Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
vengroff

Firefly

Recommended Posts

Thanks for the notice...gives me a chance to come in for one last ragu before welcoming spring!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The Old Thyme Martini is 75% Bombay Safire, 25% Vermouth,  a bit of Derek's homemade orange bitters and a sprig of thyme.  It tasted like the spa.  Clean and mentholy.    It's stirred, not shaken.  I don't love gin, but I admit,  I found it to be a pretty classy little drink.

I'm not a gin fan either, but Derek whipped up one of these for me recently, and I agree. Tasty.

I didn't think a Bourbon Slipp could last 90 minutes. Doesn't that violate the laws of physics or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been one for fancy cocktails; however, Mrs. Busboy let me have a sip of her Espresso Martini and I had to order one for myself. The funny thing was how very different my reaction was from that of Babka. She thought it was just AWFUL and I thought it was the best-tasting thing ever. Go figure.

'Course, I'm still trying to figure out whoever dreamed up such a lovely thing, much less came up with a recipe.

So, the rest of you can think of squash soup or lamb when you think of Firefly: I'll go there for an Espresso Martini. :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have tried faithfully to recreate the Espresso Martini upon request, but the original recipe comes from Kelli Walbourn of Palena. The best Espresso Martini is from Palena, made by their lead bartender Jeff.

I've never been one for fancy cocktails; however, Mrs. Busboy let me have a sip of her Espresso Martini and I had to order one for myself.  The funny thing was how very different my reaction was from that of Babka.  She thought it was just AWFUL and I thought it was the best-tasting thing ever.  Go figure.

'Course, I'm still trying to figure out whoever dreamed up such a lovely thing, much less came up with a recipe.

So, the rest of you can think of squash soup or lamb when you think of Firefly:  I'll go there for an Espresso Martini. :blink:


“Let us candidly admit that there are shameful blemishes on the American past, of which the worst by far is rum. Nevertheless, we have improved man's lot and enriched his civilization with rye, bourbon and the Martini cocktail. In all history has any other nation done so much?”

Bernard De Voto (1897-1955) American writer and critic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just got a newsletter from Firefly highlighting "Sparkling Brunch." And I quote:

Sparkling Brunch

Join us for our new "Sparkling Brunch" every Sunday from 11am-2pm. In addition to Chef John Wabeck's new and improved menu, we will be featuring 7 sparkling cocktails made from four different Champagnes and sparkling wines. The bubbles will also be available by the glass or in flights of three for tasting.

Kir de Luxe

Luxe Sparkling Wine and Crème de Cassis de Dijon

$12

Secouez-Moi

Champagne, Cointreau and OJ

$14

Spanish Mimosa

Cava, Gran Duque d’Alba Brandy and OJ

$10

Red Velvet Swing

Port, Cognac, Champagne and a Rose Petal

$14

Champagne Cocktail

Champagne, Bitters and a sugar cube

$12

Bellini

Prosecco and Crème de Peche

$10

French 75

Champagne, Brandy, Simple Syrup and Lemon Juice

$12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any word on when the new menu will be on the website????

Edited to add--It's up on their website now!!!!

Jennifer


Edited by bookluvingbabe (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm interested to know about the new menu as well. I've checked the website over the past couple of days, and the menu currently posted today is different from what was up a few days ago, but with what seems like minor variations to the same dishes rather than anything completely new (although my memory could be failing me.) Also, I find it strange that the new menu would be listed as "Winter 2005." I'd think anything being introduced now would be called Spring 2005.

Don't get the wrong idea, I'm not complaining, but since I have reservations there for Friday night, I'm just trying to understand what to expect. I have eaten off of the "old" menu before and loved every last bite of it, but still, I was excited about the prospect of being one of the first to try a completely new menu.

Does anyone have any insight? John W? Thanks!

Looking forward to that Bourbon Slipp on Friday night...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change half now, half in about 6 weeks or so when it's actually spring. The menu is getting to the point where certain things can't come off. When it gets to the point of 100% untouchable I'll change soups via e-mail from my estate in the Minervois.

The menu is labeled Winter 2005 because it's Winter 2005.


Firefly Restaurant

Washington, DC

Not the body of a man from earth, not the face of the one you love

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The menu is labeled Winter 2005 because it's Winter 2005.

Oh go ahead and rub it in


Oh, J[esus]. You may be omnipotent, but you are SO naive!

- From the South Park Mexican Starring Frog from South Sri Lanka episode

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want the wine list IM-ed to my mobile phone, please.


...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks John.

Like I said, my memory of the previous menu was a bit fuzzy, so I wanted to make sure I was looking at the current one so I can properly daydream about my choices for this Friday. No intent to be picky or difficult. Now that I peruse it again, I do realize there are a few dishes that don't seem familiar. That crab stuffed trout is sounding pretty intriguing... Although with the weather still this wintry, I may have to go with the pork ragout that I've been dying to try.

Sounds like a no-lose decision either way and, if i can get my dining companion there early enough, I may have time to sit at the bar and ponder it over a second (or third) bourbon slipp and some oysters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks John.

Like I said, my memory of the previous menu was a bit fuzzy, so I wanted to make sure I was looking at the current one so I can properly daydream about my choices for this Friday.  No intent to be picky or difficult.  Now that I peruse it again, I do realize there are a few dishes that don't seem familiar.  That crab stuffed trout is sounding pretty intriguing...  Although with the weather still this wintry, I may have to go with the pork ragout that I've been dying to try. 

Sounds like a no-lose decision either way and, if i can get my dining companion there early enough, I may have time to sit at the bar and ponder it over a second (or third) bourbon slipp and some oysters.

It also looks like the lamb minute steak has morphed into a lamb sirloin.

