Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Wendy DeBord

Yellow and white cakes

Recommended Posts

mkfradin   

I'm barely a professional and have not worked in France, but it's my understanding that this type of cake--a butter cake as opposed to a foam or sponge cake (like a genoise)--is unique to America. I think most Europeans find our yellow cakes and pound cakes and chocolate layer cakes too sweet, dense and dry. They are used to genoise and sponges that are soaked in liqueurs and syrups and filled with (relatively) thick layers of filling. Admittedly, I haven't taken that many classes, but none of my European instructors ever had any comments to make on the standard American butter cake. I think they consider it an ugly stepsister!

That being said, I think Rose Beranbaum has a white genoise in her Cake Bible, which I've never made, but which might give you some guidance as to a Europeanized version of the white cake.

Marjorie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What a revelation. It's true, no where do we find really good nice tasting, white cake with heft and crumb, and beauty, which is not just a sponge to sop up liquers or a brick to support a filling, but a real honest to goodness cake. I am going to take this for the opportunity that it is. I am going to introduce the white cake to FRANCE! :laugh::laugh::laugh:

My kitchen will be the recipe test lab. :biggrin:

I don't remember where I read it, I think in Julia Child's MA where she recounts that for a certain cake containing fruit, it was necessary to advise the reader NOT to use cake flour because if you do, everything will sink to the bottom, due to the batter not being able to hold it. I am considering that as part of the reason why my tests did not turn out so well, considering the properties of the local flour here, and also doing some research. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mkfradin -- what's the difference in your white cake recipe that results from the change in technique? I ask because I'm a fan of Dede Wilson and I actually made her white cake last night as a test run for a wedding cake I'm baking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Samaki   

OK, I finally managed to do some white cake testing. I made mkfradin's, as so many others seemed to find it superior, and the recipe I posted. there is no contest. mkfradin's cake is most definitely the best. I give it a 4.5 - great texture, great flavor. It was too sweet for me, but pretty much all cakes are too sweet for me without drastic sugar reduction, and I wanted to do the recipe as written.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mkfradin   
mkfradin -- what's the difference in your white cake recipe that results from the change in technique?  I ask because I'm a fan of Dede Wilson and I actually made her white cake last night as a test run for a wedding cake I'm baking.

Since I've never made Dede Wilson's white cake according to her recipe, I don't know what the difference is! Initially, I used RLB's high ratio mixing method, since it is easier than the creaming method (fewer dirty bowls), and now I've moved on to the method in my recipe, since it eliminates a further step by mixing all the wet ingredients together instead of mixing 1/4 of the liquid into the eggs and vanilla. I've always been so pleased with the results that there didn't seem to be a reason to try Wilson's recipe as it was written.

I am also a big fan of hers--her flavors and textures are great, and she's not afraid to depart from convention if it creates a superior product.

Marjorie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   

Hi all, I've been knee deep in banana cakes and now I'm trying to catch up with white cake testing developments.

What I've gleaned from re-reading this thread:

Samaki and KThull both like the mkFradin's version of Dede Wilson's cake better than their recipes. Is this correct?

What about TrishCT's cake? Has anyone tested it against the mkFradin cake?

Right now I am planning on making the mkFradin cake, TrishCT's cake and my own recipe. Are there any others in the running?

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tepee   
Hi all, I've been knee deep in banana cakes and now I'm trying to catch up with white cake testing developments.

Saw your banana cake review...it's fantastic! I'm looking forward to your white cake review.

I can just imagine how full your freezer will be at the end of all these testings! Would like to know how long well-wrapped cakes can last in the freezer? I've only kept them for 3 weeks max before finding an occasion to use them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TrishCT   

After all the testing I've done on the banana cakes, I'm wondering if the recipe I submitted for Snow White Cake would be better with cake flour substituted for AP.... I haven't gotten to testing the white cakes myself, still working on banana... Just some food for thought. :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bkinsey   

:angry: I used to love the recipes in the Houston Chronicle food section. Not too long ago the food editor, Anne Criswell, retired and the food section has really gone downhill. I tried a recipe using a white cake mix (brand unspecified) with the addition of boysenberry yoghurt (fruit on the bottom recommended) to make cupcakes. The result was so awful that I threw the whole lot in the trash, an action which those of you who know me will recognize as very uncharacteristic.

