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fifi

eG Foodblog: fifi - She Who Only Cooks

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Retrospect on the pork roast. In the future I would be more aggressive in the use of the bitter orange. It was there but not strong enough to make me go WOW. What was there was enough to make me want more. The Central American seasoning was good but I think it is too subtle to come through smoking. I have used it in the oven to great effect but I think it is lost in the smoker. I am headed in the direction of a lot of orange for a pork product. Orange, pork, and smoke seem to be made for each other.

Haven't eaten anything since munching on the pork. I'll have another glass of merlot.

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fifi, the Goya bitter orange seems to be what I'm looking for. Thanks for mentioning it.

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Fifi, that sound's dynamite! Especially the pork loin. But, what's "bitter orange juice"?

It's also known as Seville Orange (click here). They sell it at the latin markets and the mainstream supermarkets all over South Florida. Cuban Pork Roast is available prepared everywhere and traditionally it's eaten on Christmas. Here's a google search that should help you with the recipe - click

Also, Pork Shoulder is always used untrimmed with the entire fat cap intact.

Good Luck.

Rich

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6:00... I made some bean salsa stuff. That way I can say that I ate something vegetable today. Also, my friends demand that I bring this stuff so I will when I bring the brisket to the party tomorrow. I have to pass along a tip. When I make the bean stuff, I use white onion. After you dice the onion, you rinse it in cold water. This removes all of the strong onion stuff that happens when you break the cell walls

Ate about 1/2 cup of the bean and veggie salsa. So far today does not look good from a nutritional standpoint. I think I will go swallow some vitamins and have a glass of merlot.

fifi

why are you adulterating your salsa

it is suposed to be a strong taste. if you don't like the taste use a sweet onion or shallot..

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Me too. Maybe one of those occasions where it's the journey, not the destination?

dave, perhaps another type of experiment of conuming vs smelling should be set up for just you

sorry.... i couldn't help it

i'll go to my corner now

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Me too. Maybe one of those occasions where it's the journey, not the destination?

dave, perhaps another type of experiment of conuming vs smelling should be set up for just you

sorry.... i couldn't help it

i'll go to my corner now

Yeah.

Um . . . just stay there, and um . . . think about what you've done.

Yeah.

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Me too. Maybe one of those occasions where it's the journey, not the destination?

dave, perhaps another type of experiment of conuming vs smelling should be set up for just you

sorry.... i couldn't help it

i'll go to my corner now

Yeah.

Um . . . just stay there, and um . . . think about what you've done.

Yeah.

can Johnnybird join me?

(i am sooooooo bad)

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Rinsed diced white onion is traditional. That is what we do. Shallots would be "feh". I am not aduterating my salsa. That is the way it is done.

I can confirm that. I just e-mailed some compadres. The cook we inherited with the house we rented in Mexico always rinsed her diced onion. And the onion was always white.

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Note that I am still THINKING about food. I haven't really eaten anything yet. I am not hungry.

This, indeed, is what I aspire to. I seems I am always hungry, and so the simply THINKING about does not suffice.

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To catch up... Last night I had a couple of slices of the brisket and some leftover green beans that I made last weekend and needed to use up. The brisket is excellent.

This morning so far... I am on my second cup of coffee. Haven't thought about eating yet. Well... That is not entirely true. I did look in the freezer and saw that I still have 2 corndogs left. :biggrin:

This is what the corndog thing is all about.

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Fifi is correct regarding rinsing the white onion, at least according to my recent Spanish teacher who is Mexican (who bought and sold antique book; not only in Spanish) and considered running a cooking course. Even white onions vary in strength -- the one I used today was much, much stronger than the others I bought at the same time.

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Lunch time!

I sliced some red onion paper thin, squeezed some lime juice on it, added salt and pepper and let it sit for a while. I love this stuff. It is a trick I learned in Mexico. And it lets me count a veggie! Some sliced up brisket, the onion and a dollop of sour cream are wrapped in a warm flour tortilla. Pretty good stuff. I wish I had an avocado. The weather is too gross to go get one.

Edit to add: I dribbled meat juice and sour cream all down my front. Oh... That is another thread. :wink:


Edited by fifi (log)

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After this weekend I am sick of messing with food. I really don't want to eat again for a while. I had some more pork roast, bean salsa and am now munching some grapes. Went to friends for a while earlier but I had eaten a second tortilla because the onion was much better after it sat a while in the fridge. It always is. So, I didn't really eat anything. I just had some cheese and crackers with my glass of wine. I am out of merlot. But I do have a glass of grape juice. I have been on a grape juice kick for a while.

Tomorrow it is back to work. I can hardly contain myself. I hope that the enthusiasm will be contagious. I will have a chance to critique my drive-thru breakfast and lunch in the company cafeteria.

Contain yourselves children. Too much excitement before bed time is not a good thing.

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Fifi is correct regarding rinsing the white onion, at least according to my recent Spanish teacher who is Mexican (who bought and sold antique book; not only in Spanish) and considered running a cooking course.  Even white onions vary in strength -- the one I used today was much, much stronger than the others I bought at the same time.

sorry, since i only spent a year in northwest tejas i guess i got the wrong idea about the salsa. i do know alll onions vary in strength guess the ones we used to make our pico di gallo were realy yellows therefore more mellow?

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Boy, can onions differ. The white one I used in the salsa was pretty aggressive. I was going to ask you guys if you could smell it through the electrons!

