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therdogg

chocolate-bacon cake?

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Oh, how I love bacon, and one day on a whim I decided to try some chocolate at the same time as some hot bacon off the pan and was instantly transported. So I am wondering if it would be possible to incorporate the rich bacony taste into a chocolate cake. Use bacon grease in a chocolate butter cake? Or actual bits of bacon perhaps? I'm imagining a down-home rich Southern chocolate-bacon cake with a mocha frosting. I just don't know how to pull it off. I'm (obviously) an amateur baker- my husband thinks this idea is insane......

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Going for that whole sweet/salty thing? Why not? One of my favorite cravings is a split grilled bagel with peanut butter, raspberry jam and bacon! I'd give it a try!

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Going for that whole sweet/salty thing? Why not?

kinda reminds me of that recipe somewhere in the eGullet threads for Velveeta Fudge ...

oddly enough, the response was rather positive ....

when I crave sweet & salty tastes together, I opt for a spinach salad with a sweetish dressing and crispy bacon pieces .... luscious!

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If you search the web for "pork cake", you'll end up with a bunch of recipes for a spice cake made with salt pork for shortening, a real WWII artifact. You could probably modify one to add chocolate...

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The 'sweet-salty' thing can be quite pleasant - I enjoy these garlic-stuffed dates wrapped in bacon and fried with a sticky orange 'sauce'. Just delicious, and very unexpected :wink:

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Dude, you have to do this.

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As a girl that happily dumps a bag of M&Ms into her buttered movie popcorn, I say you must try this! A feat for salty-sweet lovers everywhere.

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I've done this with muffins before and it turned out wonderful. I'm having a hard time imagining it in a cake though.

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