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robert brown

Madrid Restaurants: Reviews & Recommendations

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And if i compare Txistu with EL Sahillo in Vigo for me their is no colour.

Oh! I forgot to comment about this. There is no "El Sahillo" in Vigo. Would you perchance mean Casa Saillo? If so, I am dumbfounded that you would place it on a par with Madrid's top steak places - not to mention above them. You must like tender, unaged beef better than seriously aged top beef. Saillo is an OK place - no more. There is no market in Galicia for seriously aged beef - no local tradition, no local appetite for it.


Edited by vserna (log)

Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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Is there any way to have a feed on the foruns? I've tried to direct my google reader to the page, but apparently there is no feed option. It would help knowing of new posts without opening the browser all times.

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It's wonderfull for you to be a good critic on restaurant, and i think it's a very nice job. But i think butterfly has just exagerated on his comment.

I don't understand this comment. What was exaggerated? I love eating all over Spain (and miss it dearly right now that I am spending a few weeks away...). Every area has its strengths and weaknesses. I felt that vserna made apt observations regarding the particular strengths of Madrid. I'm unclear on what was exaggerated...

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I've read "I am so and so" more than I think to be healthy...

Sorry for the ruffled feathers. I am who I am, I write here under my own name - I don't hide under some soccer-inspired alias - and I include a link to our wine web site. (I could include one to El Mundo, the newspaper for which I work, but that could be construed as a bit of overkill, spam-wise.) My experience and my ideas on food and wine, for better or worse, are a matter of public record. I have nothing to hide - and I will not, of course.


Edited by vserna (log)

Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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Sorry for the ruffled feathers. I am who I am, I write here under my own name - I don't hide under some soccer-inspired alias -

Is there any problem in my ALIAS? I see that here you can't disagree and that just some opinions are the correct one's. So i will write down 1000 time:

Don't disagree with someone with more post than you and that doesn't hide under some soccer-inspired alias.

2 don't fight if one doesn't want, and i don't want. You are smarter, you know more than me and you don't hide.

Regards,

BlAuGrAnA (proud of his alias)


Edited by BlAuGrAnA (log)

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I will be in Spain for three weeks in August. The trip will begin with a few days in San Sebastián during Semana Grande, followed by a leisurely drive through Rioja and Ribera to Madrid, then almost two weeks in Madrid in high summer.

My experiences in Madrid are limited to a memorable month there in 1977. Other than an interesting trip to Botín, I only remember excellent but random tapas places around the Plaza Major.

I'm quite familiar with dining in San Sebastián and Barcelona. This is a casual trip, and I'm not looking for a steady diet of Arzak, Mugaritz, and Can Roca-style experiences, though certainly I'd like to have at least one blow out. More interesting to me are suggestions about where to go for tapas (I understand that Cava Baja is hot), and recommendations for moderate 'de producto' and traditional places.

Less well-known restaurants, perhaps similar in spirit to Hisop or Cinc Sentits, would also be of great interest.

Madrid is said to empty out in August. How pervasive are the closures, and how much will this affect my choices?

We also plan to spend a few days around Toledo, and I would be very interested to hear any recommendations about the best places for the traditional lamb and suckling pig dishes.

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I will be in Spain for three weeks in August. The trip will begin with a few days in San Sebastián during Semana Grande, followed by a leisurely drive through Rioja and Ribera to Madrid, then almost two weeks in Madrid in high summer.

My experiences in Madrid are limited to a memorable month there in 1977. Other than an interesting trip to Botín, I only remember excellent but random tapas places around the Plaza Major.

I'm quite familiar with dining in San Sebastián and Barcelona. This is a casual trip, and I'm not looking for a steady diet of Arzak, Mugaritz, and Can Roca-style experiences, though certainly I'd like to have at least one blow out. More interesting to me are suggestions about where to go for tapas (I understand that Cava Baja is hot), and recommendations for moderate 'de producto' and traditional places.

Less well-known restaurants, perhaps similar in spirit to Hisop or Cinc Sentits, would also be of great interest.