What a waste of 3 perfectly good egg whites, not to mention the carton of yoghurt!!

The recipes here look wonderful, thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lorea   

I made the mkfradin white cake and it was really really good - I think it had a very similar texture to the recipe in the Best Recipe that I mentioned earlier on this thread, but slightly oily tasting and oily feeling compared to it, but also slightly more tender. It was milkier tasting though, which I did like. A friend of mine said it "tasted like condensed milk, but in cake form."

There was something missing though - I think it needs a touch of almond extract for the classic white cake flavor. I would give it a 4 - I still think the one in the Best Recipe is better in texture. However, now I think the Best Recipe one needs to change a little, to add a little more of that milky flavor that I really liked. I think I'm going to experiment more with the Best Recipe recipe and see if I can make it with the best of both worlds before I post my version. (unless somebody wants it as it is now)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've incorporated MKFradin's recipe in my list of favs. I'm doing it again today, with a mixture of type 55 and type 45 to see if I can improve the stability.

:biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   
There was something missing though -

I made the mkFradin cake and agree with lorea's comments. It tasted very nice, but a bit flat to me. Possibly the lack of salt? I almost threw in a 1/2 teaspoon, but decided to make the recipe first as written.

Also, the cake came out a littler more dense than I expected. Very fine crumb and tender, but not as light as most of the banana cake recipes (for comparison) from the other thread. Hmm, maybe my baking powder is kaput. :hmmm:


Edited by mktye (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   

Tortured my family and friends with white cakes this weekend. Now they are sorry they complained about the banana cakes! Detecting the differences between the white cakes was much more difficult (and tedious).

Cakes tasted:

1. mkFradin’s cake from Dede Wilson’s “Wedding Cake” (as written)

2. mkFradin’s cake from Dede Wilson’s “Wedding Cake” (with addition of ½ tsp. salt)

3. Delicious White Cake from “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book”, First Edition, Fifth Printing, 1950 (recipe uses whipped egg whites)

4. TrishCT’s Snow White Cake (substituted 1 cup and 2 Tbsp cake flour for each cup of AP flour, omitted the almond extract and used an equal amount of additional vanilla)

5. Rich White Cake adapted from recipe in “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book”, First Edition, Fifth Printing, 1950 (recipe at end of post)

Tasting Notes:

Blind tasting.

Five tasters.

All the cakes were unfrosted.

Did not include almond extract in any of the recipes because, IMO, it seemed like comparing apples and oranges.

Points based on :

1st place vote = 5 points

2nd place vote = 4 points

3rd place vote = 3 points

4th place vote = 2 points

5th place vote = 1 point

i7310.jpg

(The differences in cake heights are due to different pan sizes)

Results:

1. mkFradin’s cake (as written, without salt)

i7305.jpg

6 Points – One 4th place vote and four 5th place votes. While definitely a good cake, tasters felt it tasted a little flat and one even said that it was not sweet enough(!).

2. mkFradin’s cake (with addition of ½ tsp. salt)

i7306.jpg

(This picture is of a slice taken from the layer that was a bit underdone – note the dark streak near the top. However, the fully cooked layer was the one tasted.)

15 Points -- Two 2nd place votes, one 3rd place vote and two 4th place votes. This recipe was liked much better with the addition of salt. However, both of the cakes using this recipe (with and without salt) came out a bit more dense than I expected and closer in texture to pound cake. Some tasters really liked the texture, while others did not.

