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maggiethecat

eG Foodblog: maggiethecat - Ta duh ta duh ta duh ta duh ta duh

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Foodblog: Sonnet I

When I considered how my lunch was spent

Reheating pasta tossed with cheese and mint

(Or breakfast butter spread on toasted rye)

For something fresh and sweet my soul did cry.

So out I dragged the Krups and poured within

Some fruit, eggs, sugar, cream (a tot of gin)

I churned it up, lost in my happy dream

Of scoops of lemon /strawberry ice cream.

A bright blue bowl of tiny new potatoes…

A salad red with radish and tomatoes.

What did we quaff with Tokany veal stew?

Two brimming steins of frosty Pilsner U.

It's hard enough my daily meals to plan,

Shit! Now the food I choose must rhyme and scan.


Edited by maggiethecat (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Poetic terms, and fictional,

Describe your fine repast.

To read about your victuals

Will make the day go fast.


--

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Maggie's poetry,

descriptive, food-laden, it

makes my mouth water.

K (time for lunch!)


Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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I thought I might respond to this in verse

But my attempts just went from bad to worse

Pray tell what went into the stew of veal?

mamster's on the prowl for his next meal


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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I prefer Elizabeth Bishop and Sharon Olds, no offense. :blink: Hell, even Robert Pinsky in all his T.S. Eliot-esque glory.

All this meter makes me think of trochees and dactyls....

*ERK!!!*

OTOH, its kind of fun in a weird kind of way.

Soba


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

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I thought I might respond to this in verse

But my attempts just went from bad to worse

Pray tell what went into the stew of veal?

mamster's on the prowl for his next meal

Dear Mamster: IP can make your brain rattle after awhile, and it's addictive. At least it is to me. (Yes, I've spent a day or twenty of my precious Biblical span thinking in nothing but limericks. It's a damn sickness!) So it's a joy to write in prose right now.

Tokany of veal is a Hungarian stew, using the usual Hungarian seasoning suspects. Sautee two pounds of cubed, floured veal shoulder in a mixture of butter and oil. Remove. Sautee three chopped onions, add a sliced green pepper, 2 sliced carrots, and 3 chopped tomatoes. Add a cup of white wine, cover. Let 'em sweat for ten minutes. Add the veal, 1 T. paprika, s&p, 1/2 t. marjoram, a cup of beef stock (or chicken, or veal), bring to boil, turn down to simmer...bubble gently for 45 minutes.

And, in keeping with this month's theme, blanch 6 ounces of chopped BACON, sautee until golden. Add to the pan. Cover and simmer for 20 more minutes.

Ten minutes (or so) before serving, add 1/2 pound chopped shrooms. Just before serving, stir in a cup of sour cream and heat through, very very gently.

It's a winner, courtesy of the terrific, and of course, out of print, "Larousse Treasury of Country Cooking."


Edited by maggiethecat (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Hoorah. Love Elizabeth Bishop even more than WCW. Can't think of anything relevant to quote, but had to mention.

Veal stew for dinner very soon, I now think.

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That sounds wonderful, maggie. I just inherited some issues of Fine Cooking, and one of them has a recipe for a veal soup called Soup of the Bakony Outlaws. Apparently Bakony is a region of Hungary, which was disappointing until I noticed that there is also bacon in the soup.


Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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I was thinking of "The Fish" and "Ariel" actually.

"Stasis in darkness."

That sort of thing...heh.

Soba

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Apparently Bakony is a region of Hungary, which was disappointing until I noticed that there is also bacon in the soup.

LOL.

Hmmm I'm wondering...I'm not an expert on Hungarian cuisine. Anyone know if the veal/bacon combo is a standard in the land of the Magyars?


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Sonnet II

A dearth of bacon wrecked my breakfast plans

So…heck! I nuked some oatmeal from McCann’s.

For lunch a grilled cheese sandwich, (Brie on rye)

Sliced apple framed its fearful symmetry.

Mark Bittman gave us skewered chicken thighs

That made us coo “whoa babies!” and “Oh, mys”

You’ll find it in (what else?) the New York Times:

Take curry, fresh cilantro, a few limes

With coco milk they soak (and dare I utter?)

The dread, despised and silky peanut butter.

Long beans in bean sauce (hot!) and plain boiled rice:

Damn good, but here I offer some advice:

Your appetite is dulled---(Don’t take no wizards!)

The road to hell is paved with DQ Blizzards


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Sliced apple framed its fearful symmetry.

Aahh, Blake.

For some reason I love him...


Edited by polly (log)

How sad; a house full of condiments and no food.

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Alas, alak, no bacon in the house

Maggiethe cat sat quiet as a mouse

Oh poor Maggie, our poet laureate

Poor dear, in her little black dress, sat, wept.

Diet based on rhyming pentameter

Will so seriously limit her

Eggs and bacon and that special breast milk

Leaves one kegs and legs and Macon to bilk

We are left to wonder when Lou will rail

Leaving Maggie to dump all in a pail.

(begging pardon for the one out of iambic pentameter line)


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Maggiecat, you rock.

Word.

:wub:


Noise is music. All else is food.

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Coconut mild was a real pain.

:laugh::laugh:


Noise is music. All else is food.

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And, in keeping with this month's theme, blanch 6 ounces of chopped BACON, sautee until golden.

I thought the theme of EVERY month is bacon. A month without bacon is like a month without, well, I dare not utter it.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Our maggiethe cat has been so quiet

Probably pondering her diet

How to pentameter all of her rhyme

Without using too much of precious time

Oh do tell us all of what you ate

On this very glorious August date

Be it plebian or pedestrian

Or if you again used that wonderous gin


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Sonnet III

My breakfast plate was nothing like the fun

Of eggs and bacon...but I had to run

For bistro lunch with dearest girlfriend Kat

Decided steak and frities were where it's at.

Alas, the onglet which I'd ordered rare

Arrived all grey within, to my despair.

I sent mine back and chatted with my pal,

Who ate hers grey (she's such a pleasant gal.)

We talked of children, hair and mice and men

(She needs a cat!) ...dessert came, and Amen!

Profiteroles were really, truly great

I gave her half of mine;too big a plate.

When Magz came home to dinner, fish had found her:

A plate of breaded, pankoed TJ's flounder.


Edited by maggiethecat (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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