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42390

Alsace Restaurants

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I will be working in Stuttgart in September and am hoping to visit some of the

starred restaurants in Alsace. Can anyone provide recommendations on

the following?

Julien, 1 star, Strasbourg

Vielle Enseigne, 1 star, Strasbourg

Cerf, 2 star, Marlenheim

Auberge du Cheval Blanc, 2 star, Wissembourg

and in Germany:

Restaurant Bareiss, 2 star, Mitteltal

Schwarzwaldstube, 3 star, Tonbach

I have seen plenty of postings about Auberge de l'Ill, Buerehiesel & l'Arnsbourg so I am

curious about some of the lesser known place in Alsace.

Thanks

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Nothing compared with the auberge dI'll


Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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I have a lunch reservation at l'Auberge de l'Ill on 27 September and am looking forward with great anticipation.

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The owner is very old but he goes from table to table at the river bank where you have your apertifs to greet you. I think a special touch. But, Alas I was disapponted we could not eat outside in that beautiful setting.


Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly....MFK Fisher

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Julien, 1 star, Strasbourg

Vielle Enseigne, 1 star, Strasbourg

I passed by both Julien (which is being renovated) and Vielle Enseigne this weekend. Both looked very nice and the menu at Vieele Enseigne looked fab.

I heartily recommend Au Fer Rouge (in Colmar), where I ate one of the great meals of my life last Sunday.

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I've spent three weeks each of the last 3 Decembers on eating trips through Alsace, so I can share a few observations (and photos) with you.

I ate at Le Cerf twice this past December. It's an absolutely fabulous resturant. The food is exciting and delicious. Photos of the chef's Truffle Menu can be found here Le Cerf truffle dinner. We had the Poached egg on Piedmontese polenta, over a coulis of spinach and ricotta, covered with black truffle shavings to start, followed by the large ravioli of smoked and poached duck foie gras in pot-au-feu bouillon, covered with black truffle shavings , and then the Penne pasta in an aged Parmesan cream sauce with aged Iberian black prosciutto, roast juices, covered with black truffle shavings. Everything was spectacularly delicious. On the previous visit we had the same two first courses but for the main plate we had the roast wild duck with chopped duck hearts and livers on toast. Also rather spectacular. I didn't have the pasta offering the first time, thinking that I hadn't come to France to eat pasta. But the meal was so wonderful that I felt I had to come back the next week and have the complete truffle menu, including the pasta. And I have to say that I cannot remember ever eating a dish that was so culinarily exciting, and so rewarding to eat. I don't necessarily like invention for inventions's sake, but I'd been in search of culinary thrills, and finally found them here. This was definitely more culinary genius, but in a delicious and satisfying way, than I've ever found at a 3-star place. The chef turns out to be a warm and hospitable person, and you can certainly taste this in his cuisine. Highly recommended for culinary thrills and gastronomic satisfaction.

In complete contrast was a meal at Auberge de L'Ill. The gastronomic "menu" there consisted of all the right things (truffles, foie gras, lobster) but tasted like food that's prepared in advance and served on an airplane. It had no vibrancy, no life, no excitement whatsoever, and the lobster with mushrooms was actually too poor tasting to eat. (I've had a similarly disappointing meal at other 3-star restaurants, and then again, wonderful meals at others.) I'd have to say that in nine weeks of dining in Alsace this was the least good food we had.

We also had a perfectly nice meal at Julien in Strasbourg, although if you're seeking great dining I don't know that I'd recommend this as anything other than just nice. (Also, the portions at Julien were of the tiny, one-bite size, and I like a little more to sink my teeth into.)

Thanks to the Michelin's new "bib gourmand" symbol, I've discovered two restaurants that serve exceptionally good food, and I'm not sure why they're not awarded a star: Au Chasseur in Birkenwald, right near Le Cert, and Faude in the mountain village of Lapoutroie, about 20 minutes up into the Vosges above Colmar. But if you're willing to try other than starred restaurants, you can have some great eating at these places, and you can preview their cuisne here...

Faude food photos

Au Chasseur food photos

I've been to Faude dozens of times, and this is reflected in the photos. The food is truly delicious, and so varied that it requires many return visits. Everything there - the regional dishes and the "gastronomic" creations, are just top notch. I've been to Chasseur twice but the photos are not updated to reflect more than the one fabulous meal. (If your interests include wine, Au Chasseur has an utterly fabulous cellar, which they're quite famous for, and the Bordeaux and Burgundies they serve absolutely live up to the cellar's reputation. This one's a must for food and fine wine.)

I've never eaten at Buerehiesel, but I can tell you that one year while dining at Faude we struck up a conversation with a French couple from Strasbourg who seemed quite knowledgable in cuisine, and when I mentioned I'd be going to Auberge de L'Ill in a few days, told me that it had been resting on its reputation for years and was lousy, but that Buerehiesel was wonderful. In that they called the Augerge de L'Ill perfectly right, I'd be inclined to believe them about Buerehiesel.