Madrid is said to empty out in August. How pervasive are the closures, and how much will this affect my choices?

We also plan to spend a few days around Toledo, and I would be very interested to hear any recommendations about the best places for the traditional lamb and suckling pig dishes.

tapas and "no nonsense" recommendations could be endless...you could get some caracoles at bar de los caracoles (calle toledo), tortilla at bar jurucha (calle ayala) or jose luis (various locations) , callos at san mames (calle bravo murillo), jamon iberico at 5jotas (various locations), puntillas at la monteria (calle lope de rueda), chipirones encebollados at la castela (calle doctor castelo), rabo de toro at taberna de pedro (avenida alberto alcocer), chorizo and alubias at casa casa portal (doctor castelo) ...just to name a very few, and all of these places will do other great tapas/dishes too.

as far as holidays, you should check individually to see if they are open when in town.

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All of the places in La Latina will be open until the end of the Verbenas de la Paloma/San Cayetano/San Lorenzo (August 15)--a series of big street parties in La Latina and Lavapies. After that, quite a few places in these neighborhoods close for two or three weeks and things get very sleepy.

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On the high end Viridiana iand Sacha are open the whole month and Arce and La Tasquita de Enfrente on the first fortnight.


Rogelio Enríquez aka "Rogelio"

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Sacha? I believe they close the restaurant the whole month of August.


PedroEspinosa (aka pedro)

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Sacha? I believe they close the restaurant the whole month of August.

You're right, Sacha closes the whole month.


Rogelio Enríquez aka "Rogelio"

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Just returned from Madrid and, not thinking, I tried making reservations for 8 different restaurants recommended by fellow foodies and all were booked for the entire week we were there.

Not sure about August but if you're heading to Madrid, be sure to reserve beforehand!

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Madrid is said to empty out in August. How pervasive are the closures, and how much will this affect my choices?

You're right -- it was a ghost town where I was living -- but that wasn't downtown.

I enjoyed this restaurant -- http://www.lagloriademontera.com/ -- love having Google Maps, since I didn't remember the name of it. I was there 3 years ago. It is just off of Gran Via, near that metro stop. I remember it being inexpensive, too (important for someone at the tail end of a grad school internship).

The web site says they are open year-round.

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Many thanks to everyone for the recommendations thus far. Pablo Carrion, I really appreciate the specific recommendations - this is exactly what I was hoping for. Thanks Rogelio, I now have a reservation at Viridiana, which is comforting.

I know that there is great food to be had any month in Madrid, but it's a big city and these recommendations do help.

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Can we come back to the good restaurant recommendations for Barcelona and Madrid?

I have one day! A 24 hour lay over in Madrid! Arrival 2pm, leaving 2pm. Where should I eat?! I don't care if it's expensive or inexpensive I am mainly hoping for an awesome dining experience.

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I will be in Madrid for the first time next week until Thanksgiving on business but should have a little time to explore this lovely old city (ie eat my way around). Anyone have any current recommendations for things I should not miss (time might be tight, so don't misses are important)?

FYI, I am staying one block from the Congreso de los Diputados and I love to walk around and eat local things (so no 3-star Michelins need apply).

Thanks in advance!

Cheers! :cool:

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I was recently in Madrid and had great meals at the following (all have quite good wine lists):

Arce - rather upscale, but informal. Everything we ate here was great. Inaki Camba's geniality is a real treat. http://www.restaurantearce.com/

Casa Julian de Tolosa - should you feel like trying the amazing beef from the Basque region go here for a chuleton. http://www.elmundo.es/metropoli/restaurant.../736_ficha.html

Asturianos - pretty basic, but very good, taverna specializing in dishes from Asturias. Also, a unique wine list in that it has some interesting french offerings. The owner is worth speaking to if you're interested in wine as he was very enthusiastic about his cellar. http://www.elmundo.es/metropoli/restaurant.../107_ficha.html

Coque - it's a Michelin *, though it's arguably underrated at that. Located about a 1/2 hour taxi ride out of the centre of Madrid, it's worth the trip if you're interested in trying what has to be the best roast suckling pig on the planet (only the most minor hyperbole here.) http://www.restaurantecoque.com/coque.htm

Astrid y Gaston - Peruvian restaurant with very high quality cevice, among other things. http://www.elmundo.es/metropoli/restaurant...2936_ficha.html

Madrid's a great city for walking around. Have fun.