3. Delicious White Cake from “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book"

i7307.jpg

16 Points – One 2nd place vote, and four 3rd place votes. This cake was very similar in both taste and texture to TrishCT’s cake and most of the tasters had a difficult time telling the difference between them. This makes sense since the recipes are almost identical (except this recipe called for less butter).

4. TrishCT’s Snow White Cake (made with cake flour and no almond ext.)

i7308.jpg

14 Points -- One 1st place vote, one 2nd place vote, two 4th place votes and one 5th place vote. Also a good cake. Like the above cake, it came down more to if the tasters liked a lighter cake or a more dense cake.

5. Rich White Cake adapted from a recipe in “Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book”

i7309.jpg

24 Points – Four 1st place votes and one 2nd place vote. This cake had a texture somewhat between the whipped egg white cakes and mkFradin’s cake. What really set it apart was its flavor. Not quite sure why it tasted better… the biggest difference is that this recipe uses ½ milk and ½ water for the liquid. It also has the most salt (1 tsp.) of any of the recipes.

As the person making the cakes, I liked the ease of the cakes that do not require whipping the egg whites. Less bowls to wash.

Overall, all of the cakes were excellent. Fine crumb, moist and tender without rubberiness. My initial impression on tasting the cakes was that they were all surprisingly similar. With the addition of frosting and/or filling, I’m not sure one could easily tell them apart. I also prefer a touch of almond flavor in my cakes, but I feel that preference is quite subjective (in fact, my one taster hates the flavor of almonds).

There are two more recipes for white cake in my old Betty Crocker cookbook that I have yet to try out, but I’ve been threatened with dire consequences :shock: if I make another cake for at least a month!

Rich White Cake Recipe:

250 g (2½ cups) sifted cake flour

(340 g) 1½ cups sugar

¾ tsp. salt

3½ tsp. baking powder

175 g (¾ cup) unsalted butter

130 g (½ cup, 4 fl. oz.) milk

115 g (½ cup, 4 fl. oz.) water

1½ tsp. vanilla

128 g (½ cup or 4 large) egg whites

Mix together flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Mix in butter. Pour in water, milk and vanilla and beat for 2 minutes. Add the egg whites and beat for 2 minutes. Pour into two 8” round pans or one 9” square pan. Bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes or until done. ( If anyone is interested, I also have the amounts for two 9” rounds, but only the volume measurements.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tepee   

mktye! You are thorough! Thank you!

Methinks you may have to reach outside your family for further cake tastings. Please convey our gratitude to the willing/unwilling guinea pigs. :wub: BTW, I would love to have the recipe for 2 9"rounds, please. TIA!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   
You are thorough!

Just a frustrated chemist. :smile:

I would love to have the recipe for 2 9"rounds, please. TIA!

3-1/3 cups sifted cake flour

2 cups sugar

1 tsp. salt

5 tsp. baking powder

1 cup butter

1-1/3 cups water+milk (50/50 ratio)

2 tsp. vanilla

6 egg whites (3/4 cup), unbeaten

Mix together the flour, sugar, salt and baking powder. Mix in butter. Pour in water, milk and vanilla and beat for 2 minutes. Add the egg whites and beat for 2 minutes. Pour into two 8” round pans or one 9” square pan. Bake at 350 for 30-35 minutes or until done.

My husband managed to survive the cake tasting ordeal, but he wants to know when we're going to start testing pies and/or puddings! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WOW! I have a huge smile on my face....another wonderful, highly detailed review from mktye. Thank-you sooooo MUCH!!

Ha, good ole Betty Crocker strikes again. You can never judge where a good recipe might come from. They are everywhere, needles in a hay stack for us to find.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tortured my family and friends with white cakes this weekend.

Thanks so much for doing that!

And the recipe with weights.

:biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   
Ha, good ole Betty Crocker strikes again. 

Personal opinion here -- I feel that for basic dessert building blocks, some of the really old cookbooks are the best. IMO, it is because a lot of people baked and ate homemade desserts with regularity back then (without fear of eggs, butter and sugar) and good taste/texture was more important than quick, easy or healthy.

