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Kitchen and Cooking Footwear/Shoes


schaem
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I used to have back problems.

Switched to closed heel Sanitas and never looked back.

My back woes have been banished.

I *can* (and do) wear wear crocs but no more than a day or two running; more than that and my back hurts.

Flattish feet here too.

YMMV. I'm not a chef but do spend many hours a day on my feet @ work. I gravitated to the Sanitas as I felt that clogs designed for folks who work half again as much as I do might be worth a try. Several pairs @ a year or so each later I'm sold.

Edited by 6ppc (log)

Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

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Flat feet usually means that you need to wear orthotics.

Q: When you get up in the morning, the very first time you put weight on your feet, what does it feel like?

Cooking professionaly since '84. Diagnosed with flat feet in '98, survived a serious bout of plantar facscitis from '03 to '06--all the while working 10 and 12 hr days.......

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Ditto on the Danskos, but I like the ones that have the closed back. I also have orthotics that I always wear in them. I'm very happy with the result.

I made a mistake when I bought my first pair and bought them too small. When they fit correctly, they're pretty loose.

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I tried Danskos once, but couldn't get used to them. I wear Crocs for my catering projects, but I'm always looking for other ideas. Got a link for Sanitas?

I have very flat feet and severely overpronate; I've been wearing orthotics since my teens and they can be a pain to fit into clog-type shoes; I don't wear them with the Crocs, but it doesn't seem to matter.

"Life is Too Short to Not Play With Your Food" 

My blog: Fun Playing With Food

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I tried Danskos once, but couldn't get used to them. I wear Crocs for my catering projects, but I'm always looking for other ideas.  Got a link for Sanitas?

I have very flat feet and severely overpronate; I've been wearing orthotics since my teens and they can be a pain to fit into clog-type shoes; I don't wear them with the Crocs, but it doesn't seem to matter.

Here's a link for the Sanitas: clicky

Jon

--formerly known as 6ppc--

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Virtually all my foot , leg and back issues were solved by wearing Birkenstock clogs and doing some daily foot stretches.

My problem is that I do not like their style. So I look like a nerd in the kitchen but I can go all day and night and not worry about how my lower body will feel the next day. Maybe I should have a stylish pair of something to slip on before going to the dining room.

Using 2 pairs of cotton socks at a time seems to help too.

Take care of those dogs.

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Flat feet usually means that you need to wear orthotics.

Q: When you get up in the morning, the very first time you put weight on your feet, what does it feel like?

Cooking professionaly since '84.  Diagnosed with flat feet in '98,  survived a serious bout of plantar facscitis from '03 to '06--all the while working 10 and 12 hr days.......

well, i feel pain of course.

i got used to my crocs to be honest, but it could be better.

my footmark is completely flat like a pancake. my mom told me the doctor said that i have flat feet when i was a kid, had some heal support thingies (dont know the english work) for a while, but nothing for the last 15 years (i am 28 now)

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  • 3 months later...

i think i'm the only person who can't stand Danskos. i've tried them multiple times, but they just feel too top heavy for me and my ankles tend to roll out. even worse, my back kills me after just a few hours of wearing them.

been through multiple pairs of both Crocs and Shoes For Crews brands, but both seem to feel a bit cheap and i hate how the soles wear out after just a few months.

these blundstones sound nice, but i bet they got hot in the kitchen after several hours. the z-coils might be good for a bad back like mine, but i can already here the ridiculing.

so, i'm still on the lookout for a strong, supportive, back-friendly well-made shoe.

the CrocsRx look cool -- anyone have experience with those? until i know more i can't justify shelling out $120 online to a company whose materials are cheaply made.

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Ive got some crocs and i love them, the only thing that makes them better are some smartwool socks. a bit hot but they wick the moisture away and provide much better cushioning than regular socks

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Ive got some crocs and i love them, the only thing that makes them better are some smartwool socks. a bit hot but they wick the moisture away and provide much better cushioning than regular socks

Bridgedale and Patagonia socks are even nicer ... will last longer without flattening out.

Something that would help almost everyone's feet--not just foot abusers like cooks--is a good set of orthotics or supportive insoles. There are few off the shelf shoes that have any significant arch support. I like the ones made by Sole. I bought them for hiking and climbing boots, and now use them in every piece of footware i have.

For a step up, there are stores that fit people in running shoes and ski boots that can mold firmer insoles to your exact arches. A step up from these (if you still have problems) is prescription orthotics.

Notes from the underbelly

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Toufas,

If the first thing your feet feel is painful when you get out of bed, then you need to see a podiatrist- a foot doctor. You most likely will need orthotics--little plastic inserts in your shoes.

