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seawakim

Where's the Deep Fried Turkey in Seattle?

15 posts in this topic

I'm looking to place an order for a deep fried turkey for Thanksgiving and was wondering if anyone knows where in Seattle one could buy one.

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks :smile:


"If we don't find anything pleasant at least we shall find something new." Voltaire

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I'm not aware of any Restaurant offering "Fried Turkey's" for sale. There was some promotion last year thru a Radio and Television station that, if i'm not mistaken some local politician was preparing, or teaching others how do prepare them safely, contributing all proceeds to charity.


I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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Isn't this something you want to eat no later than 1/2 hour after it's fried? I've never heard of anyplace actually selling them to the public. It's usually something one attempts at home.


"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

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Last year I saw a flyer for Catfish Corner in the Central District (corner of MLK and Cherry, I think) advertising deep-fried turkeys. You reserve a turkey, they deep-fry it out back behind the restaurant, and you pick it up. Not sure about MsR's timing concerns; this is certainly something you could ask them. I've eaten at the restaurant several times and always enjoyed it very much, including their fried catfish and hush puppies.


Hungry Monkey May 2009

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Isn't this something you want to eat no later than 1/2 hour after it's fried?  I've never heard of anyplace actually selling them to the public.  It's usually something one attempts at home.

Can you please elaborate on that? What happens after 1/2 hr? Does is get soggy or dry?

I have to transport it to another location.


"If we don't find anything pleasant at least we shall find something new." Voltaire

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Well, you know how most deep-fried foods need to be eaten minutes after frying? They're no good the next day, or even a couple of hours later. But I've never had deep-fried turkey, Kim, so I'm surmising. Please take my comment with a grain of salt. Maybe someone can answer the question in General Food Topics or Cooking.


"Save Donald Duck and Fuck Wolfgang Puck."

-- State Senator John Burton, joking about

how the bill to ban production of foie gras in

California was summarized for signing by

Gov. Schwarzenegger.

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I dont think the product is as time sensitive as something breaded. It will, however lose some of the magic that makes the deep fried turkey popular. BBQ is a good comparison, a brisket hot off the smoker is a completely different product than one that has cooled down.


Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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Isn't this something you want to eat no later than 1/2 hour after it's fried?  I've never heard of anyplace actually selling them to the public.  It's usually something one attempts at home.

I remember in college we would send someone out to buy 3 or 4 buckets of KFC to put in the fridge to eat cold in the morning when we were hung-over from pubbing...

I am sure next day fried turkey would be just as good (we a cold beer and an aspirin).


Chef/Owner/Teacher

Website: Chef Fowke dot com

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I'm not aware of any Restaurant offering "Fried Turkey's" for sale. There was some promotion last year thru a Radio and Television station that, if i'm not mistaken some local politician was preparing, or teaching others how do prepare them safely, contributing all proceeds to charity.

That was actually being done by my state representative, John Lovick. Mr. Lovick represents the 44th legislative district in the Bothell/Mill Creek area. Mr. Lovick periodically hosts Democratic fundraisers for which he makes southern food (he is from Mississippi originally, IIRC).

I have been to a couple events at his house, and I can attest that the deep-fried turkey is superb. It is not that hard to make if you have the right equipment. Key elements are setting up the cooker outside on a flame-proof surface, monitoring the oil temperature (most people get it too hot), and most importantly, leaving enough expansion room in the pot to allow for submergence of the turkey and bubbling of the oil. Many people fill the kettle too full, and the oil overflows right down the side of the pot onto the open flame of the burner. Very, very impressive when that happens.

I have thought about doing this, but given that I would do it maybe once or twice a year, the equipment setup would cost around $ 100-150 for something used infrequently, and more to the point, exactly what am I going to do with five gallons of hot used peanut oil? Strain and reuse it? Pour it into the sewers? I wonder what the people who do this at home do with the oil.

Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA


Regards,

Michael Lloyd

Mill Creek, Washington USA

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And I laugh again. I did a google on peanut oil... :laugh:

According to the Texas Peanut Producers Board, peanut oil may be used three or four times to fry turkeys before signs of deterioration begin. Such indications include foaming, darkening or smoking excessively, indicating the oil must be discarded. Other signs of deteriorated oil include a rancid smell :unsure: and/or failure to bubble when food is added.


Chef/Owner/Teacher

Website: Chef Fowke dot com

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I know it's past Thanksgiving, but I did run across a place that apparently takes orders for deep-fried turkey at the holidays (this year anyway). It's Willie's Taste of Soul BBQ, on Beacon Ave S, phone (206) 722-3229. Went there to give the barbecue a try a few weeks ago, and noticed the sign for deep-fried turkeys. The barbecue wasn't bad - we tried ribs and brisket. Not as good as Jones (IMO), but better than most in the Seattle area.

I was thinking of giving the deep-fried turkey a try, but have the same question about the timing. Has anyone eaten a deep fried turkey that wasn't right out of the fryer? If so, how was it?

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My sister has her own apparatus for deep frying turkeys and we're never terrible concerned about eating them as soon as they come out of the fryer. The advantage is that they cook in 45 minutes as opposed to hours and hours and hours. It is also highly entertaining to watch my brother in law impale a turkey on a hook and slowly lower it into boiling oil. The turkey doesn't get dipped in batter, so it is not like they are a whole turkey tempura that you'd want to eat as soon as possible. I think getting one "take-out" would be fine.

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