JPW and I are meeting there for a drink after work this eveing and can report back more extensively on the changes. Looks like some new stuff on the appetizer menu as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd love to get reports on the cornmeal dumplings.

Hubby and I have Friday night reservations....

Jennifer

Get them. You will be happy. Very happy. Very very happy.

Not that I've been out too much recently, but these are my favorite new app of 2005.

Good call Derek.

Another loverly wine happy hour. Thanks to all.

John, could you PM the name of that Bordeaux you were pouring last night?

And a final special thanks to jparrot for his addition to the evening.


If someone writes a book about restaurants and nobody reads it, will it produce a 10 page thread?

Joe W

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'd love to get reports on the cornmeal dumplings.

Hubby and I have Friday night reservations....

Jennifer

I would not have called them "cornmeal dumplings." They are three cornmeal disks topped with portabella mushrooms with some sauce underneath. You can pick them up and eat them sort of like a crostini. The green sauce underneath has a kick to it. I would rate them equal to the fried oysters. Damn good. Thanks Derek. And thanks Jake for the tastes of the S. African wines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dinner on Friday at Firefly:

The great:

Bourbon Slipp--a damned fine cocktail (and despire Derek's claims, it lives up to the hype...)

Cornmeal Dumplings--Wow!!!!

Spring rolls--still as fine as ever.

Bittersweet panna cotta -- as near to perfect as a chocolate dessert can get

The good:

The roasted chicken--absolutely perfect chicken and frites; the mushrooms and bacon didn't work for Mr. BLB.

The "Why did you change it????":

The lamb sirloin--it was nice but it was noticebly smaller than the old lamb minute steak, I missed the chard, and I thought the new version of the mac and cheese was too soupy.

Please note that this reaction may simply be ME reacting badly to change....

Despite that, I can't think of a better way to spend a Friday evening after a particularly lousy week at work.

Jennifer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had my first Firefly lunch today...and must note:

Derek is just as dreamy at lunchtime!

Oh, the food was good too.


Edited by JennyUptown (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think Landrum's leveraging the Ray's brand? You should see where Wabeck's taking his. It's all about hooking them young.


"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did you get one for Stretch, Jr. yet?

A follow-up question for JohnW:

I had the pleasure of trying the new cornmeal dumplings with mushrooms at my recent lunch. Neither my dining companion nor I are people who often order mushrooms to be honest, but we tried your dish and really liked it.

But if memory serves, you're allergic to mushrooms, aren't you? What was the development of that dish like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The "Why did you change it????":

The lamb sirloin--it was nice but it was noticebly smaller than the old lamb minute steak, I missed the chard, and I thought the new version of the mac and cheese was too soupy.

Please note that this reaction may simply be ME reacting badly to change....

Despite that, I can't think of a better way to spend a Friday evening after a particularly lousy week at work. 

Jennifer

May I suggest that you try it again? I really enjoyed the minute steak, but I'm on the flipside re: the lamb sirloin. I think it rocks. The kitchen whacked it in half for me and the Mrs. to split tonight and not only was it cooked to absolute medium rare perfection, the sauce was bread soppin' good. Give it another shot. If it doesn't work for you, at least we can agree on those cornmeal dumplings! And a Bourbon Slipp or two.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you get one for Stretch, Jr. yet?

A follow-up question for JohnW: 

I had the pleasure of trying the new cornmeal dumplings with mushrooms at my recent lunch.  Neither my dining companion nor I are people who often order mushrooms to be honest, but we tried your dish and really liked it.

But if memory serves, you're allergic to mushrooms, aren't you?  What was the development of that dish like?

The development was as follows...Needed something to finish the menu, was looking through old menus from New Heights days. The dish was called the more correct sopapillas back in the day, but since we're an American Bistro (sic) we call them dumplings. Wrong on many levels, but you have to duck behind the concept when banging out Mexican food. I have not tasted finished product, but when my cooks crush out the leftovers at the end of the night, I guess it works.


Firefly Restaurant

Washington, DC

Not the body of a man from earth, not the face of the one you love

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Edit: Not funny, or clever.


Edited by iamthestretch (log)

"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Did you get one for Stretch, Jr. yet?

A follow-up question for JohnW: 

I had the pleasure of trying the new cornmeal dumplings with mushrooms at my recent lunch.  Neither my dining companion nor I are people who often order mushrooms to be honest, but we tried your dish and really liked it.

But if memory serves, you're allergic to mushrooms, aren't you?  What was the development of that dish like?

The development was as follows...Needed something to finish the menu, was looking through old menus from New Heights days. The dish was called the more correct sopapillas back in the day, but since we're an American Bistro (sic) we call them dumplings. Wrong on many levels, but you have to duck behind the concept when banging out Mexican food. I have not tasted finished product, but when my cooks crush out the leftovers at the end of the night, I guess it works.

When cooks bang out or crush out a cuisine, how would you say their saucing tends to be?

Heavy-handed? Also, what dishes are better smashed out than crushed or banged out?


...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When cooks bang out or crush out a cuisine, how would you say their saucing tends to be?

Heavy-handed?  Also, what dishes are better smashed out than crushed or banged out?

When I crush out a cuisine, the saucing definitely tends to be heavy-handed, overflowing even. But that's me.

When a dish is really fine, it is best to first smash out, then crush out. You don't want to leave anything undone. Save banging out, however, for staff meals.

Don't you agree John?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When cooks bang out or crush out a cuisine, how would you say their saucing tends to be?

Heavy-handed?  Also, what dishes are better smashed out than crushed or banged out?

When I crush out a cuisine, the saucing definitely tends to be heavy-handed, overflowing even. But that's me.

When a dish is really fine, it is best to first smash out, then crush out. You don't want to leave anything undone. Save banging out, however, for staff meals.

Don't you agree John?

Do you at least snuggle afterwards?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...