My old Betty Crocker was my grandmother's (it includes her notes in the margins so it is extra special) and contains 30 pages (!) of just the american-style cakes (i.e. not sponge). I don't think I've ever used this cookbook for anything other than sweets & breads, but the other sections are quite amusing to read. For example: "The clever wife has a simple appetizing cocktail (cold in summer, hot in winter) ready for her weary husband when he comes home at night." :laugh:

You can never judge where a good recipe might come from.  They are everywhere, needles in a hay stack for us to find.

And that is the fun part!

Once again, thank you Sinclair for starting these threads. And also to everyone else -- I usually am all alone in my kitchen when I get into a find-the-best-recipe frenzy and it is great to be part of a group effort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't agree with you more Mktye...I have quite a collection of older baking books many of them from Pillsbury and other "homemaker' type baking books. I find alot of jems in these books. Also on ocasion I believe I see where a current author/chef has originally gotten their ideas from these older books. I see that lot in Gale Gands work, she definately looks and studies older books too.

I will bake you best white asap then compare it to my best white.....see if I can beat it. Others should do the same......if you can beat this recipe-thats the goal...find the best of the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   

Has anyone tried the Elegant White Cake recipe from "King Aurthur Flour Baker's Companion"? It looks like it could be a contender.

Unfortunately, due to the current husband-imposed, house-wide, cake baking ban and an upcoming trip to California, I won't be able make it until sometime after mid-June.

Sinclair -- would it be okay to post the recipe here even though the ingredients would be verbatim (but I'd write the method part out in my own words)? If not, I can PM/email the recipe to those interested.

Of course, Baker's Companion is a great book if you just want to buy it. I've not made many items from it yet (probably only a half dozen), but everything I have made has been quite good and no problems with the recipes. It also just won James Beard's Cookbook of the Year. Here is an eG link to it on Amazon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes you can post the recipe ingredient list as published because you can't copyright that part of a recipe, the ingredients or the amounts. But you have to put the methods of how you make the recipe in your own words, because copying those words exactly will infringe on copyright.

We always like to give credit to the authors too. You can also post a link to the recipe if it's posted some place legitimate......but not from a site where someone just took the info. and pasted it with-out regard to following proper respect to copyright. Steve or Neil can elaborate more on this if anyone needs it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mktye   

Thanks for the clarification Sinclair!

KA Flour's Elegant White Cake

8 tablespoons (1 stick, 4 oz.) butter, softened

1/2 cup (3-1/4 oz.) vegetable shortening

1 tablespoons (1/2 oz.) baking powder

1-3/4 cups (12-1/4 ounces) superfine or granulated sugar

3/4 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 teaspoon almond extract

-- Cream together until light. 5 min. or more.

5 large egg whites (6 to 7 oz.)

-- Add egg whites one at a time and beat well after each addition.

2-3/4 cups (11 oz.) cake flour

1 cup (8 oz.) milk

-- Stir in flour and milk, alternating between the two, starting and ending with the flour. (i.e. 1/3 flour, 1/2 milk, 1/3 flour, 1/2 milk, 1/3 flour)

-- Pour into pans (2 9-in. round or one 9x13-in) and bake at 350. 25-35 minutes or until done.

Recipe from "The King Arthur Flour Baker's Companion"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TrishCT   
Just checking, do we still have people interested and working on this topic (besides me)?

I just made MK's Rich White Cake this weekend (as the base for a Boston Cream Pie) and will post (with pics) in a day or so. I thought I might try the King Arthur one this week for a contrast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the Rich White Cake recipe about two weeks ago as well, and remember that mostly the texture was indescribably good, but the flavor was not that great. Maybe my cake flour was bad. I used Softasilk, with a little bit of White Lily because I ran out - what does everyone else use? Can I use all White Lily?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TrishCT   

I made MK's Rich White Cake and King Arthur's Elegant White Cake.

