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schaem

Kitchen and Cooking Footwear/Shoes

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Kim:

Get your blood sugar checked.  My first sign of diabetes was foot discomfort - a feeling like I had socks bunched up under my feet.

I'm sure it's nothing, but you need to be sure!

Yeah, I was going to say--there are a number of health problems which feature foot discomfort as an advance warning symptom. It may just be the footwear, but it doesn't hurt to eliminate other possibilities as well, even if a change of shoes does provide some immediate improvement.

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I think I've found the perfect combination, which I used yesterday while I was setting up today's sausage-o-rama and last night's Thai dinner: Dansko clogs and New Balance cross-trainers. (I've got simian-width feet.)


Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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Kim

Been there, had that, wear New Balance.....In a professional setting sneakers last about 3 to 4 months only, when the whole front of the shoe bows up and you can rock them toss 'em. See a podiatrist to make sure theres no issues at the Plantar area of the foot, or calluses in creases and get orthotics ( assuming you have some insurance). I actually got rid of Plantar fasciitis with orthotics. I wear NB 620s and just bought my first pair since leaving food service 8 months ago after 20 yrs in it...1/2 size smaller because all the swelling has gone away.

Good luck feet are an investment

tracey


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

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Put me in the Dansko column. As for socks, I recommend some sort of runners' socks: thin, seamless, and made of that wet-wicking stuff. They should serve only to protect your feet from rubbing against your shoes all day long. Even if you're in running shoes, this will make a big difference.


"Oh, tuna. Tuna, tuna, tuna." -Andy Bernard, The Office

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Not sure that this is the right place for this, but here goes:  I work on my feet all day and my feet are sore :sad: .  Also, my socks are adding to the problem.  I thought that some of the folks here who also stand for a long time could offer some advice!  I wear a thick soled New Balance cross trainer shoe and thick athletic crew socks (Nike).  The socks seem to get little 'folds' in them or I start to feel like they are, anyway.  I also start to get the feeling that there is grit inside my socks, but when I shake them out, there is nothing there  :huh:  :huh:  :huh:?  Can anyone help me with this?  Thanks!

I live in birkenstock sandals year round. My concession to winter is to add socks. I've had the same problem with cotton socks and this winter I bought a pair of birk boots on e-bay to try and thy sent along a nice pair of socks. They are merino wool, not itchy at all, completely ccomfortable, don't bunch and don't make my feet hot or sweaty at all.

I've bought a few more pairs on e-bay since. Look for smartwool socks, they have a band around the instep that keeps them in place.

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i love my rubber birki work clogs. they make them in steel toe as well!

i also have wide feet and they work like a charm. i tried dansko clogs but they end up hurting my feet...also if your toenails are not perfectly clipped, you slide forward into the shoe and it puts pressure exactly on your toenail (at least for me).

with the birkis, you can just replace the insoles when they stop giving you usual support.

i don't like sneakers in a kitchen environment because they usually don't give you any traction at all...very dangerous if you're trying to move fast!

i also have a pair of leather birkenstock work shoes (sort of like the london or tokyo...can't remember which model). i sometimes switch out the rubber for the leather to give my feet a break. also if i work particularly long hours, i change my socks...it really refreshes your feet.

and finally...some people swear by support hose to relieve fatigue in the legs. good for avoiding varicose veins as well. i've never worn them, but probably should have while i was working in kitchens as i now have tons of spider veins. not too attractive :hmmm:

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Hi Kim.

What you are describing sounds like 'altered sensations' often caused by nerve problems. Is it just the ball of your foot? There is a condition called Morton's neuroma, which people describe as the feeling of a crumpled sock under the ball of the foot.

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There are several conditions that can cause abnormal sensations in the feet. Morton's neuroma is one that is fairly easily diagnosed. My boss, an orthopedic surgeon, would simply place a wide strip of tape, fairly tightly, all the way around the foot, just behind the widest part of the foot, where the metatarsal heads line up, then ask the patient to try to stand on the ball of the foot with the heel off the floor about 2 inches. A shock-like sensation will shoot into the 3rd and 4th toes if a neuroma is present. People who have this have a lot of difficulty wearing high heels.

I have a sensation in my right foot like there are cotton balls under and between my toes and this is due to ruptured discs in my back between L3-4 and L4-S1 pressing on the nerve roots where they exit through the foramina. I fractured the L4 vertebra and blew out the discs above and below it. When this first happened in April '04, I had severe pain in my entire leg and the muscles became very weak because these are motor nerves that are affected. I can't get my heel off the floor on the right.

