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Richard Kilgore

Mandolines – which one?

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I've had an all-stainless Matfer professional model for around 8 years that I'm very happy with (I've seen "Matfer Professional" sold online made of composite fiberglass -- not the same as mine).  One advantage I think it has over the more popular Bron professional is that the blades are all completely removable.  I can, for example, easily sharpen the blade on my mandoline.

I have the same one (as best I can tell) and love it.

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I'd like to purchase my first mandoline slicer but don't know where to start. Does it need to be stainless steel?? How many blades are really necessary?? Is there one particular brand or model that stands out. Do I have have to spend over $100 to get something good?

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I've only had one so no comparison available, but I've been quite happy with my Bron. The blades are built-in and you just re-arrange or adjust them for thickness and style of cut, so it's efficient and I don't have to keep track of loose parts. I think they sell for around $125 but I can't imagine ever having to replace it, so I didn't think that was too high of price to pay for a liftetime of perfect, effortless gaufrettes, julienne and crinkle-cut vegetables.

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Bang for the buck, its gotta be a Benriner. They rock!! For commercial use, something which has a built in blade needs to be 'semi disposable,' and at about $35 a pop, you can do that with a Benriner. Also seems to hold a blade for quite some time. Never seen the point of buying an expensive one because the blades aren't near as good, and the construction not worth the extra cost. Some do have removable blades but are freaking a pain to get sharpened properly and are more thickly made and not as fine as the Benriner... Thats my 2 cents anyway...

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I'd like to purchase my first mandoline slicer but don't know where to start.  Does it need to be stainless steel??  How many blades are really necessary??  Is there one particular brand or model that stands out.  Do I have have to spend over $100 to get something good?

I have a Japanese one that cost $25. There is a new one on the market that has a ceramic blade made by Kyocera. Both of these mandoline slicers only have one type of slice but you can adjust the thickness of the slice.

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I have the OXO Good Grips as well and am very happy with it! I looked at the Bron and was drooling over it for a long time, but to be honest I was intimidated by it. Decided to get the OXO because of the great reviews, and because I've been a long-time OXO user. So far I haven't regretted it yet. The price of course is a bonus!

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I'll chime in as a happy Oxo Good Grips owner. However, I use it only occasionally, such as when making scalloped potatoes and other dishes where it's important to have uniform slices. If I do a vegetable stir-fry, it's helpful then, too, to reduce substantial volumes of vegetables to slices --sometimes really thin slices. Otherwise, I just get out a knife and work on my knife skills. :smile:

However, there are eG members who've indicated they've been happy only with the more expensive models, but these members do lots of cooking and preserving. If that's how you'll use it, you may want to consider getting the best you can find.

If you're doing "normal" volume cooking, such as for a small to medium family, I would think the Oxo would meet your needs well. It cleans up easily, and has only a couple of parts that are removed for cleaning.

I will tell you that I've spent around $100 for another other slicer, which have had multiple blades that have to be assembled into the frame for use. The blades are extremely sharp, must be handled with caution and installed carefully, and storing them is often a pain in the butt. They were all supposed to fit into a holder that came with it, but assembling the blades and the frame in the holder took more concentration than a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle, and was not nearly as enjoyable. I think I used that slicer about three times before throwing it out and getting the Oxo.

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I'll chime in as a happy Oxo Good Grips owner.  However, I use it only occasionally, such as when making scalloped potatoes and other dishes where it's important to have uniform slices.  If I do a vegetable stir-fry, it's helpful then, too, to reduce substantial volumes of vegetables to slices --sometimes really thin slices.  Otherwise, I just get out a knife and work on my knife skills.  :smile:

However, there are eG members who've indicated they've been happy only with the more expensive models, but these members do lots of cooking and preserving.  If that's how you'll use it, you may want to consider getting the best you can find.

If you're doing "normal" volume cooking, such as for a small to medium family, I would think the Oxo would meet your needs well.  It cleans up easily, and has only a couple of parts that are removed for cleaning.

I will tell you that I've spent around $100 for another other slicer, which have had multiple blades that have to be assembled into the frame for use.  The blades are extremely sharp, must be handled with caution and installed carefully, and storing them is often a pain in the butt.  They were all supposed to fit into a holder that came with it, but assembling the blades and the frame in the holder took more concentration than a 500-piece jigsaw puzzle, and was not nearly as enjoyable.  I think I used that slicer about three times before throwing it out and getting the Oxo.

Most of my cooking is "normal volume" but several times a year we feed 150-200 neighbors and that's when all of the heavy artillery comes in handy. If I'm just doing routine slicing and dicing I prefer the more zen approach of knives. But I've never managed to make gaufrettes with a knife.

