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edamame?


jsolomon
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I had my parents and a couple of their friends over for supper on tuesday before we all went to a concert. The friends are organic farmers around my hometown and they brought some fresh edamame. :blink:

But... I don't know what I should do with it. They just said, "Here, this is edamame. It's fresh, we grew it ourselves." :huh:

Help?

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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OMG! That's fabulous! I assume they're still in the pods...?

The most common method of eating fresh soybean is to blanch them.

Rinse the pods.

Fill a medium/large pot with water about half way, and bring to a boil.

Immerse fresh pods in the boiling water for 4-5 minutes. In the meantime, get a large bowl of ice and fill about half way with water.

As soon as 4-5 minutes are up, strain the pods and put them in the ice water to stop the cooking and cool them off a bit. Then immediately strain and sprinkle the pods with salt and toss.

Then take a pod and suck the beans out so you'll get a bit of the salty juice. Don't eat the pod.

These are fabulous with beer... and you can't feel any healthier when all you hear about is how good soy is for you. What could be better than the fresh soybean? They also have extremely high if not the highest amount of protein of any bean.

Enjoy!

:rolleyes:

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excellent! I even have a fridge full of beer!

FYI, yes, they are still in the pods. If I had a digicam, I would post what they look like.

EDIT: confirm pod-people beans

Edited by jsolomon (log)

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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don't forget the salt! (when boiling that is)

also, some restaurants are using soy beans as fillings for ravioli and that type of thing. just open the pods, use the beans pureed and flavored as a filling. they're pretty neutral tasting so you can flavor them with most anything. i would think fresh herbs would be great, mint and such. very fresh and light!

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Just an aside here ~ soybeans are harvested only once a year I believe and you can buy them frozen in almost any grocery store (at least in CA you can) if you don't have a friend who farms and grows them. They taste as good as fresh (or very nearly so) and cook in 5-6 min in the manner described previously. Be sure to use kosher salt on them, regular table salt isn't as good! Enjoy...they are one of my most favorite snacks! :biggrin:

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Just an aside here ~ soybeans are harvested only once a year I believe and you can buy them frozen in almost any grocery store (at least in CA you can) if you don't have a friend who farms and grows them. They taste as good as fresh (or very nearly so) and cook in 5-6 min in the manner described previously. Be sure to use kosher salt on them, regular table salt isn't as good! Enjoy...they are one of my most favorite snacks!  :biggrin:

Alas, kosher salt is all but unheard of in Nebraska. Would something like crazy salt or mixed-up salt be a good substitute?

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I just started this thread about 2 days ago :angry: about what to do with edamame

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...6715&hl=edamame

To give them sort of a Chinese twang drop a whole star anise into the boiling water.

I looked at that, but there really wasn't any information about blanch and shock and salt. It was sort of low on information for neophytes who just get it thrown in their lap.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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I just started this thread about 2 days ago :angry: about what to do with edamame

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST...6715&hl=edamame

To give them sort of a Chinese twang drop a whole star anise into the boiling water.

I looked at that, but there really wasn't any information about blanch and shock and salt. It was sort of low on information for neophytes who just get it thrown in their lap.

sorry! :angry::biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I'm so jealous. I'll be glad to take some of your extras off your hands. :laugh: Last summer I was able to get fresh edamame from the greenmarket, but I haven't seen any this year.

In addition to eating them straight from the pod, you can make a multi-bean salad. I used to make one with yellow beans, grean beans, flat beans, kidneys, chickpeas, and edamame (you get the idea) with a light vinagrette. It was yummy.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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jsolomon,

I strongly suggest you eat them as soon as possible since you are fortunate enough to have fresh ones. They are highly perishable which is why you don't see them in that form in the groceries.

As mentioned above, yes you can purchase them frozen but nothing compares to fresh soybeans in the pod.

Also, if I were blessed enough to have some fresh, I'd definitely be eating them in their most simple form which is the method I described above. Use the frozen versions to mix and puree with other foods.

Alas, kosher salt is all but unheard of in Nebraska.

Really? I have a hard time believing that. Do you have a Wal-Mart Supercenter near you? They've always had Morton's Kosher Salt in every Wal-Mart Food Center I've ever been to...

1203_Kosher_Salt.gif

Let us know what you think of them!!!

:smile:

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I have to agree that Kosher salt is not always easy to find. On my last trip to Cleveland (which is NOT a tiny city in the middle of nowhere) I had to go to 6 stores, including Wal-Mart, before I found it.

I even went to a Jewish grocery, the one right in front of the Hebrew Academy figuring they would have it :blink: , they had a buch of salt with the kosher mark on it but none of it was "kosher" salt.

I finally found it at a trendy, upscale market, ok I knew all the time that it was there because my little brother is a stocker at the store and he told me they have it, I was just looking for it cheaper............ :blink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Well, I had the edamame. It was quite good. The bud light that I drank with it wasn't quite the food and beer pairing that the world has occasionally been built on, but it did fine. The Jane's Mixed Up Salt I used on it was really very tasty.

The flavor had something that reminded of really good, fresh, 10-minute-from-the-field/garden sweet corn. Is that the proper flavor?

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Edamame is great!!!

My wife makes it all the time - kids absolutely love it. She gets frozen shelled edamame and "enhances" Campbell's chicken noodle soup with the beans, fresh carrots and broccoli. Kids dig on it and it's a nice easy healthy boost to that plain old boring chicken soup!

Edited by JohnnyBravoh (log)
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As an FYI, kosher salt got its name because of the size of the crystals. All salt is kosher, but "kosher" salt has large crystals which makes it ideal for salting process required to kosher meat.

So if you can't find kosher salt, just use a large crystalled salt such as sea.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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My wife makes it all the time - kids absolutely love it.  She gets frozen shelled edamame and "enhances" Campbell's chicken noodle soup with the beans, fresh carrots and broccoli.  Kids dig on it and it's a nice easy healthy boost to that plain old boring chicken soup!

It also nutritionally boosts that Chicken Voila stuff.

Um, so I hear.

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