For these to work properly you need solid shoes--one of the tests is to hold the empty shoe, gripping the heel with one hand and the mid-slole with the other and trying to twist/flex the sole. If it remains rigid or doesn't flex much at all, it is a good candidate for orthotics.

There's a couple of billion people out there,and each one has different feet, some are health and strong, others (like mine) aren't. There is no one-allpurpose shoe for everyone that works ideally.

That being said, a couple of notes:

Feet prespire, leather and most fabrics breathe, vinyl and other man-made leather imitations don't. Bad things happen when feet prespire in vinyl shoes with no ventilation.

Building on to the above, damp socks will abrade the lining of your footwear. Polypropelne socks are great, so is changing your socks every 6 or 8 hours

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I'm interested in blundstones (i've wanted a pair before I even knew they were popular in kitchens). Do cooks use the regular ones, or do they have a special kitchen model? are they at all hot? Do they favor a particular foot shape?

I love my blundstones. Been wearing them (same pair) since November of 07. Fourteen hours plus a day 5, 6 days a week and still going strong. Comfortable, Very good non slip and I don't have to change out of dorky kitchen shoes after work. I wear the regular 550. Bottom line is that I feel safe in these shoes and it's one less thing I have to worry about.

BTW.. The Aussie website has much better info regarding saftey.. some of the model numbers are different but at least they give you that info.

http://www.blundstone.com/product_info.cgi...tegoryID=130278

Arturo

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  • 7 months later...
  • 2 years later...

Has anyone tried working in Vibrams, Lemmings, or other barefoot-style shoes? I had back surgery a few years back, changed my shoes to vibrams (or truely being barefoot) plus stretches, exercise and have had no pain since. Now that's hard to pin down to any one solution but I'm pretty sure form all the research I've done shoes are a key culprit.

I know they offer zero protection against spills and falling cutlery, but they also provide outstanding slip-avoidance. I took cooking classes in Thailand barefoot (as was everyone else including the instructor. You wash your feet at the door.) and found myself swift, cautious and appreciative of a clean, less careless cooking approach everyone took.

I'm starting culinary school, and worried all the good work I've done for myself will be undone by long hours with traditional shoes.

"Gourmandise is not unbecoming to women: it suits the delicacy of their organs and recompenses them for some pleasures they cannot enjoy, and for some evils to which they are doomed." Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin

MetaFooder: linking you to food | @foodtwit

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  • 1 year later...

This topic is probably due for a fashion update.  What's the latest in commercial kitchen footware?  

 

I do avg 12-14 hrs a day on my feet, small kitchen and definitely not stationary.  Right now I'm using Shoesforcrews.com with their sporty kitchen shoe which has the best cushion I've ever had, but my heel is ripping them up.  Clogs have never worked for me because of my sprinting around.  New or old suggestions?

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Sorry I can't help with commercial kitchen information, but reading through this thread just prompted me to order a pair of Dansko.  However I have very narrow feet and I am prepared to be disappointed.  I was planning to get New Balance for the kitchen and around the house since NB is the only company I know who can fit my feet.  If the Dansko don't work out I will probably order NB.  I need something.

 

One factor about the Dansko in the kitchen (other than the fact that these are open toe) -- I am tall and the counters and stove are already on the low side.  Because of my feet I am not supposed to wear flat shoes (although I often do).  The Dansko look like they have a good heel but because of the platform I'm going to be standing taller than necessary.  Fortunately I have a work surface on a kitchen cart that is high, and I could make higher still.  That does not help with the stove unfortunately.  I had wanted to get a cushioned floor mat for in front of the stove but that would make me even taller.

 

 

Edit:  spelling.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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6 years ago in this thread I asked about Blundstones. I've got 3 pairs now and love them. Non-slip industrial soles, good protection, and they look good. Not exactly fashionable, but they're classics kind of like doc martens or chuck taylors. I wear them to work, out at night, and have worn them cooking all day at home or the occasional times i've cooked in commercial kitchens. 

 

They're my most comfortable shoes. Not a ton of support, but plenty of room for insoles or orthotics. Also good in the rain and snow.

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Notes from the underbelly

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My Dansko pair came today.  So far they are comfortable and I am pleased.  The Dansko are heavier than I expected but that is not much of a problem.  The heel is higher than I am used to wearing.  I was delighted that they fit my orthotics.  I was not expecting that!

 

Not yet tested in the kitchen beyond reheating last night's pizza.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 year later...

Thought I would check in a year later. Love my Bludnstones still (see above) with my ShoesforCrews insert. Not sure if the insert is anything special but its doing great. The only wear I'm having is on the heal of the shoes, but its cosmetic, not structural. I rotate my shoes depending on if I'm foraging or going straight to the kitchen, and I definitely feel the difference at the end of the day. So, good investment. My days still average 12 hours mas o menos.

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