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Lamb Shank


Richard Kilgore
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Sear and braise. Mire poix, white wine, a bit of rosemary and garlic. Serve with mashed celery root, pea with mint soup.

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Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Sear and braise with chopped prunes, stock, red wine, a little unsweetened chocolate, thyme. Roast green beans with olive oil and garlic, boiled new potatoes.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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Just last night I made the recipe in Ruth's Reichl "Tender to the bone". It's basically a can chopped tomatoes, 6 cloves garlic, 1 cup water, 1 T oregano, 2 T EVOO, salt and pepper sauce, braise the shanks for an hour turning every 15 min., then add 2 cups orzo and 2 cups water and bake for another 20-30 min. until pasta is done. The recipe is for 4 shanks. Delicios.

The human mouth is called a pie hole. The human being is called a couch potato... They drive the food, they wear the food... That keeps the food hot, that keeps the food cold. That is the altar where they worship the food, that's what they eat when they've eaten too much food, that gets rid of the guilt triggered by eating more food. Food, food, food... Over the Hedge
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Braise, Braise, Braise!!!

Season w/ salt, white pepper and EVOO sear till golden.

Add a few chopped plum tomatos, smashed garlic cloves, sprigs of rosemary.

A small amount of cabernet and some beef, veal or lamb stock.

cover and braise for 3+ hrs.

Good stuff!

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Braised Lamb Shanks were one of the dishes that really got Margot's noticed in the early days.Its not a dish we do as much now, but it always makes me smile, because we still get guests mention them fondly :biggrin:

Yes we seal in a hot hot tray before braising ( drying off the marinade first).I tend to stick a rosemary stem down the bone.Red wine , Olive oil, garlic, bay , onions in the marinade, and then use the marinade + red wine+ lamb stock to cook

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Leslie Revsin's new (due Sept) book - Come for Dinner - has an excellent recipe for lamb shanks. That dish may well be the subject of her eGCI course on October 2nd - watch the eGCI Course Announcements.

Gerhard Groenewald

www.mesamis.co.za

Wilderness

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  • 4 years later...

Does anybody roast lamb shanks? I've always braised them, but wonder if a long, slow roast would be good. I'm cooking a few this weekend, and will braise 3 of them . . but I'd like some thoughts on roasting the 4th.

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I've never made it, but Nigella Lawson roasts lamb shanks. The recipe is here I would think that if you were roasting lamb shanks, you would want to keep them pretty rare or they could be tough. But anyway, give it a try--if they're way too tough then just consider the roasting as the browning phase of a braising recipe and simmer them for a while.

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Thanks for the link. I wasn't thinking rare, I was thinking well-done. Like braising, just without the moisture. Nigella's recipe calls for cooking at 400 for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Temperature seems high, but the shanks look good. I might have to try her recipe.

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I don't get 400F for 60-90 minutes, so, yeah, go for it. Or, if you can get two, do another (after a sear) at, say, 250F for a couple, three hours.

Whichever method you use, I worry that the lack of braising liquid in a roast will make for some tough shank. I mean, are there any classic recipes out there for roasting any mammal shanks at all?

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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I'm quite sure I have read about roasted shanks in the Larousse Gastronomique. The copy here is really old and I don't actually know where it is, otherwise I'd look it up.

Why not do the sous vide thing? SV lamb shanks . . . tasty and fashionable.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

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Moe Sizlack

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They're great braised; it's also my favorite cut for soups. Practically impossible to overcook. I make over and over again based on a James Peterson recipe ... a Moroccan tagine-style lamb soup with tomatoes and dried apricots. Shanks would be perfect for any lamb soup.

Notes from the underbelly

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I made lamb shanks last week, Braised in a Bolognese style sauce. The leftovers were even better the second day; pulled the meat off the bone, returned it to the sauce and tossed it with cooked penne. Just too good.

I've never thought of roasting them as they're so good braised.

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Does anybody roast lamb shanks?  I've always braised them, but wonder if a long, slow roast would be good.  I'm cooking a few this weekend, and will braise 3 of them . . but I'd like some thoughts on roasting the 4th.

I put them in a roasting pan with aromatics, cover, start at 500 degrees and reduce to 325 after 1/2 hour (but I am not pre-heating oven). They release moisture as do the aromatics. Once they are cooked but not yet falling off the bone, I continue un-covered until they reach that perfect state with broken down connective tissue lending great mouth feel. I enjoy them with a small orange sliced up into the aromatics or a glug of pomagranate juice to sort of cut the lambiness. Overall time depends of course on the size of the shanks.

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Whichever method you use, I worry that the lack of braising liquid in a roast will make for some tough shank.
That's my worry. And yet I will forge ahead.
Why not do the sous vide thing? SV lamb shanks . . . tasty and fashionable.

'Cuz I wanna roast one. First of all, I'm curious. Second, I'm wondering if they can be substituted in the classic rack with bread crumb and herb crust. I'm not going to try that this time -- but shanks are half the cost of the racks, so I want to give it a shot.

I always roast lamb shanks.  Then again I try to buy those with a fair amount of meat on them.  The really skinny ones probably would be better braised

Ted

Could you share some of the details? My shanks average 500 g (just over 1 lb.), so they have some meat on them.

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