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Oven mitts/gloves (merged)


mamster
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A few weeks ago when I set my kitchen on fire making fries, my loyal Kitchen Crate brand oven mitt was destroyed. Now I need some new mitts of some sort. I realize the pros use side towels, and that's a possibility, but it seems the field has grown considerably since last time I shopped for this sort of thing.

There are the square silicone grabbers and silicone mitts. Then there is the kevlar glove which looks awesome if it works. Has anyone tried it? They claim you can pick up a dime...a really HOT dime.

Is this new plastic stuff worth considering in general? I find the newish silicone spatulas indispensable, and I wish to convert my batterie de cuisine to all-silicone as soon as possible.

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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I haven't tried the Kevlar glove. But about the silicone mitts: I've reached into 350 degree oil with one. I've pulled out trays of roasting potatoes and tossed them (with the mitt) and slid them back into 450 degree ovens.

I suppose if someone shoots at my hand I'll wish I had the Kevlar. But silicone is pretty good.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I bought the Kevlar gloves for Christmas gifts last year and also one for myself. I found them a bit pricy and there was one in the box. I thought I was buying a pair. That being said, I find them useful when you need some dexterity. They aren't as spontaneously handy as a good mit since you have to put them on like a glove. For reaching into ovens I like the long gauntlet BBQ gloves that protect my forearms from the usual scorch. Silicone is my next purchase.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Ever since an unfortunate incident last year with the Super Benriner, I've been interested in Kevlar gloves for cut resistance, rather than heat resistance. It appears that they perform both functions well.

I haven't bought any gloves yet; the King Arthur glove looks interesting, but I'm checking into industrial supply sources that might possibly be less expensive. Google wasn't particularly helpful after a quick search.

But it looks like Kevlar might be a winner over silicone given their dual-use capabilities.

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I have one of the kevlar gloves and I absolutely love it! I can feel what I'm doing better than an oven mitt, support the weight better, and not get burned. They are a bit expensive, around here I've found the cheapest ones are about $14 each. I got my mother one for christmas, and she loves it too.

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I've got a pair of Nomex gloves, look pretty similar, not as convenient as a basic mitt but when you're messing about with an outdoor grill or doing something fancy with stuff in the oven then they're absolutely unbeatable.

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FYI, nomex is what many of the firefighters around wear to not catch fire. Also, the military sells them for machine gunners to wear whilst changing hot barrels on M-60's

Call me crazy, but that sounds like two pretty good testimonials to me. I think you can find nomex cheaper (but it is very chemically similar to kevlar if I remember organic chemistry correctly)

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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  • 3 weeks later...

While wearing a "heavy-duty" KitchenAid oven mitt, I burned a finger last night taking a cast-iron pan out of the oven from under the broiler.

I'm now assuming that thick cotton oven mitts might not be best. (And, no, the mitt was not wet. It was completely dry.)

What should I purchase?

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While wearing a "heavy-duty" KitchenAid oven mitt, I burned a finger last night taking a cast-iron pan out of the oven from under the broiler.

I'm now assuming that thick cotton oven mitts might not be best.  (And, no, the mitt was not wet.  It was completely dry.)

What should I purchase?

That kinda thing drives me nuts. Why make a product called an oven mitt, if it doesn't work? I say sue those f-ckers. I guess that kind of oven mitt is made for ovens that only go up to 200 degrees or so.

It would be like having seat belts made out of paper. :angry:

peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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I have abandoned mitts altogether. I think the clumsiness of gripping a hot item with a thick mitt on, combined with the perception of full safety creates more danger than the heatproofing averts. Now I just use a side towel, folded over enough times to shield me from the heat. Wrap it arounf the handle of the pan, and grip is much better than any oven mitt.

Chief Scientist / Amateur Cook

MadVal, Seattle, WA

Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code

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I have abandoned mitts altogether.  I think the clumsiness of gripping a hot item with a thick mitt on, combined with the perception of full safety creates more danger than the heatproofing averts. Now I just use a side towel, folded over enough times to shield me from the heat.  Wrap it arounf the handle of the pan, and grip is much better than any oven mitt.

I always tend to pick up a wet towel when I try this, and then end up with a steam burn :sad: .

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I do it all: mitts, folded towel, and sometimes mitt and towel when moving something particularly hot and/or heavy. Also, it's good to have mitts/potholders around when others use your kitchen.

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Silicone "orca" gloves. Definitely. I can reach into a deep-fryer wearing one.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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I continue to recommend welder's gloves as the cheap alternative (though not quite as cheap as the old wrapped towel, which I use just as often). The problem with mitts and towels is you lose the use of your fingers.

Since you can move pots and pans in and out of the oven with ease (nothing like having free use of your opposable thumb), you start to feel invincible. You are not, as I found out last night. Without thinking, I picked up the cast iron handle that is used to move the grates on my grill. It had been sitting at the edge of the coals. No problem for about 30 seconds, but then the glove got hot and did not cool off, even after I released the handle, which I couldn't do immediately, lest I drop a five-pound, 500-degree grate on my foot. I had to shake the glove off -- no burns, but it was close. It remained uncomfortably hot for two or three minutes.

The expensive alternative is insulated Kevlar, used by glass blowers, among others: click here. Thirty-eight bucks, but worth it, I think, for 2000 F protection and the use of your fingers, which, as everyone knows, is the only thing that elevates us above cats.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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The expensive alternative is insulated Kevlar, used by glass blowers

These also help if someone tries to shoot you in the hand.

:laugh:

People who have eaten my cooking have threatened this, and worse.

Edited by Dave the Cook (log)

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Silicone "orca" gloves. Definitely. I can reach into a deep-fryer wearing one.

I was wondering about these.

I figure that the pan last night must have been at 600* F or higher.

Can silicone gloves handle those temps?

I bought one of these over the weekend! They are amazing and I'm sorry I didn't buy more than one. I am definitely going out to get more and will be throwing away my "cloth" mitts as the 600-degree thing is no problem!

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Silicone "orca" gloves. Definitely. I can reach into a deep-fryer wearing one.

I was wondering about these.

I figure that the pan last night must have been at 600* F or higher.

Can silicone gloves handle those temps?

I bought one of these over the weekend! They are amazing and I'm sorry I didn't buy more than one. I am definitely going out to get more and will be throwing away my "cloth" mitts as the 600-degree thing is no problem!

Where can I get these gloves??

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Silicone "orca" gloves. Definitely. I can reach into a deep-fryer wearing one.

I was wondering about these.

I figure that the pan last night must have been at 600* F or higher.

Can silicone gloves handle those temps?

I bought one of these over the weekend! They are amazing and I'm sorry I didn't buy more than one. I am definitely going out to get more and will be throwing away my "cloth" mitts as the 600-degree thing is no problem!

Where can I get these gloves??

Verbena, I can also vouch for the Orca mitts. I have given some as presents, and the recipients also confirm their value. The website for the manufacturer is " www.isinorthamerica.com " . Good luck! :biggrin:

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I received a pair of Orka mitts as a present last week. It was great fun sticking my gloved hand into a pot of boiling water to move the pasta around. :biggrin:

But I thought the accompanying paperwork said they worked only through 500-degrees...

(My husband picked them up at the Sharper Image.)

edited to add: I just double-checked, and their limit is 500 degrees.

Edited by s'kat (log)
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