First up was Rich White Cake.

i8168.jpg

I made it in a 10 inch springform pan which could be why it cracked. But that didn't matter because....

It became the base for Boston Cream Pie

i8169.jpg

Next I made the King Arthur Elegant White Cake

i8170.jpg

in 2 9-inch round pans

Here is a slice of Elegant White Cake. The picture doesn't do justice to the soft, fluffy texture.

i8171.jpg

Both cakes are very good, but there was a definite preference by my family and friends for the King Arthur Elegant White Cake. Comments about the King Arthur included -- "Soft as velvet," "If a marshmallow was a cake this would be it," "Delicious flavor, yum."

Rich White Cake had a nice texture, but was a little dryer than KA's, it scored slightly lower on taste as well. Both cakes are relatively easy to make, the KA requires more mixing time and a stand mixer makes a simple task of it.

Rich White Cake- 4.0

King Arthur Elegant Cake - 5.0


Edited by TrishCT (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      Plum tart with almonds
       
      Starting from the first half of August, in the shops and on stands appear the first domestic plums. In September there are so many of them that I have a problem deciding which kind I should choose. Small and big, round and more ovate, violet, red and yellow. You can eat them fresh or make a lot of preserves (jams, plum stew, stewed fruits, pickles, liqueurs, plum brandy). Our favorite are big and round greengage plums, or slightly firm violet plums.
       
      Plums have a lot of valuable attributes. They regulate digestion and protect us from free radicals. Dried plums are more valuable regarding vitamin and fiber content, but they have five times more calories than fresh fruits.
       
      Plums have quite a lot B vitamins, so for a long time they have been well regarded for having a soothing effect on the nervous system and improving our frame of mind. That's why you simply have to make a plum cake. Either now or when the dreary autumn days arrive. Their benign impact on the nerves could be a good excuse for putting another piece of cake on your plate.
       
      I don't like complicated cookery. In this recipe you will find a lot of ingredients, but even so, preparing this delicious cake is very simple.
       
      Ingredients:
      Dough:
      250g of flour
      half a teaspoon of baking powder
      8g of vanilla sugar
      3 tablespoons of sugar
      150ml of 18% cream
      150g of butter
      Filling:
      600g of plums
      1 egg white
      3 tablespoons of minced almonds
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      200g of plum stew
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      Crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      3-4 tablespoons of flour
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      8g of vanilla sugar
      1 egg yolk
      Mix together the dry ingredients for the dough: flour, baking powder, sugar and vanilla sugar. Add cream. Mince the butter and add it to the dry ingredients. Quickly knead into smooth dough. Cover with plastic wrap and leave in the fridge for half an hour.
       
      Heat the oven up to 200C. Cover a baking pan (e.g. for a tart) with the dough, leaving the edges slightly raised around the sides. Whisk the egg white and cover the dough with it. Sprinkle with the almonds and brown sugar. Bake for 14 minutes. Take it out of the oven. Don't turn off the oven.
       
      Make the crumble topping when the dough is in the oven. Melt the butter, cool it a bit then add the flour, sugar, vanilla sugar and egg yolk. Mix it with a fork until you have lumps.
       
      Clean the plums, cut them into halves and remove the stones. Cover the baked base with plum stew, add the plums and sprinkle with cinnamon and the crumble topping. Bake for 20 minutes.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Pineapple and coconut – the ideal couple
       
      Today, inspired by the recipes from the book "Zielone koktajle. 365 przepisów" ("Green cocktails. 365 recipes") I prepared a light coconut-pineapple dessert. You may make it without sugar if you have enough sweet fruit. If your pineapple isn't very ripe, add a bit of honey to your dessert.