And your last paragraph made me laugh out loud. That's exactly what I was thinking when I mentioned that the Bron is all self-contained. Where DO all of those things go? At our house "Slow Food" simply means that I am tearing the kitchen and pantry apart, looking for some integral part or piece. I'm glad I'm not alone. :rolleyes:

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I have the Bron and the regular Benriner. For slicing a lot of cabbage I opt for the Bron because it is wider. If you get a Benriner go for the wider one. If I had that I don't know if I would have ever needed the Bron. I also was able to pull the blade out and quickly sharpen on my EdgePro so now it works as good as when it was new. No way to sharpen the blade on a Bron.

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I like the Benriner. I have the regular size but if I had to do it over again, I would buy the wider Super Benriner. The regular one is too narrow to slice a full-sized round onion, for example. The handy Benriners are found in professional kitchens and are often preferred over the more complex European mandolines though the latter can do some things the Benriner cannot.

I've never cut myself in the kitchen but the closest I've come to doing serious damage is with a mandoline. Be careful. :wink:

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I've had a Bron for many years. I have replaced the blades about 10 years ago, but it took a long time and lots of use for them to dull. If you have to slice a tub full of potatoes, carrots, etc., make a bucket of coleslaw or want to make "waffle" potato chips or matchstick vegetables, this does the job well. Get one with the holder or guard or use a blade-proof glove.

Fantes has the Bron "Du Chef" for 99.00 and the Professional for 109.00. Best price I can find and they also carry the spare parts.

and the instructions.

I have tried just about every other type and I always go back to the Bron. I recommend the Professional.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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Okay, I think I've made my decision on a gift for a special person.

What is the best mandoline made, what is the approximate price, and who has the best price on it? I live in the US.

This is for a serious knowledgeable cook.

Please help, I do not want to purchase anything less than the best, I don't own one and know nothing about what constitutes real quality.

I'm still puttering along with my chef's knife..

Your comments are WAY more than appreciated.

Thanks :blink:

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Mine is a Bron Coucke and it is superb. They are expensive in the UK but I had a look on Froogle and the US prices seem to be a lot lower. Have a look here

http://froogle.google.com/froogle?q=mandol...=Search+Froogle

Looks nice.

I'll check out all replies.

Do some mandolines have features others don't?

Am I correct in thinking the quality of the blades is the most important feature?

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You can spend a lot of money, or not very much. I have been very pleased with my Borner brand V-Slicer. It doesn't have the infinite settings of a classic mandoline, but the V-shape of the blade works really great.

I also recommend buying one of those knife protection gloves. I like to do my slicing by hand instead of with the safety device and the knife glove keeps me from having a catastrophic accidente.

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Beriner makes a japanese style that is very efficient and has a very low cost. You can also remove the blade for sharpening which is helpful for high usage. The Bron is also very good but much more pricey. Each has its own uses. Good Luck.

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Cost isn't really important. I just want the best. This person is worth it.

And I need to know why it's the best. Features others don't have?

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I have This one plus I got all the various blades and attachements. The long pusher attachment is really handy for doing french fries and the rouet is great for spiral slicing. There's also an accessory pack which gives you even more blade options.

I've been really really pleased with this one.

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Lots of good info so far. Most appreciated !

How about changing blades,etc? I assume that's easy for all?

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What is the best mandoline made, what is the approximate price, and who has the best price on it?  I live in the US.

This is for a serious knowledgeable cook.

I've got one from William Sonoma. I wish I never got it. Doesn't cut well, the blade is chewed up from very little use and has only been used with potatos.

If this is for a serious knowledgeable cook, I'd buy a nice chef's knife rather than a mandoline.

Just my opinion.

doc

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I got a Bron mandoline on deep discount a while back and am quite happy with it. Blades (both straight and wavy) are dangerously sharp, as missing pieces of my fingernails will attest to. The adjustability is great, the construction is like a tank.

The swappable blade inserts, however, are difficult to remove once inserted... they fit snugly under the metal retaining bar, and I find I need to bust out a screwdriver or other prying device to get the bar to move out of the way when I want to remove the insert. Probably could be fixed with a little sandpaper on the blade insert's back, but I've not gotten around to doing that.

The sliding pusher thing inside the hand guard/ food holder thingy broke leaving it much less useful... the only cheap plastic involved in this device. I should get one of those knife gloves and just do away with it, rather than using the broken guard.

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I also have a Bron Coucke, I dont use it often but I do enjoy having it when the need arises ( I would describe myself as a serious cook)It was a present which I was thrilled with.

I also recommend buying one of those knife protection gloves.  I like to do my slicing by hand instead of with the safety device and the knife glove keeps me from having a catastrophic accidente.

This is a great idea I have sacrificed many a fingernail.

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