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Suzi Edwards

Cooking with Kiwi Fruit

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Does anyone have any ideas about what to do with kiwi fruit? My organic box scheme delivers them every week, we never eat them and now i have 20.

I have tried juicing them (which was ok, quite refreshing with sparkling mineral water added....but it means the juicer is a nightmare to clean.

So, any ideas for uses for them?

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:shock: Geez, I would be burned out by now! You could mix it with strawberries (classic combo of kiwi strawberry) or mango to make a shake or puree. Also fresh fruit tarts with pastry cream come to mind. Can you reduce the order or does this up the price? Often at the bakery we just buy a few kiwis a week for the tarts. They take a while to ripen, so I would get just a few if you are going berzerk with kiwi. Choose like an avacado. Firm but yields to gentle pressure.

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mayapple   

I was going to recommend Pavlova as well. And smoothies. But my favorite thing to do with a perfectly ripe kiwi is to cut in in half, dig out the flesh with a spoon, and eat. I love kiwi.

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Kiwis are attractive, and you can do all kinds of complicated things with them, but when it comes down to it, they're just a piece of fruit. Like most other pieces of fruit, you can just eat them. Cut them in half across their midsection and eat them with a spoon.

Quickest way to do them in.

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Rhea_S   

If you have an extra tough piece of meat, you can tenderize it with mushed up kiwis. I don't know how long you leave the meat in the kiwis since I've never tried this, but I do know that you can't leave it in for too long. It ends up the texture of liver.

(I just realized this is the pastry and baking thread -- meat pie?)


Edited by Rhea_S (log)

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sandra   
Kiwi won't set in mousse, might not work as a jam either.

Here's a recipe I have made and it sets fine...

kiwi mousse

I can translate if you need it...

I don't know about jam, that I have never made, but I have seen it in jars...

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sandra   

Also, from Waitrose Food Illustrated I just got: Kiwi Ice Cream

let me know if you want the recipe...

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I think it is papaya that doesn't set and is a tenderizer. Kiwi mousse sounds good, but on what?

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sandra   

Well, we were taught that almost anything sets with enough gelatine, sometimes you have to cook it first, like pineapple, papaya, whatever -

Kiwi mousse, I piped it into stemmed glasses with chopped strawberries halfway up and then again on top - you can macerate the strawberries if you like -

You could line a ring mold with a strip of sponge cake and then fill to the top with the mousse and then put a kiwi jelly on top - more fancy... you could also just cut a slice of pound cake and drop a dollop on top.

You could also sweeten the kiwi puree and serve it as a sauce withice cream...

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pchef   

Kiwi and other tropical fruits have enzymes that break down gelatin. That is why people don't like to use them. If you want to use fresh juice from these fruits, you need to boil the fruit juice first and then let it cool. The heat will deactivate the enzymes and the gelatin should set just fine.

Pchef

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Mcfly   
Kiwi won't set in mousse, might not work as a jam either.

Here's a recipe I have made and it sets fine...

kiwi mousse

I can translate if you need it...

I don't know about jam, that I have never made, but I have seen it in jars...

What langauge is that Kiwi Mouse in?

Can you translate it for us Sandra? If you could give us the Kiwi Ice Cream recipe as well that would be great!

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sandra   

Mcfly,

The recipe is in French... I translated the ingredients directly, but instead of the vanilla sugar packet I just pour in a bit if vanilla in with the egg yolks -

Preparation: 15 minutes

Chilling: 2 hours

Cooking: 10 minutes

4 Servings

Kiwi Mousse

2 eggs

400 gr kiwis

60 gr sugar

1 packet vanilla sugar

Separate the eggs and whip the whites to hold strong peaks.

Peel the kiwis, chop roughly and pass through food processor.

In a pan over low heat, bet the egg yolks with the sugars until the mixture is light in colour. Add the kiwi pulp and cook 10 minutes, stirring continously.

Remove from heat and gently fold in the egg whites.

Pipe or spoon into individual ramekins or moulds and chill about 2 hours.

Serve decorated with kiwi slices.

Iy comes out as a soft mousse, it won't hold up a cake, but it looks nice in a flute or stemmed bowl...

As for the ice cream, I just meant ice cream with kiwi puree over it, no specific recipe

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helenjp   

kiwifruit does work in jam. I like to make it in the microwave, to keep the color bright. I use quite a lot of shredded fresh ginger with it -- ginger and kiwi are an AMAZINGLY wonderful combination!

Kiwifruit chunks in pound cake go nicely too...lots of apple desserts work with kiwifruit.

Regards

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LJC   

Fruit salad with strawberries, mango, banana, papaya and fresh mint.

I have had some great desserts made with kiwi but I don't know how they are made. Here are two and maybe others can tell you how to make them.

One is from Vong (or maybe Jo Jo; long ago): kiwi and mandarin milk marmalade napoleon. This was layers of phylo crisps coated with a condensed milk yum and then thin sliced kiwi.

An other was from Bid (Chika Tillman): lavender poached kiwi I think it was a dessert amuse bouche (sp?)

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have just stumbled across a Lindsay Bareham recipe in a recent (London) Evening Standard for green fruit salad with lime + avocado cream. hmmmm. have a slight feeling the plate would resemble a mosaic of Kermit the Frog but... you could try it?

Fi

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You can preserve the kiwi in the same way you would pineapple. Take two quarts pealed, coursely chopped kiwi fruit, a pinch of salt, and 4 cups of sugar. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring constantly, until the temperature reaches 240 degrees. Remove from the heat. Drain the liquid into a saucepan, reserving the fruit. Bring the liquid to a rapid boil and cook until reduced by half. Add back to the fruit and run the whole lot through a food mill. Use between layers of a cake, as a topping for a sundae, or as a sauce for plated desserts. I like it on buttered toast. Freeze extra for up to 3 months.

I know this will sound like I'm daft, but I also made a wonderful kiwi chutney, using less than half the sugar, a bit of vinegar, onions, garlic, chopped coriander, and lots of red pepper. It was stunning with coconut chicken stips as first course.

I know fresh kiwi, like fresh pineapple, somehow interferes with gelatinization. Does anyone know if cooked kiwi will gel? I'm sure McGee has something to say about it, but mine is at home right now.


Edited by Comfort Me (log)

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