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Bob mentions some of our all time favourites.

In and around the area where you're staying:

- La Ancha (behind the congress) is a family runned restaurant serving comfort food at it's best.

- Europa Decó, in the ultra modern Urban Hotel is one of the top restaurants in Madrid nowadays.

- Casi en Huertas: It's a very modern and fashion tapas bar and restaurant with a superb wine list.

- Las Bravas, la Trucha and el Abuelo in the Santa Ana square surroundings are some of the classic tapas bars that every visitor to Madrid should try.

- Casa Lucas, El Tempranillo and Orixe are three of my favourite tapas bars in the traditional (and now rediscovered) Cava baja street (Same as Julián de Tolosa)

Enjoy them


Rogelio Enríquez aka "Rogelio"

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Gracias everyone!  I will post notes when I return next week!

Try to go to Reina Sofia Museum and then head to Sergi Arola's restaurant in the new museum's wing. Great food from a great spanish chef but not that high-end as his La Broche.


Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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Gracias everyone!  I will post notes when I return next week!

Try to go to Reina Sofia Museum and then head to Sergi Arola's restaurant in the new museum's wing. Great food from a great spanish chef but not that high-end as his La Broche.

I have Saturday the 17th free so maybe I'll try to do that. Gracias!

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Try to go to Reina Sofia Museum and then head to Sergi Arola's restaurant in the new museum's wing. Great food from a great spanish chef but not that high-end as his La Broche.

Sandly this branch has closed. It was away of the dining routes and the dark setting didn't help bringing new patrons.


Edited by Rogelio (log)

Rogelio Enríquez aka "Rogelio"

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Of the old classic tapas places, those that do just a couple of things and do them very well, don't miss La Casa del Abuelo (not far from Puerta del Sol). It is an old bar (in 2006 they celebrated their 100 year anniversary), traditional, with wine stored in wooden barrels and almost no where to sit. The specialty: gambas al ajillo, shrimp cooked in a small clay dish with olive oil, garlic, and a chili. To drink: small glasses of the sweet house red wine. You dip bread in the bread into the burning oil and spear out the shrimp with tiny forks. The shells, the napkins, everything is tossed to the floor. It's hard not to gorge yourself on these… but move on! The city is full of such tapas places.

La Casa del Abuelo

C./ de la Victoria, 12

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Try to go to Reina Sofia Museum and then head to Sergi Arola's restaurant in the new museum's wing. Great food from a great spanish chef but not that high-end as his La Broche.

Sandly this branch has closed. It was away of the dining routes and the dark setting didn't help bringing new patrons.

Really?? I've been there last December and I had the feeling that such a dark setting won't last for too long, but as it was attached to Arola's work I didn't thought it would be that quick...


Filipe A S

pastry student, food lover & food blogger

there's allways room for some more weight

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Of the old classic tapas places, those that do just a couple of things and do them very well, don't miss La Casa del Abuelo (not far from Puerta del Sol). It is an old bar (in 2006 they celebrated their 100 year anniversary), traditional, with wine stored in wooden barrels and almost no where to sit. The specialty: gambas al ajillo, shrimp cooked in a small clay dish with olive oil, garlic, and a chili. To drink: small glasses of the sweet house red wine. You dip bread in the bread into the burning oil and spear out the shrimp with tiny forks. The shells, the napkins, everything is tossed to the floor. It's hard not to gorge yourself on these… but move on! The city is full of such tapas places.

La Casa del Abuelo

C./ de la Victoria, 12

Ooooh... I live for places like this! Drooooool.... :laugh:

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