Hope this helps you find some great dining in Alsace.


Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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markk - Thanks so much for this information. I was wondering about Le Cerf and will now add it to my dining schedule.

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Now that I think of it... after our second meal at Le Cerf, Michel Husser, the chef (and owner) invited us into the kitchen to take photos, and we got to talking. (He also unwrapped the "Pata Negra" ham from Spain that was the focal point of the main course so that we could get solo pictures of it, and in general he turned out to be the nicest fellow imaginable, especially as one by one he brought out the various ingredients, including the black truffles, for close-up photos.) I mentioned that I was going to give up on 3-star restaurants after my horrible meal at Illhaeusern, and he said that the restaurant north of them in Alsace that had recently been awarded their third star, was superb. I don't remember it by name, but in looking at the guide, I do believe it is L'Arnsbourg, in Untermuhlthal, near Baerenthal. This recommendation works for me!


Overheard at the Zabar’s prepared food counter in the 1970’s:

Woman (noticing a large bowl of cut fruit): “How much is the fruit salad?”

Counterman: “Three-ninety-eight a pound.”

Woman (incredulous, and loud): “THREE-NINETY EIGHT A POUND ????”

Counterman: “Who’s going to sit and cut fruit all day, lady… YOU?”

Newly updated: my online food photo extravaganza; cook-in/eat-out and photos from the 70's

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42390: to quote: "... I will be working in Stuttgart in September and am hoping to visit some of the

starred restaurants ....... 'in Stuttgart' " , (my add-in)

Restaurant Wielandshöhe , Owner/Chef Vincent Klink ,

Alte Weinsteige 71

D-70597 Stuttgart-Degerloch

Telefon 0711 - 640 88 48

Telefax 0711 - 640 94 08 I know Chef Klink since '87. Talk to him, I don't think you will go wrong.

http://www.wielandshoehe.com/index14.php

And another: "Speisemeisterei Schloß Hohenheim"

D-70599 Stuttgart, Ortsteil Hohenheim (Owner/Chef Martin Oechsle)

(07 11) 4 56 00 37

Also hit a few places in Freiburg, if time permits. My dad lived there for over 20 years.

"Dattler" a true Cafe and Konditorei, get there by Gondola, high above the rooftops of the city: http://www.dattler.de/

Also tops: Colombi - Restaurant

Am Colombipark

D-79098 Freiburg im Breisgau http://www.colombi.de/


Peter

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I'm planning a weekend in Alsace at the end of October and since I am not that familar with it, I am looking for recommendations. I think we will stay in Strasbourg on Friday night and then will move to a village along the wine route for the next two nights. I'm taking the train from Paris and a friend is driving from Switzerland.

Any suggestions for a restaurant in Strasbourg on Friday night? A hotel?

And then where would you stay after? Colmar?

Merci!


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

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I had the opportunity to visit the following Alsace restaurants last month:

Auberge de l'Ill (3 star)

Le Cerf (2 star)

Auberge du Cheval Blanc (2 star)

Au Crocodile (2 star)

Among this list I would eagerly return to all except Crocodile. I may have ordered poorly, but

just did not think it was equal to the others. Le Cerf is only 10 to 15 miles to the west of

Strasbourg and would be a great spot for dinner. The cooking there is very good, as chef

Husser trained with Bocuse, Haberlin and Senderins. The dining room, however, was the least

elegant in the group listed above. There is an attached hotel, but I did not stay there.

Auberge du Cheval Blanc was also wonderful. It was harder to find, as it is located way out in the

country in a town named Lembach, way north of Strasbourg. They had an attached hotel too,

but I did not stay there either.

Perhaps the best discovery of this trip was not in France but right across the Rhine in

the Black Forest. I had dinner at the Restaurant Bareiss (2 star) located in the Hotel Bareiss

in the town of Mittletal-Tonbach. The Germans here out did the French at their own game,

serving up meticulously prepared classic cuisine. It is probably 40 miles east of Strasbourg and

well worth seeking out.

Each of these (except Bareiss, I think) has their own web site showing their current menu. Dinner ran about 140 euros (food,wine,water,coffee) at each of these except Auberge de l'Ill where lunch was closer to 170.

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I'm planning a weekend in Alsace at the end of October and since I am not that familar with it, I am looking for recommendations.  I think we will stay in Strasbourg on Friday night and then will move to a village along the wine route for the next two nights.  I'm taking the train from Paris and a friend is driving from Switzerland.

...

And then where would you stay after?  Colmar?

Felice,

To a certain extent, in Strasbourg you do pretty well at most holes in the wall. You'll end up with decent choucroute... Which, aside from the well star-ed fine dining options, should be why you are eating in the area.

I once ended up at an all cabbage dinner just outside of Strasbourg, and now know far too much about both cabbage dishes and the history of cabbage in the area. (Either that or what I think I know is all wrong, as the whole thing took place in French.) Long story short: eat the cabbage in its many forms.

