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Japanese "spices"


torakris
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I pulled this out of the yakitori thread because it deserves its own thread! :biggrin:

QUOTE (SG- @ Aug 21 2003, 01:08 PM)

QUOTE (torakris @ Aug 20 2003, 02:37 PM)

sansho really is wonderful, isn't it? biggrin.gif

Sure is, very interesting flavour herbal yet peppery. What do you use it for? Do you have a picture of what the pepper looks like?

sanshou is really an incredible plant and the Japanese use it at every stage, the young leaves called kinome are used as garnishes and also pounded into pastes, the flowers are used as garnishes as well, the buds (pods) or sanshou no mi can be pickled (with either vinegar or salt) or turned into a tsukudani by simmering with soy sauce for about 24 hours. The dried pods are what is the mostly commonly known outside of Japan, they are most often ground into a fine powder, I buy the dried pods in a small bottle with a mill attached and grind my own as needed, I don't know if this is availlable outside of Japan.

The most common use of sanshou is on unagi (eel) and yakitori, it is also sometimes mixed with salt and used as a "dip" for deep fried foods. I also like it in stirfries, where I use it as the main seasoning.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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more on sanshou from the daily nihongo thread:

word for 7/4:

山椒

sanshou (sahn-show)

these are the pods from the prickly ash tree, often referred to as Japanese pepper even though it is not a pepper. It is more fragrant then "hot" and it helps cut the oiliness in fatty foods. It is most often seen in a powder form and it is the traditional "spice" of choice for unagi (grilled eel). It is also quite common to make a tsukudani (soy simmered condiment) from the seeds.

木の芽

kinome (key-noh-may)

these are the young leaves of the prickly ash and are a common garnish in Japanese cooking. They have been described as being fresh with just the mildest hint of mintiness. Besides being a garnish the leavesa re sometimes ground into a paste and used as a sauce flavoring.

picture of kinome:

http://www.sainet.or.jp/~jurian/news/products/sanshou.html

here are pictures of the "stages" of sanshou:

http://aoki2.si.gunma-u.ac.jp/BotanicalGar...Ls/sanshou.html

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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[snip]

sanshou is really an incredible plant and the Japanese use it at every stage, the young leaves called kinome are used as garnishes and also pounded into pastes, the flowers are used as garnishes as well, the buds (pods) or sanshou no mi can be pickled (with either vinegar or salt) or turned into a tsukudani by simmering with soy sauce for about 24 hours. The dried pods are what is the mostly commonly known outside of Japan, they are most often ground into a fine powder, I buy the dried pods in a small bottle with a mill attached and grind my own as needed, I don't know if this is availlable outside of Japan. Here is what I use:

Thank you, torakris. I really like sansho, but I had no idea it's used in these other ways as well.

A while back, I had a delicious plate of sashimi salad (halibut?) at a Japanese restaurant where there was an oil and shoyu dressing, with the pickled sansho buds scattered about. Reminded me of green peppercorns, but with an almost pine-like note as well.

Now that I'm thinking about it, it seems like it might be related to Sichuan peppercorns...does anyone know?

~Tad

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Now that I'm thinking about it, it seems like it might be related to Sichuan peppercorns...does anyone know?

~Tad

They are close cousins, sansho is much milder then the true Sichuan peppercorns, though most places will tell you they are the same. If you have ever had the two side by side you will know the difference.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Hi! Hajime mashite.

I love sansho too!

I've heard that sancho is related to oranges, but I might be wrong...

Now you guys mentioned "unajyu", I got so hungry..

I also like sansho "furikake" in which sansho is mixed with dried small fish called "chirimen-jyako". Has anybody tried that? It's kinda hard to find at a local supermarket.

I'm really interested in knowing other ways to enjoy sansho!

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I also like sansho "furikake" in which sansho is mixed with dried small fish called "chirimen-jyako".  Has anybody tried that? It's kinda hard to find at a local supermarket.

chihuahau

welcome to egullet! :biggrin:

and the Japan forum! :biggrin::biggrin:

My ex-boyfriends mother used to make this, she took the tsukudani sanshou and tossed them in a fry pan with some chirimen-jyako, I can't remember if she added anything else but it was so good either as a furikake or rolled into onigiri.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Hi torakris!

