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therdogg

chocolate-bacon cake?

9 posts in this topic

Oh, how I love bacon, and one day on a whim I decided to try some chocolate at the same time as some hot bacon off the pan and was instantly transported. So I am wondering if it would be possible to incorporate the rich bacony taste into a chocolate cake. Use bacon grease in a chocolate butter cake? Or actual bits of bacon perhaps? I'm imagining a down-home rich Southern chocolate-bacon cake with a mocha frosting. I just don't know how to pull it off. I'm (obviously) an amateur baker- my husband thinks this idea is insane......

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Going for that whole sweet/salty thing? Why not? One of my favorite cravings is a split grilled bagel with peanut butter, raspberry jam and bacon! I'd give it a try!


Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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Going for that whole sweet/salty thing? Why not?

kinda reminds me of that recipe somewhere in the eGullet threads for Velveeta Fudge ...

oddly enough, the response was rather positive ....

when I crave sweet & salty tastes together, I opt for a spinach salad with a sweetish dressing and crispy bacon pieces .... luscious!


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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If you search the web for "pork cake", you'll end up with a bunch of recipes for a spice cake made with salt pork for shortening, a real WWII artifact. You could probably modify one to add chocolate...

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The 'sweet-salty' thing can be quite pleasant - I enjoy these garlic-stuffed dates wrapped in bacon and fried with a sticky orange 'sauce'. Just delicious, and very unexpected :wink:

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Oh, and let us know how it turns out!

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Dude, you have to do this.


Noise is music. All else is food.

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As a girl that happily dumps a bag of M&Ms into her buttered movie popcorn, I say you must try this! A feat for salty-sweet lovers everywhere.

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I've done this with muffins before and it turned out wonderful. I'm having a hard time imagining it in a cake though.

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