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When Last did a Recipe Surprise you?


maggiethecat
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Buy the book. :smile:

Amen.

But, for a fast and dirty version of the real recipe:

Oven:400.

Make a thick bechamel using 6 T. butter, six T. flour and two cups cold whole milk. Let it thicken nicely, and come to a rolling boil. Turn off the heat and allow to cool for ten minutes.

Butter a six cup souffle dish. Grate 6 ounces of gruyere (or white cheddar!) Chop 3 tablespoons of chives. Beat five extra large eggs (He says with a fork, I used a whisk .)

Add the cheese, eggs, chives and salt and pepper to the bechamel, stir to mix. Fill your souffle dish, and pop into the oven for forty minutes or so--until puffy and golden.

And there 'ya be!

Edited by maggiethecat (log)

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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Matthew, how was the peppermint?

Well, last night I was tired & feeling a bit blue.

So, I made cheeseburgers. (I was reminded how much better Roquefort is on burgers than Stilton. I'm not punning above about the blues.)

Tonight is the peppermint pasta. I'll report tomorrow.

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Jason . . . I hate to say this, but . . .

to me (not that I would know, of course :rolleyes: ), it looks like there's one big honkin' hairy piece of cannabis in the upper left-hand side of your pasta bowl.

Is it Rasta Pasta?

:huh:

Noise is music. All else is food.

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it looks like there's one big honkin' hairy piece of cannabis in the upper left-hand side of your pasta bowl.

It's a shame to refer to that thing as cannabis. :sad:

If you wanna see some real buds, pick up the Dudley Perkins album & check out the gatefold. :shock: (CD gatefold has it, too.)

Edited by MatthewB (log)
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it looks like there's one big honkin' hairy piece of cannabis in the upper left-hand side of your pasta bowl.

It's a shame to refer to that thing as cannabis. :sad:

If you wanna see some real buds, put up the Dudley Perkins album & check out the gatefold. :shock: (CD gatefold has it, too.)

The only bud worth consuming.

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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Back to food . . . :blink:

I made the Bittman dish with peppermint last night. Sure, there's a difference between spearmint & peppermint. And I would prefer spearmint for this dish. However, it was still great with the peppermint & I wouldn't hesitate to make it this way again. (What is it about mint, butter, & parmesan that's do appealing to the palate?)

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Thank you Matthew and Maggie for bringing this recipe to my attention. I've made it twice and it's going right into the regular rotation :wub:

Sometimes When You Are Right, You Can Still Be Wrong. ~De La Vega

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Isn't there a theory that noodles, or pasta, actually developed somewhere in the Middle East, not China, and reached what is now Italy from there? Could be that noodles and mint are an ancient combo, with parmesan added later.

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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Isn't there a theory that noodles, or pasta, actually developed somewhere in the Middle East, not China, and reached what is now Italy from there? Could be that noodles and mint are an ancient combo, with parmesan added later.

Bittman notes the following in his column for this recipe . . .

"I was well into my eating career before I tasted a pasta dish containing mint. The combination is not commonly seen in this country, though there is mint in some of the tomato sauces of southern Italy, and there's an odd carbonaralike dish originating in Rome that includes eggs, butter, Parmesan, mint and, filling in for pancetta, zucchini.

Recently, a friend suggested making pasta with mint and Parmesan, and the pairing is a good one. There is something about the lightly assaultive yet somehow sweet nature of mint that is unlike any other herb. Older cuisines use it occasionally, but it is rarely seen as a major player."

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It doesn't surprise me that mint, pasta and Parmesan go well together. After all, mint and basil are closely related, and have flavors that, if not exactly similar, are within spitting distance of each other. There was some talk about basil lemonade (good stuff) in the lemonade thread not long ago; I had an amazingly good strawberry-basil cheesecake at Le Bec Fin on Saturday. So it seems like it could go in either direction.

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ItI had an amazingly good strawberry-basil cheesecake at Le Bec Fin on Saturday.  So it seems like it could go in either direction.

Andrew: You've got my full attention here: do go on.

Was the mint simply a garnish, or did it's flavour extend to the cake itself. Hmmm... strawberry/mint/cheese. That could really work.

(My mint has metastasised to the point where it's eating small mammals. )

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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ItI had an amazingly good strawberry-basil cheesecake at Le Bec Fin on Saturday.  So it seems like it could go in either direction.

Andrew: You've got my full attention here: do go on.

Was the mint simply a garnish, or did it's flavour extend to the cake itself. Hmmm... strawberry/mint/cheese. That could really work.

(My mint has metastasised to the point where it's eating small mammals. )

Think "Mint Strawberry Lemonade."

Edited by MatthewB (log)
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Jason . . . I hate to say this, but . . .

to me (not that I would know, of course  :rolleyes: ), it looks like there's one big honkin' hairy piece of cannabis in the upper left-hand side of your pasta bowl.

Is it Rasta Pasta?

:huh:

Its the mint flowers. Actually the tiny leaves are edible and quite tasty.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Bittman notes the following in his column for this recipe . . .

"I was well into my eating career before I tasted a pasta dish containing mint. The combination is not commonly seen in this country, though there is mint in some of the tomato sauces of southern Italy, and there's an odd carbonaralike dish originating in Rome that includes eggs, butter, Parmesan, mint and, filling in for pancetta, zucchini.

Recently, a friend suggested making pasta with mint and Parmesan, and the pairing is a good one. There is something about the lightly assaultive yet somehow sweet nature of mint that is unlike any other herb. Older cuisines use it occasionally, but it is rarely seen as a major player."

Mint and orzo is probably common in Greek food though. I recently had some. Came as a side dish with lamb chops.

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it looks like there's one big honkin' hairy piece of cannabis in the upper left-hand side of your pasta bowl.

It's a shame to refer to that thing as cannabis. :sad:

If you wanna see some real buds, pick up the Dudley Perkins album & check out the gatefold. :shock: (CD gatefold has it, too.)

But I'm not crazy, then.

YOU saw it, too.

EDIT: Jason, I just saw your post. I actually asked my teacher about this today at school, it had me so disturbed. :blink:

Carry on.

Edited by NeroW (log)

Noise is music. All else is food.

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(My mint has metastasised to the point where it's eating small mammals.  )

:laugh::laugh::laugh:

I had apple mint once (well... it had me). Small mammals were nothing to that beast. I almost lost a 75 pound basset hound. :laugh:

Never plant apple mint. It doesn't even taste that good.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Does fresh picked sweet corn, boiled but not adorned with anything because it is so wonderful count as a "recipe?"

If it is truly ' fresh picked' --- have you tasted it uncooked? Good corn is sweet and tender!

FYI: 'old' corn is starchy. :smile:

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  • 2 weeks later...
Last night I made "Maman's Cheese Souffle," from "The Apprentice", the Mommy in question being Jeannette Pepin.  As noted above, I was spurred to do this my my own Mummy's enthusiatic recco.  Because the man I live with doesn't much like eggs, this was a tough sell, but we're both glad I did it.

Did this souffle for the first time last night. Recommended.

Followed up a bit later with a pasta recipe from Bittman's HTCE: Fettucine w/ fresh herbs mixed into sauteed garlic & olive oil. Very easy & a great way to use up some of the herbs which have taken on a large life.

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  • 1 month later...
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