Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Terrines


MatthewB
 Share

Recommended Posts

The other important trick was passing the ground forcemeat through a "tamis" (drum sieve). This removed all traces of fiber and gristle, and resulted in a fantastically smooth terrine. We'd set the tamis over a parchment-covered sheet pan, then use a plastic scraper blade to force the meat through the screen. This is VERY time-consuming and muscle-wearying work, but if you're dedicated (or you have your own personal brigade of kitchen flunkies to do it for you), the results are worth it.

I don't have flunkies, but I do have a large French food mill with a very fine double screen which I put the forcemeat through when I want it extra smooth, rather like a mousse.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just wanted to mention that I passed on "Professional Charcuterie" and went for the Time-Life series book. After looking at it, I'll probably pick up the Jane Grigson book and "Head To Tail" looks like it may be of help, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How many people who make their own terrines actually have a meat grinder? Or is the preference for a food processor from the freezer?

Have a meat grinder for forcemeat pre-work, but it is the wrong type. According to a couple of books I have the correct type grinder has internal blabes that slice the meat just before it passes through the perforations. Mine works my more by brute force and this 'crushes' the meat and doesn't give as good a texture. Apparently.

Cooking in pastry can be a bitch, but if the pastry is 'water-proofed' (either due to the type of pastry used or from a layer of back fat) it shouldn't go soggy. A poultry liver pate cooked in a brioche shell, filled with sauternes gelly is a fine thing and well worth the effort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

Planning on trying my hand at some terrines pretty soon and I do have a question. Most recipes ask for Cognac or armagnac, can I sub a good quality Bourbon or Rum for this? all "authenticity" issues aside (and hopefully Julia is will not be looking when I do this), does the quantity of alcohol used need to be adjusted to account for the difference in taste between one liquor and another?

Thanks

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Elie - use what ever alcohol you wish, but yes, the different flavours will effect the final product (I wouldn't use Pastis like Brandy for instance). If you are unsure of the final flavour profiles use add the alcohol at the end, bit by bit. Cook some of the terrine mixture (fry or poach), to test for the correct amount of seasoning (which you should do anyway).

Best of luck.

p.s. There is an Australian chef, Greg Malouf, who does some interesting recipes based on middle eastern (especially Lebanese). One of these is a pressed terrine of chicken livers and sumac. Let me know if you are interested in this sort of thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

For my very first Terrine I tried Julia’s from Mastering the Art. It is a basic pork and veal terrine so I thought it would be perfect. It was absolutely delicious and quiet pretty to look at (once sliced :smile:). I cannot wait to try some more variations, I’m thinking duck is next. We served it with Dijon mustard, homemade onion jam and fresh baked baguettes a Lancienne. The only issue I had was with the quantity, I though my terrine pan is too small for the recipe so I decided to half everything. I was wrong and instead of three layers I ended up with two. I am very pleased with the result and now I know that 7 cups is not too much for my mold.

I was also worried about not finding good fatback and did not want to use bacon. However my local butcher, “Pete’s Fine Meats” in Houston, came through and sliced some very thin fatback for me. He also ground up the veal, pork and pork fat.

Here are some pics:

gallery_5404_94_1099890757.jpg

gallery_5404_94_1099890981.jpg

gallery_5404_94_1099891509.jpg

Elie

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...