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Guinness on tap


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OK, so you're in Wazoo WV, Scalp Lick PA or even Las Vegas NV. You are feeling queasy, hung over, and out-of-sorts. You want a drink but the thought of anything but a smooth pint of Guinness gives you heaves.

We want to help you.

Please post locations to find Guinness on tap in unlikely cities and towns across the country (or world if you like), and comments on the quality if so inclined.

I'll start.

San Antonio TX: Durty Nellie's, 200 S. Alamo Place (on the Riverwalk)

quality: average

Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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There is an Irish pub--I can't remember the name--in the same complex as the Angelika Film Center in Dallas, TX. I went there with the British conductor of my show, who told the bartender that this was better Guiness than he gets in London. That seemed odd to me, until the bartender explained that their kegs came from Ireland, and most of the Guiness sold in England was made in England.

It was an excellent pint (or three).

My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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In the handfull of bars of little Sitka, Alaska -- none on tap.

Guinness in the can at The Pioneer Bar on Katlian.

In Cleveland, well, it's just about everywhere. Don't know about the quality in relation to that served in Ireland (or Northern Ireland), but I'll be sure to report back sometime in the near future! :cool:

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There is an Irish pub--I can't remember the name--in the same complex as the Angelika Film Center in Dallas, TX.  I went there with the British conductor of my show, who told the bartender that this was better Guiness than he gets in London.  That seemed odd to me, until the bartender explained that their kegs came from Ireland, and most of the Guiness sold in England was made in England.

It was an excellent pint (or three).

Well, you can tell that bartender that he's full of it. There are several pubs I can think of in London (the Coach & Horses in Wellington St being the most centrally located), that get the real stuff from Dublin.

BTW, did you fine Texan explain how long it took to import his casks, and how they were stored? Just interested to know how the yeast survived the transatlantic voyage.

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There is an Irish pub--I can't remember the name--in the same complex as the Angelika Film Center in Dallas, TX.  I went there with the British conductor of my show, who told the bartender that this was better Guiness than he gets in London.  That seemed odd to me, until the bartender explained that their kegs came from Ireland, and most of the Guiness sold in England was made in England.

It was an excellent pint (or three).

Well, you can tell that bartender that he's full of it. There are several pubs I can think of in London (the Coach & Horses in Wellington St being the most centrally located), that get the real stuff from Dublin.

BTW, did you fine Texan explain how long it took to import his casks, and how they were stored? Just interested to know how the yeast survived the transatlantic voyage.

Yes, of course.

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What exactly is the point of this thread?  Guinness is not exactly the most difficult beer to find.  It's also about as inspiring a stout as Bud is a lager.

I think the point was quite clearly explained in the first post. It obviously has little interest for those who don't enjoy Guinness, so what is the point of your interruption?

Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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What exactly is the point of this thread?  Guinness is not exactly the most difficult beer to find.  It's also about as inspiring a stout as Bud is a lager.

I think the point was quite clearly explained in the first post. It obviously has little interest for those who don't enjoy Guinness, so what is the point of your interruption?

The point is -- Guinness is pretty easy to find. It's pretty hard to find a bar that doesn't serve it. More to the point, you can just look for the nearest Irish place, which is a bit easier than pulling up a page in eGullet.

Now if you created a list of where to get real Engish cask ales or great Belgian beers in the States, that would be very useful.

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Guinness is good, but I like Boddingtons better

Looks good Jason, but I can't find anything about a Bodd's stout...

I've found a Bodd's Bitter, Manchester Gold (ale), Pub Ale, Boddington's Mild and Oldham Best (OB) Mild (a reddish brown beer).

No, boddingtons is not a stout, the closest thing they have is a bitter. Their pub ale is very creamy though, which is why I put it in the same category as Guiness even though its a different style.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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No, boddingtons is not a stout, the closest thing they have is a bitter. Their pub ale is very creamy though, which is why I put it in the same category as Guiness even though its a different style.

It's the Nitrogen ( a process they call Cream flow or slopwpour ). Guiness invented it as a way to make keg beer more like a hand pulled draft (Nitrogen makes smaller bubbles, more like air leading to a creamy head)

They now do it in the can with the "Widget" of Nitro.

Boddies used to be a great cask ale. Then Whitbread took it over and murdered it. However, with a small but growing number of exceptions it's as close to a cask ale as you are likely to be able to get most places in the USA. Cask ales require extensive cellaring and will spoil if not looked after as they are living ales.

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  • 3 weeks later...
The Brooklyn Brewery Dark Chocolate Stout, which is an imperial russian style is really kickass too, but they only make it during wintertime.

I love their dark chocolate stout, but it's too strong for a lot of people i talk to.

Herb aka "herbacidal"

Tom is not my friend.

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The Brooklyn Brewery Dark Chocolate Stout, which is an imperial russian style is really kickass too, but they only make it during wintertime.

I love their dark chocolate stout, but it's too strong for a lot of people i talk to.

I cant think of a smoother, softer stout than Brooklyn's BCS. Strong? Cmon.

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"

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  • 5 weeks later...

just a funny story...

Being in Utah, this shouldn't have surprised me much, but I was at a bar and I asked the bartender for a Black and Tan...much to my dismay when it arrived it was a pint of guiness and a shot of rum....hehe....I don't know if she expected me to mix the two or what, but I almost fell off my stool laughing....

"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

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  • 3 weeks later...

To those who love Guiness: Great pours at 1.The 6511 Club in Chicago and 2.Moctazumas on Whisky row in Prescott, Az. If you are in a hurry, go elsewhere, they draw a beautiful pint.

Do any of you remember GUINESS CREAM STOUT in 12 oz. bottles that required a sonic generator at the bar (or a good slam on a log) to release the foam/head? They were great!

To those who dislike Guiness: Perhaps you dont like stouts in general, then I pity you lol. Serious though, I would like to know of a better stout if it exists. I have enjoyed- Old Australian Stout, Xingu, Watneys Stout, XXX Stout, Old Peculiar, Boulder Stout, Murphys, ect...., but none have matched Guiness in my opinion.

So tell me of a better Stout than Guiness and I will gladly try it!

PS: I also had Guiness in bottles in Jaimaica (brewed on island) and it was quite good.

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  • 3 months later...
To those who dislike Guiness:  Perhaps you dont like stouts in general, then I pity you lol.  Serious though, I would like to know of a better stout if it exists.  I have enjoyed- Old Australian Stout, Xingu, Watneys Stout, XXX Stout, Old Peculiar, Boulder Stout, Murphys, ect...., but none have matched Guiness in my opinion.

At last, the voice of reason...

Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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The Gingerman at 2718 Boll Street in Dallas.

About 50 fresh beers on tap plus some bottled. Nice outside upstairs balcony for summer lounging. The nitrogen truck gets there in the early morning to refill the tank for Guiness.

Edited to provide link

Edited by Huevos del Toro (log)

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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