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Season for figs?


pattimw
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I live in Seattle (OK, not exactly in the Northeast) and my sister's first crop of figs was ripe a couple of weeks ago. That was about the same time I started seeing fresh figs in the grocery store, too. I'm sure they must be available in Boston by now.

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seeing 'em here in nyc - both green and purple.

How should one prepare the green ones? I think I know what a ripe mission fig should taste like but I'm less certain with the green.

My neighbor has a green fig tree growing over into my yard and the one I tried last year just didn't taste ripe. Is this a fruit that I should plan on poaching regardless of ripeness?

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I live in Boston and have seen calimyrna figs (yellow-green ones) in many supermarkets and at those fruit vendors by Downtown Crossing. I haven't seen the darker Mission figs, but if I had to guess who had them, I'd say Formaggio Kitchen in Cambridge.

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I live in Boston and have seen calimyrna figs (yellow-green ones) in many supermarkets and at those fruit vendors by Downtown Crossing. I haven't seen the darker Mission figs, but if I had to guess who had them, I'd say Formaggio Kitchen in Cambridge.

Thanks very much! I've been meaning to go to Formaggio for awhile, now i have even more reason.

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Pattimw, even if they don't have figs at F.K., you will be so happy you went, because the're sure to stock something you'll want. While you're in the area, visit Hi-Rise (corner of Concord and Huron) for a sandwich.

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I saw figs today at the greenmarket in Teaneck, NJ. It never occurred to me that our climate was appropriate for figs, I thought they needed something warmer.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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seeing 'em here in nyc - both green and purple.

How should one prepare the green ones? I think I know what a ripe mission fig should taste like but I'm less certain with the green.

My neighbor has a green fig tree growing over into my yard and the one I tried last year just didn't taste ripe. Is this a fruit that I should plan on poaching regardless of ripeness?

Regardless of color, a ripe fig should feel soft under light pressure and taste sweet (sweetness degrees can vary of course). Even the green ones turn slightly yellowish when ripe. No blanching is necessary, an underripe fig is just plain nasty while a nicely ripe one is heavenly.

FM

Edited by FoodMan (log)

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I just discovered that I have a small fig tree in my back yard. The first inkling I had was when my mother was visiting -- I was showing her the yard and she noticed this fig hanging from a straggly little branch back against the fence. It was, unfortunately, too late for that one, but now I have a new crop developing (very small -- maybe 8 little figlets) and have no idea what to do with them. I've had a salad with grilled figs that was really good. Any other suggestions? These are the black ones.

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I just discovered that I have a small fig tree in my back yard. The first inkling I had was when my mother was visiting -- I was showing her the yard and she noticed this fig hanging from a straggly little branch back against the fence. It was, unfortunately, too late for that one, but now I have a new crop developing (very small -- maybe 8 little figlets) and have no idea what to do with them. I've had a salad with grilled figs that was really good. Any other suggestions? These are the black ones.

The best use for your few fresh figs is to let them get nice and ripe, chill, and eat.

If you still have more:

Use in a tart. Patricia Wells has an excellent recipe.

Use them raw in a salad with fresh mozzarella, and proscuitto. Derss it with a little EVOO, S&P.

FM

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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I've been making fig paste with the crop from my tree (a 'white' variety called Italian honey fig). Cut them up and cook in a little dry marsala or just white wine with some citrus (I've used lemon, orange, or both) juice and zest. Cook down to jam-like consistency, then pour into a sheet pan lined with olive-oiled foil...you want a layer about half-inch thick...you can also mix nuts into the jam stage...I've used toasted filberts (that's we call hazelnuts out here).

I dry the paste in the sun, covered with screen to keep the bugs off, but a very low oven will also work. When the paste is firm, flip it over and dry the other side a little, then cut into smaller pieces, wrap with plastic, and store inthe reeefer. Eat with cheese.

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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Just received the September issue of Gourmet. There's a recipe in there for Fig and Goat Cheese Crostini that looks pretty good.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just wanted to say, I found figs! I think they are Black Mission. I made the Fresh Fig Tart with Lemon Mascarpone Cream and a Conrmeal Crust from the July issue of gourmet. Delicious!

bloviatrix-the fig and goat cheese crostini are next on my list!

Jim- that fig paste sounds incredible.

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Fig trees produce two crops a year-a small one in June and a bigger one in late summer. At least on my fig tree in California, the current crop of figs seem to be ripening later than usual. I'm guessing it will be another month before they are ripe.

JAZ-the Zuni Cookbook has a recipe for Braised Chicken w/ Figs that looks good. I make a pizza w/ caramelized onions, Gorgonzola and figs, or a fig crostini, or eat them w/ proscuitto in a salad, but mostly, I just like to eat them plain.

My fig tree in the hottest part of a sunny backyard in Oakland is tempermental. Sometimes the figs are great, sometimes they are inedible. I'm guessing it depends on how many hot and sunny days we had. It is such a pretty tree that I don't mind if it produces nothing edible.

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