      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      fruit mousse
      1 pineapple
      300ml of coconut milk
      1 banana
      150ml of orange juice
      2 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      decoration
      50g of butter
      1 tablespoon of caster sugar
      4 tablespoons of desiccated coconut
      4 slices of orange
      fruit

      Blend all the ingredients of the fruit mousse. Put it into some glasses and leave in the fridge. Put the desiccated coconut, sugar and butter into a pan. Fry constantly, stirring on a low heat until the butter is melted. Leave to cool down a bit. Put 2-3 tablespoons of it on top of the desserts. Decorate with a slice of orange, fruit and some peppermint leaves before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Smile of the summer – apricot-peach shortcake
       
      Fortunately, the summer is not only about the weather. There is also fresh, sweet-smelling fruit. Today I would like to share with you the recipe for an easy to make weekend cake. It is excellent for afternoon tea or coffee. A little work and a little baking and after that you may serve and eat, and serve and eat again and again ... I remind you that it should be a weekend cake, so if you eat everything at once, you will need to bake another one 

      Ingredients:
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      75g of sugar
      1 egg
      1 egg yolk
      1 teaspoon of baking powder

      fruit:
      1kg of apricot
      4 peaches
      2 packets of powdered vanilla blancmange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the flour, sugar, baking powder and butter onto a baking board. Chop it all up with a knife. When you have the consistency of crumble topping, add the egg and egg yolk and then knead the dough quickly. Divide the dough into two parts – 2/3 and 1/3. Cover the pieces of dough with plastic wrap and put them into the freezer.
      Wash the apricots, remove the stones and cube them. Put them into a saucepan, add a bit of water and boil until they are soft. Stir the blancmange powder in 150ml of cold water and add it to the apricots. Boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly. Turn off the heat. Wash the peaches, remove the stones and cube them. Add them to the apricots and mix them in.
      Heat the oven up to 180C.
      Smooth a 23-cm cake tin with some butter and sprinkle with breadcrumbs. Grate the bigger part of the dough onto the cake tin, even it out and bake for 15-17 minutes. Take out the cake, but don't turn off the oven. Put the fruit mixture onto it and grate the rest of the dough onto the top. Bake for 50 minutes. Sprinkle with caster sugar before serving.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

    • By pastrygirl
      I'm watching The Sweet Makers on BBC - four British pastry chefs & confectioners recreate Tudor, Georgian, and Victorian sweets with petiod ingredients and equipment. A little British Baking Show, a little Downtown Abbey. 
       
      Check it it out for a slice of pastry history. 
       
      BBC viewer only available to the U.K., but on this side of the pond where there's a will, there's a way. 
    • By Kasia
      White chocolate whip with aquafaba with crumble topping and fruit.
       
      Today I would like to share with you a dessert fit for a king. It needs a bit of work, but it is easy, and so tasty that you won't regret the time you spent on it. I have already made chocolate whip with aquafaba. Today I added a bit of whisked sweet cream, due to which it is more creamy but it isn't suitable for vegetarians.

      You may use any fruit. In my opinion, bilberries, blueberries or raspberries are best. Cherries would also be excellent, but you may use your favourite fruit.

      Ingredients:
      crumble topping:
      50g of butter
      50g of flour
      50g of sugar
      1 tablespoon of sesame seeds
       
      whip:
      200ml of aquafaba (from one tin of chickpeas)
      150g of white chocolate
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      30g of caster sugar
      other ingredients
      fruit
      caster sugar

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking sheet with baking paper.
      Make the crumble topping. Make a smooth dough with the ingredients. Make a ball with it, roll it out flat and put it on the baking paper. Bake for 10-15 minutes until it is golden. Cool it down and crumble it.
      Melt the chocolate in a bain-marie and leave it to cool down a little. Whip the aquafaba and sweet cream with caster sugar in a separate bowl. Mix them together. Add the white chocolate and stir thoroughly but gently. Put the chocolate whip into some small bowls and leave in the fridge for 2 hours.
      Put the crumble topping onto the chocolate whip. Decorate with the fruit and peppermint leaves.

      Enjoy your meal!
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×