Diabetes can be very tricky. I have it but have yet to develop diabetic neuropathy, which affects the circulation. My internist says that one of the first signs this is developing is loss of the little patches of hair on the toes over the first phalanges. In fact, I think this is being taught to pedicurists because he says he has had several patients referred to him from one beauty salon where this was noticed by the pedicurist. Tingling, burning, numbness, a feeling that ants are crawiling on the feet or a feeling that little bubbles are popping under the skin, and feelings of flushing or chilling (with no change in room temp) can all be signs of diabetic complications.

Plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the fascia on the sole of the foot can produce a number of symptoms, some rather weird - oddly enough, when this first begins to affect the foot, one has difficulty walking on arising from sleep - after walking about for 15-20 minutes, the symptoms subside and later in the day, after extended periods of weight bearing, the soles of the feet feel numb.

Many years ago, when the "Earth shoe" first appeared, we saw a lot of people in the office with foot symptoms that magically cleared up when they resumed wearing regular shoes, without the "negative" sole where the heel was lower than the forefoot. This stretched the Achilles tendon as well as the nerves that are routed through the tarsal tunnel - I am sure you have heard of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome - this is caused by stretching the nerves in the wrist the same way.

My boss said the "Earth shoe" was a great boon to podiatrists who would often operate on feet that really only needed a change in footwear to "cure" the problem.

Oddly enough, I just saw some similar shoes in the Herrington catalog. Everything old is new again!

A well-kept secret, is this company Sierra Trading Post

They sell name-brand shoes at a deep discount and there is no problem with returns and exchanges - they send a return label along with every order. Often the size selection is limited. They buy stock from stores that are going out of business and end of season stock from retail stores as well as distributors and manufacturers.

I have bought numerous shoes and boots from them and so has my daughter. We both have a wide forefoot and very narrow heel and few styles fit really well. For rapidly growing kids, it is a great resource.

However they also have a large selection of clogs and a huge selection of athletic shoes and sandals.

They have a lot of Birkenstock styles.

I am extremely partial to Mephisto shoes and when I saw they now have the Bretta, I ordered a pair in red and a pair in black patent (already bought the black leather locally). Huge bargain! And these shoe wear forever - I have a pair that is 20 years old and still look nearly new.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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After trying all of the usual suspects, a bought a pair of MBTs. They are very expensive, and worth every penny. Because of the design of the sole (by some European engineer) you are forced to stand with perfect posture. I have never felt so much strength, and at the end of 14 hours on my feet, I have absolutely no ankle pain.

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Thanks, everyone! Unfortunately I cannot wear the crocs - I checked with my boss today and shoes have to be closed in all the way around. The shoes for crews sound good and are closed in, too. Thanks also for the blood sugar concerns - I am a diabetic, but since losing weight I have normal sugar levels - I get checked regularly and do my own stick tests also. I think that my socks are all cotton, so I think that I will try the hiking socks, too. I really appreciate all the good information, folks!

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I used to work in a field where I was on my feet all day long, and someone I met there once gave me invaluable advice - no matter what kind of shoe you wear, they'll hurt if you're standing in them for significant periods of time. He said to bring two different pairs of shoes, and to switch halfway through. Worked like a charm.

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Kim,

Here's another recommendation for socks. Although they are described as a "dress sock," this is a poor description, in my opinion. They are knee highs, made from a combination of cotton, nylon and lycra, provide great support to the leg and do not slide down. The fact that they're made from "organic" cotton is irrelevant to me. I swear by them because of quality and comfort. I've purchased at least a dozen pair over the past year and wear them with all types of shoes -- clogs, athletic shoes, boots, etc. They don't wear out, either. I still have the first pair that I bought about three years ago. Whenever I buy cheap socks, they wind up in the garbage after a few months. The search for shoes, on the other hand, is a never-ending quest.


Ilene

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andie:

Thanks for that great explanation.

Sorry to hear about your back pain. Do you find it interferes with your ability to cook for long periods of time? I am recovering from foot surgery and can't be on my feet much at all. I miss cooking. :wacko:

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andie:

Thanks for that great explanation.

