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Whatever happened to the "Librairie Gourmand"


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This great little bookstore in the 5ieme was one of a kind, and I'm wondering why it closed down a year or two ago...anyone have any inside info?

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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Their web site still appears to be active. I was hoping to go there when I'm in town next week, it would be a shame if they're out of business.

Most women don't seem to know how much flour to use so it gets so thick you have to chop it off the plate with a knife and it tastes like wallpaper paste....Just why cream sauce is bitched up so often is an all-time mytery to me, because it's so easy to make and can be used as the basis for such a variety of really delicious food.

- Victor Bergeron, Trader Vic's Book of Food & Drink, 1946

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Mais non! It is (was?) such a great resource, a compulsory stop on my visits to Paris. It appeared to be business as usual when I was last there, just a year ago. The only difference I noticed, was that an American woman seemed to be running the store...

Michael Laiskonis

Pastry Chef

New York

www.michael-laiskonis.com

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This great little bookstore in the 5ieme was one of a kind, and I'm wondering why it closed down a year or two ago...anyone have any inside info?

Unfortunately The Librairie Gourmande definitively closed one year ago.

As for the librairie des Gourmets,another good reference,and situated rue monge (just in front of my business)it also closed in May 2002.

I was very sorry.

Philippe raynaud

Les d�lices du Net

Les D�lices de Daubenton-Paris

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rue Monge and rue Daubenton... It was a nice little place, wonder why it closed? And what are the alternatives??

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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rue Monge and rue Daubenton... It was a nice little place, wonder why it closed? And what are the alternatives??

Unfortunately yes.

there's any other alternative in Paris.

As for the manager of the librairie des gourments she's now chief editor of

a french website

http://www.boulevard-des-gourmets.com

I really don't know why was that librarie closed.

Philippe raynaud

Les d�lices du Net

Les D�lices de Daubenton-Paris

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  • 2 weeks later...

We visited Librairie Gourmande week before last, 8/28/03. It is indeed open.

Librairie Gourmande

4, rue Dante

75005 Paris

Librairie Gourmande

Another good librairie gastronomie is located on the east side of either Bac or Beaune, about a block from the Seine. I forget it's name.

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)

eGullet member #80.

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This is the other Librairie Gourmande, I guess. The one I knew (near my neighborhood) was on the same street as "delights" shop, rue Censier..

Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so corrosive that out of all substances it has been chosen for washing and scouring, and a drop of water added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddles it." ALFRED JARRY

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  • 1 month later...
We visited Librairie Gourmande week before last, 8/28/03.  It is indeed open.

Librairie Gourmande

4, rue Dante

75005 Paris

I only got to go into the Librairie Gourmande for a short bit--on an errand--I would have loved to stay longer and check out the selves. The women at the counter were amazingly helpful, and rather patient with my French.

-Little Blue

Edited by John Talbott (log)

----------------------------------------------

Emily in London

http://www.august18th2007.com

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,

I got a bit puzzled by the initial email. The website and events at Librairie Gourmand are still on currently.

So, from my records, Librarie des gourmets is out (98, rue Monge), and Librairie Gourmnade still alive.

Adresses of interets for gourmet bookshops in Paris:

Librairie Gourmande, 4 rue Dante, tel +33 1 43 54 37 27, metro Maubert-Mutualite

Remi Flachard, 9 rue du Bac, tel +33 1 42 86 86 87, metro rue du Bac

Once I find the time I will verify and call ( I am French and living in London ).

regards.

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( I am French and living in London )

Well it's not the hell it used to be. :biggrin: Welcome to eGullet.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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  • 3 weeks later...

What is this thing about this great place "Librairie Gourmande" being closed?? I go there every week!! It is 4 rue Dante (Métro Maubert), and is now the only bookstore in Paris after the closing of the Librairie des Gourmets 2 years ago. In fact, Pierre Gagnaire was there signing his book 2 weeks ago, the twin brothers Pourcel from Montpellier last week, and I think Marc Veyrat will be there to launch his new book next week or the week after. Michel Roux is scheduled as well. I am puzzled by the original mail syaing it was closed. Probably a mistake. They have a new web site running: www.librairie-gourmande.fr and it is a youg and quite wonderful american lady running the show. The number is +33 (0)1 43 54 37 27. I really love the place!!

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Librairie Gourmand (4 rue Dante) is indeed open. I was there on Monday and try to visit every time I am in Paris. I wish there were more stores like it in Paris. It is right off the Blvd Saint Germain and a short walk from the boulangerie Kayser...which makes it easy to get two stops in very quickly....I'm eating financiers and a cannelle from there right now :biggrin:

I did go to the Librairie Food on rue Charlot and was very disappointed with the amount and selection of books they had on hand.

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  • 9 months later...

I'm searching for cookbooks of an historical interest; not rare, or valuable, necessarily, just books that may be out of print. Is the afformentioned "librarie gourmand" likely to carry old books. If not, is there a Strand-type (NY reference) store in Paris that could be a potential goldmine?

Edited by schaem (log)
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La Librairie des Gourmets (rue Daubenton) was indeed closed one or two years ago. The Librairie Gourmande is on rue Dante, alive and kicking. Though the Librairie des Gourmets was smaller and had less choice, I liked it much better because the owner was very nice and helpful.

The good gastronomic bookshop located on rue du Bac is the Librairie Rémi Flachard. This one specializes in antique and rare books. I find it extremely expensive, but judging by the rarity of the items, it may be fairly priced, I don't know.

Edited by Ptipois (log)
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the shop closed for the same reasons that such shops close........

but one of the women who was often working the shop can be found at Promenades Gourmands, her own website and business in which she does walking tours of paris, marketplace shopping, and cooking classes, usually all bound up together in one delicious day or one delicous experience. her name is paule caillat and i've written about her this summer in the san francisco chronicle (visit my website to read.....). paule is a great source of parisian food knowledge.......

marlena

La Librairie des Gourmets (rue Daubenton) was indeed closed one or two years ago. The Librairie Gourmande is on rue Dante, alive and kicking. Though the Librairie des Gourmets was smaller and had less choice, I liked it much better because the owner was very nice and helpful.

Marlena the spieler

www.marlenaspieler.com

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  • 2 years later...

I just received a card in the mail announcing that La Librairie Gourmande is moving as of Monday March 19 to 90 rue Montmartre, 2nd Paris, metro Sentier, Etiennne Marcel, or Grand Blvd.

www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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  • 3 weeks later...

Can confirm that Librarie Gourmande is up and running in rue Montmartre as Felice mentions. I went there this week; although the shop has less character than before (and desperately needs a coat of paint), they have more space so things are a little easier to find. Only a few books are still in their boxes awaiting unpacking.

Additionally, and very positively, the A Simon and MORA kitchen shops are just a few minutes down the road and Dehillerin is equally only 5 minutes walk, so now it’s possible to cover both kit and books in a short visit.

(edited because I forgot the 'e' at the end of Gourmande, tut, tut!!)

Edited by Baggy (log)
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