type. Large greenish-yellow fruit often blushed. Terrific lively flavour, crisp, tangy. Late harvest, mid Oct. Stores very well through the winter. Always rates highly in taste tests of uncommon apples. Zone 5."

http://www.siloamorchards.com/apple_tr.html


Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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My backyard, Chi town burb. My royal galas are incredible this year!!!!!!!!!!! It's my best crop to date in 11 years. They've never been this big, this red and perfectly textured.

I had a few set backs with branches breaking a few weeks ago. The trees are so loaded with weight they have begun to lean from the trunk. I've thinned them out twice! But they've grown so huge this year, I didn't think my trees would ever produce such large apples.

We had a mild almost cool summer this year. I predict an incredible crop this year of all varieties grown in the mid-west.

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My preference always was and still is  'Boskoop'.

Live now in Maine, peviously Europe, can't find any Boskoop

Can anyone help me. I will drive up to 10 hours (one way) to a farm that has them. let me know, please.

Try Alyson's Orchard, Walpole, NH.


-- Jeff

"I don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members." -- Groucho Marx

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Northern California - Gravenstein Apples

called gravensten here in denmark. i thought it was a danish apple.

for cooking, belle de boscoop.

for eating as is: ingrid marie. though most of what's sold as such is over-ripe, and too mealy.


christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

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Mutsu (sometimes called Crispin) – sweet & crisp, large yellow skinned

Macoun as others have mentioned

region: New England

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for cooking and baking: Rome Beauty

for eating out of hand: Gala (I like the hard crunch and sweetness of it.)

Would like to try the Northern Spy for baking pies, but have not come across it in the D.C. area where I live. Perhaps I need to drive out somewhere.


Edited by browniebaker (log)

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for cooking and baking: Rome Beauty

for eating out of hand: Gala (I like the hard crunch and sweetness of it.)

Would like to try the Northern Spry for baking pies, but have not come across it in the D.C. area where I live. Perhaps I need to drive out somewhere.

Have you checked at Eastern Market? The farmers there often have interesting varieties, and if they don't have what you want on hand, they might be able to procure it for you.

Sigh. I miss that market. Used to live 3 blocks away.


Sherri A. Jackson

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Minnesota. Haralsons for baking and eating. Chestnut crabs for eating.

I do not ever buy apples at the grocery, nor do I buy them out of season.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Philadelphia - Northern Spies when I can get them. In good years they have a wonderful perfume. They're good both for eating and baking.


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Philadelphia -- I have a new favorite: ginger gold, direct from the grower. Really sweet, with a little tart bite and incredible crispness. The shape and color of a golden delicious, maybe a little greener and a little curvier.

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