Sorry to hear about your back pain.  Do you find it interferes with your ability to cook for long periods of time?  I am recovering from foot surgery and can't be on my feet much at all.  I miss cooking.  :wacko:

I can't stand for very long. I have a powered chair with an elevating seat, for when I have to spend much time at the counter, otherwise I sit at the table I had moved into the kitchen when I didn't renew my commercial certification.

Right now I am even more limited because I messed up my knee and am supposed to be on crutches if I have to do any walking. I was doing so well until this happened, it is really a bummer. I was just getting up from my chair at the office and my right foot slipped on a piece of paper I didn't see and took all my (considerable) weight on my bent left leg. I have a partial tear of the quadriceps muscle attachment at the outer half of my left kneecap.

At first it was very swollen, now it is in technicolor.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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... He said to bring two different pairs of shoes, and to switch halfway through.  Worked like a charm.

This is sound advice indeed -- and any trade show veteran will tell you the same.

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My mother keeps about 4 pairs of shoes under my desk at work. She's always changing them. That works for her. Crocs work for me. It's one of those, you gotta try it to see what works best for you situations.

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So I am going to be in a kitchen trailing for a few days, any reccomendations for shoes (hopefully soon I willa ctually find a job in one). I dont want to spend a lot of cash, I know should spend money for feet...., so any suggestions. Is it pretty much crocs? I have almost flat feet and tend to wear new balance with orthotics. The shoes need to be closed toe, but thats it. Any shoes I could actually wear outside of kitchen without being embarassed, Im still young, would be a bonus. But hey if theyre cheap enough...


Edited by saltylj (log)

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saltylj, I also have flat feet and have found Crocs or Holey Soles work for me. I suggest Holey Soles - basically the same as Crocs (they used to be made in the same factory, and they're now suing each other for copying each other) but usually can be found cheaper. www.holeysoles.com

Most of the other Crocs-style brands are not made from the same compound, and are more slippery and/or wear out faster.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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saltylj, I also have flat feet and have found Crocs or Holey Soles work for me.  I suggest Holey Soles - basically the same as Crocs (they used to be made in the same factory, and they're now suing each other for copying each other) but usually can be found cheaper.  www.holeysoles.com 

Most of the other Crocs-style brands are not made from the same compound, and are more slippery and/or wear out faster.

I checked them all out, and in the end found Keens to be pretty comfortable, to my detriment as they were more expensive. Does anyone else wear these on a regular basis?

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Sorry to resurrect this post, but I've been wondering what kind of clogs Thomas Keller wears (ever since reading the Reach of a Chef.) Does anybody know?

Over here at Johnson and Wales, the standard issue for shoes is a pair of Grabbers, a leather shoe. I gotta say that they're pretty comfortable, although I've never tried anything else. I just ordered a brochure from Dansko and might try them out a little bit, but unfortunately, you have to wear the standard issue shoes in class.

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Ive got rather large feet (size 15 american, 48 Euro ) and Ive been havin a hard time findin comfortable kitchen shoes that are nonskid, durable, and safe. I used to wear boots but they were killing my knees, and now I wear crocs, which I LOVE, but they dont make them in my size without holes. Also the tred wears out after 3 months to the point where its a slip n slide in the kitchen. I was told to check Sanita's but they only go to 14, and I looked at Dankso and they do make a size 48, but from what Ive been told is that they run a size small. Does anyone, especially if you have large feet, have any suggestions on 1.) the best kitchen shoes in your opinion, and 2.) where do I find large size reliable shoes.


"Its never to late to be what you might have been" - George Elliot

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After trying all of the usual suspects, a bought a pair of MBTs.  They are very expensive, and worth every penny.  Because of the design of the sole (by some European engineer) you are forced to stand with perfect posture.  I have never felt so much strength, and at the end of 14 hours on my feet, I have absolutely no ankle pain.

Glad to hear you are liking them because I just sprang for a pair. I'm really excited about them but have yet to wear them all day. (Edited to add: oops, I see this post is a year old. I should ask if you still like them. No; don't tell me if you don't; they were too expensive.)

I'm very fond of Dansko-- the sandals even more so than the clogs. You can run in those sandals. :wub: For clogs, I recently discovered Ariat. They have great arch support and are more flexible than Dansko.

I find running and tennis shoes the absolute worst for standing.


Edited by Tess (log)

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Ive got rather large feet (size 15 american, 48 Euro) and Ive been havin a hard time findin comfortable kitchen shoes that are nonskid, durable, and safe.
Try here.

So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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