Thank you for welcoming me :)

I'm Japanese living in North America. This egullet Japan forum makes me homesick!

:biggrin::biggrin:

Now you mentioned that your ex-'s mom used to make chirimen-sansho, I did a research and found a recipe! It says you add sake, soy-sauce, and mirin in order to add the flavor.

sounds yummy, doesn't it!

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If sansho is indeed related to Sichuan peppercorn, it's probably not available in the US now. Sichuan peppercorn has been barred from importation as a possible carrier of citrus canker, and I would assume that this ban would apply to sansho, too.

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back to sanshou

more information on zathoxylum pipertum then you ever wanted! :biggrin:

http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/eng...l?Zant_pip.html

This "pepper" is used all over Asia and IS part of the citrus family (rutaceae)

really great picture of all the different varities as well

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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more information on citrus canker then you ever wanted! :biggrin:

http://doacs.state.fl.us/canker/menu1.htm

The ban might not apply to sanshou (which would probably come from Japan) if there is a problem with the szechuan pepper harvest from China, it is most likely a local infection.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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so what do you all use shichimi (nanami) or ichimi togarashi for?

my favorite use of shichimi is to sprinkle it on "Gyu-don" or "Gyusuji stew".

I also like to sprinkle shichimi or ichimi on mayo and use it as dip for "Surume-ika"(dried squid)!

It may sound yucky :wink: to those who have never tried, but it's actually really good.

Once you eat it, you can't stop :smile:

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more information on citrus canker then you ever wanted! :biggrin:

http://doacs.state.fl.us/canker/menu1.htm

The ban might not apply to sanshou (which would probably come from Japan) if there is a problem with the szechuan pepper harvest from China, it is most likely a local infection.

I believe the ban is presumptive, and applied to all regions known to have citrus canker infestations. According to a paper by University of California at Davis researchers,

"The importation of fresh fruit, peel and leaves from eastern and south-eastern Asia (including India, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Vietnam and China), the Malayan Archepelago, Philippine Islands, Oceania (except Australia and Tasmania), Japan, Taiwan, Mauritius Seychelles, Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil is banned due to the presence of citrus canker in those countries."

There is no mention of peppercorns because the paper was presented before the ban was extended to them, but I assume that it applies to the same regions.

Ex ante Economics of Exotic Disease Policy: Citrus Canker in California

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Combining ichimi togarashi and mayo as a dip for surume-ika doesn't sound so strange. The common Korean condiment for mareun ojing-eo (dried squid) is gochujang (hot pepper paste) mixed with mayo. Korean mayo is similar to QP, not western mayo.

Korean sancho (a different species within the Zanthoxylum genus) is used as the main condiment for chu-eo tang (a soup made from loach, don't know Japanese name).

In Korea, we use the seeds from shiso (called deul ggae, meaning wild sesame) quite frequently. Are these used in Japan at all? Interestingly, shiso leaves are ilbon kaetnip in Korean, meaning Japanese sesame leaf.

Please slap me if I'm getting off topic by discussing Korean use of ingredients commonly considered Japanese and discussed in this thread.

Jim

Jim Jones

London, England

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

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Combining ichimi togarashi and mayo as a dip for surume-ika doesn't sound so strange.  The common Korean condiment for mareun ojing-eo (dried squid) is gochujang (hot pepper paste) mixed with mayo.  Korean mayo is similar to QP, not western mayo.

Korean sancho (a different species within the Zanthoxylum genus) is used as the main condiment for chu-eo tang (a soup made from loach, don't know Japanese name).

In Korea, we use the seeds from shiso (called deul ggae, meaning wild sesame) quite frequently.  Are these used in Japan at all?  Interestingly, shiso leaves are ilbon kaetnip in Korean, meaning Japanese sesame leaf.

Please slap me if I'm getting off topic by discussing Korean use of ingredients commonly considered Japanese and discussed in this thread.