As for where to go after, abuse you friend and head to Basel (Bale). It's less than 90 minutes away by train, and you end up with a whole different kind of food. I am pa fan of Rosti, the potato pancake with an egg and ham on top.

-Little Blue


Edited by The Little Blue House (log)

----------------------------------------------

Emily in London

http://www.august18th2007.com

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I have a lunch reservation at l'Auberge de l'Ill on 27 September and am looking forward with great anticipation.

Do write about it.

Bruce

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A starred restaurant that is not to be missed in Alsace is:

Restaurant Le Cygne in Gundershoffen (30 minutes north of Strasbourg).

It's got 1 michelin star and the food is magnificent.

If you like inventive food

L'Arnsbourg in Untermulthal (near Baerenthal) is _fantastic_.

3 michelin stars. The Chef, Jean-Georges Klein was a cook at El Bulli with Ferran Adria.

He's learned from his master, that's for sure ....

Now, if you like _classic_ french cuisine:

L'Auberge de l'Ill

Auberge du Cheval Blanc

will not surprise you but present impeccable food. They're not my favorites, though.

I think the best restaurant in Alsace (IMHO) is the Buerehiesel.

Antoine Westermann is a genius.

Enjoy!


"Je préfère le vin d'ici à l'au-delà"

Francis Blanche

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Do write about it.

I will be happy to relate my experience at l'Auberge:

I drove to Illhaeusern using driving direction printed out from the Via Michelin web site. It is a tiny

little town but I found it without too much trouble. As you drive through the main street through

Illhaeusern, as soon as you cross a bridge over the Ill, the Auberge is immediately to your right.

Upon entry I was warmly greeted and asked if I would like to sit in the garden while reviewing the

carte. How could one refuse? The garden is fabulous, reaching from the back of the house down to

the banks of the Ill. Willows bend down to the water's edge, beautiful flowers are in abundance,

some swans were passing by in the river, fishermen were leisurely plying the river in narrow

wooden boats. The setting here is stunning.

I was seated at a table in the garden, ordered champagne, and the carte was brought out. Two

amuse were served in the garden. The carte features a section devoted to dishes that helped build l'Auberge's reputation over the years (salmon souffle, truffe sous la cendre) along with some more

modern offerings. Two fixed price menus were available, one for 108 euros and another called the

menu Haberlin for 135 euros.

I settled on the 108e menu and made the following choices:

Truffled terrine of foie gras (one of their signature dishes), wine: vendage tardive gewurtztraminer

Turbot in crustacean broth, wine: local riesling

Medallions of lamb in "habit verte", wine: volnay

Cheese

Chocolate cromesqieu, wine: banyuls

I do not have my menu with me now, so I regret that I am not acurately relaying the names

of these dishes. I asked for wines by the glass to accompany each. Another amuse was served

in the dining room, then the real food began to appear.

The terrine of foie gras was presented at the table then a portion was scooped out onto a plate

and presented at my table. This was a simple yet highly delicious dish. It was served with

toasted bread that was unbelieveable good. I guess details like the world's best toast is

what gets you three stars.

The turbot was cooked with skin crispy, flesh tender and juicy. The crustacean broth was appropriately

smooth and rich. This dish was quite good too. A few days before, however, I had something

very similar at Auberge du Cheval Blanc, and I think their's was a bit better, but I can't say

why.

The lamb medallions in habit verte were with pistacio crust. The meat was cooked perfectly rose,

served with potato puree with black olives and baby vegetables. This dish was experrtly prepared

but, as with much of what you get here, not cutting edge cooking.

The cheese cart was spectacular. I took a degustation of chevre, five different goat cheeses in various stages of affiniation along with roquefort, munster, and cantal. Some fig bread was served with the

chevre and it was extrordinarily good.

After cheese a tray of tuiles, miniature fruit tarts, and macrons arrived, soon followed by the main

dessert. The chocolate cromesqieu was very dense chocolate preparation encased in thin pastry

that had been carmelized and was very crunchy. It was served with a fine vanilla ice cream.

After all this I moved back to the garden for coffee. I tool a seat at a small table immediately at

the edge of the river and sat back to enjoy a spectacular late summer afternoon. The sky was

clear and blue, the small river Ill peaceful. With coffee came various chocolates and some small

balls of praline ice cream that were dipped in bitter chocolate.

I arrived for lunch at 12:00 and left at 5:00. The total price was 169 euros. I would go again, no

question, if the opportunity arose. The cooking here is not cutting edge by any stretch, just

expertly prepared classic cuisine in a wonderful, almost bucolic setting. The Haberlin family is

everywhere. Daddy Haberlin, who I am guessing must be over 80 years old, made his way

through the gardens and dining rooms greeting guests, for instance.

When I left, I asked for a menu, and they eagerly gave me a copy of the 108e menu I had

ordered from as well as the carte. This was an exceptional afternoon.

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