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Breakfast this morning...

After 2 cups of coffee, it was time to leave for the long haul to the office for a department meeting. Late, as usual, I decide to make a stop at a drive thru. The new Burger King just opened but that is unknown territory and I am not in the mood for experimentation. Go one block further to McDonalds. I order my usual... sausage and biscuit. I unwrap... Perfection! The sausage is grilled just so. The outer edges are a delectable crispy brown. As it peeks out from under the biscuit, I am tempted to just nibble my way around. However, geometry and the need to drive while I am doing this dictates that I have to munch straight through the middle. The middle is juicy and flavorful, the force of my teeth expelling just the right amount of juice into the biscuit. The sausage is truly a piece of porcine poetry. Ah... The biscuit. This biscuit is a sterling example of biscuitdom. My favorite part is the upper edge. The dough fairly crunches in the mouth, dissolving into that heaven of wheat and salt, dissipating almost instantly on the tongue. The inner portion of the biscuit is a tender wonder, cloud-like, all the more suitable for admitting the sumptuous juices from the sausage. My McDonalds makes a damn fine sausage and biscuit.

Lunch...

Cafeteria lasagna... Not horrible, not great. Small side salad. Of course, the last bite doesn't make it to my mouth. I now have three spots of tomato sauce on my white blouse. (Oh... That is another thread.)

More later. I am looking for that hash recipe that was posted not long ago.

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hmmmmmm, i wonder if just the smell triggers the brain into thinking it has been consumed?

Now that is a very interesting thought. I have talked to other "cook" friends that say that after they have cooked it they really aren't interested in eating it.

Cooking affects me the same way. Sometimes it’s downright embarrassing when I have guests. Maybe they think that if I won’t eat there must be something wrong with it. I suspect it’s a combination of all the aromas, the sights and the miniscule tastings. I’m fortunate enough to have a friend who’s a very good cook and loves to cook for me. She invites me over on the average of once a week and prepares a feast. Over the Labor Day holiday she fixed a large salmon filet in a pastry shell. The next day I turned the leftovers into salmon croquettes. They were delicious.

I usually have to quit eating well before the dinner hour, usually the day before. And she always sends me home with leftovers. My gifts to the hostess are usually stacks of storage containers. The only thing that will create an appetite in me is a couple of martini’s. They always have and I don’t know why. No other cocktail seems to have the same effect.

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Fifi, Burger King doesn't stand a chance after that piece of fine writing. You have a toke before stopping at Mickey D's? :biggrin:

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Cuban Pork Roast is available prepared everywhere and traditionally it's eaten on Christmas.  Here's a google search that should help you with the recipe  -  click

Also, Pork Shoulder is always used untrimmed with the entire fat cap intact.   

Good Luck.

Rich

Rich:

Actually, the roast pork is traditionally served on Noche Buena, or Christmas Eve, which is a much bigger family get together than Christmas day in the Latino community. The Cubano side of my family in Miami would always dig a pit in the back yard and roast up a whole pig that night. Preparations began the day before, when hundreds of little slits were cut into the skin of the pig, and small slivers of garlic were inserted all over. Then came the mojo of naranja agria, or bitter orange juice and spices. After a day of roasting slowly, the entire pig would be falling off the bones and the skin was a lovely crispy treat that bears no resemblance whatsoever to those nasty pork rinds in the snack aisle. This is Pork Skin of the Gods and the most incredible thing you've ever tasted. Of course you can also hear your arteries audibly choking off with cholesterol while you consume it, but you'll die smiling for sure :raz:

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I am feeling a little creative this evening, but not in the search engine department. I can't find that damn hash recipe. I remember that I wanted to remember it because it was useful for the meat that remained after making stock. "Hash" just gives me more hits than I want to go through so I will try from memory. I do remember something about doing the potatoes and onions in one half of the pan and the meat in the other. We will see.

From the pork roast that I did on Sunday, I diced a bit of the meat. Now what to cook it in. I don't have any lard in the fridge. AH-HA! It has that nice fat cap. I took some of that off, left in the inserted garlic slivers and the seasoning on the outside. It is in the pan doing a slow render right now. Then I diced some onion and potato (using my truly excellent knife skills learned here on eGullet). I will add a little more of the Central American seasoning and maybe a splash of the leftover bitter orange juice to deglaze the meat side and cook down to glaze the meat for mixing in with the potatoes and onion. This is under construction. I am having a bite of gouda cheese and a glass of sherry.


Edited by fifi (log)

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Fifi, Burger King doesn't stand a chance after that piece of fine writing. You have a toke before stopping at Mickey D's?  :biggrin:

My twisted mind needs no tokes. :biggrin:

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This is Pork Skin of the Gods and the most incredible thing you've ever tasted.  Of course you can also hear your arteries audibly choking off with cholesterol while you consume it, but you'll die smiling for sure :raz:

The more I learn about lard, the less I worry about this. one. Truly a lovely story.

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Up date on the hash...

Whoever thought up this "half pan" hash technique is effin' brilliant. The onions and potato are cooking off quite nicely. The meat is browning perfectly since it doesn't have steam from the onions and potatoes to deal with. (Is there an "e" in the plural of potato or am I showing my age?) It would be going a little faster but I am working on the demon electric stove and I get a little timid with the setting.

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(Is there an "e" in the plural of potato or am I showing my age?)

Dan Quayle threw a lot of us into confusion. Don't worry. It's potato and potatoes.

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