Jim

no slaps needed!

welcome to egullet! :biggrin:

I have never heard anything about using the seeds from the shiso plant, I will see what I can find out.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

sanshou and szechuan pepper...

Sanshou is the dried green fruits, szechuan pepper is the dried ripe red fruits...and that's the entire difference.

I used to work in a Chinese grocery, and got to know szechuan pepper there...it's great stuff, but I think that both sanshou aned szechuan pepper really need to be fresh to be enjoyable.

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  • 1 year later...

I use House brand Shichimi Togarashi on Salmon filet and many types of red meat to be grilled (it seems more complex than Ichimi, perhaps because of the sesame seed and other ingredients). It's a great substitute for black pepper. I know of several chefs who use this regularly.

Regarding Shiso, which I taste in restaurants from time to time, I can only praise to the moon the Shiso Sprout. I've only had it in a dish at Charlie Trotter's (he gets it from farmer Lee Jones in Ohio) - perhaps the finest, most memorable vegetable experience of my life.

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Regarding Shiso, which I taste in restaurants from time to time, I can only praise to the moon the Shiso Sprout. I've only had it in a dish at Charlie Trotter's (he gets it from farmer Lee Jones in Ohio) - perhaps the finest, most memorable vegetable experience of my life.

Do you mean murame (red variety) and aome (green variety)? like this?

In Japan they are mostly used for garnish with sashimi, what does Trotter do with them?

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 3 months later...

last night I made a wonderful (and very quick) stirfy of thinly sliced pork and garlic stems (ninniku no kuki), it was seasoned just with salt and sanshou

I regret now not taking a picture.... :sad:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 8 months later...

where can I buy artisnal shichimi tougarashi? I would like something that is a little better quality than the usual S&B and House shichimi. I know I saw a discussion of this somewhere, and I faintly remember seeing it in a documentary. I go through a lot of shichimi (I'm a kitsune udon fanatic). I would like to get one of those little gourds or barrels that you see it in as well. Is there a certain type of store that sells/blends it?

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where can I buy artisnal shichimi tougarashi? I would like something that is a little better quality than the usual S&B and House shichimi. I know I saw a discussion of this somewhere, and I faintly remember seeing it in a documentary. I go through a lot of shichimi (I'm a kitsune udon fanatic). I would like to get one of those little gourds or barrels that you see it in as well. Is there a certain type of store that sells/blends it?

Maybe one of the really big department store basements? I know that I have seen some place where they were scooping it out of a big barrel, I can't remember where though....

I think I also saw a store selling it like that in Asakusa but I can't remember what else they were selling.

I am not sure why I even bothered to reply to your post even though I have no answer... :wacko:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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where can I buy artisnal shichimi tougarashi? I would like something that is a little better quality than the usual S&B and House shichimi. I know I saw a discussion of this somewhere, and I faintly remember seeing it in a documentary. I go through a lot of shichimi (I'm a kitsune udon fanatic). I would like to get one of those little gourds or barrels that you see it in as well. Is there a certain type of store that sells/blends it?

John, I'll have to look on my bottle at home for the name of the place and to see if they have a phone number. In Nishiki Market, Kyoto there is a spice store that blends their own shichimi as well as other spices and yuzu kosho. I'll look tonight and try to get back to you.

However, looking at your location, you are a short train ride away! It wouldn't take much of an excuse for me to spend the day at Nishiki if I lived in Osaka!

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I think Akiko's right, Kyoto is the best place for shichimi...and therefore the depachika's which deal in regional specialties are always a good bet outside Kyoto.

English recipe for shichimi tougarashi

This is not a bad recipe. Seeds should be stirred in a pan till they pop, and chilis should be gently dry-fried. All ingredients should be reduced to a coarse "meal", though seeds may be left whole.

Tokyo-style - use more chili

Kyoto-style - use less chili, more aromatics.

The basics: dried chilis, powdered sansho (the green berries - the ripe ones are Szechuan pepper), dried mikan peel (scrape all white off before drying), black, or black and white sesame seeds, poppy seeds, and/or rape seeds, nori (laver), and other dried seaweeds - bright green or red, dried ginger.

Also popular - dried yuzu peel.

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