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Scott S

Favorite simple rum drink recipes?

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In my quest to because a rum afficionado (still in the wannabe stage) I've come across several rums which are good, but not good enough for straight sipping. (IMHO) I'm not willing to waste or ignore these rums, so I'm looking for some simple drink recipes. Simple in the sense that I don't wish to cover up or overpower the rum, but wish to smooth it and make it "more drinkable."

I'm not a rum & coke fan, and the rest of the rum drinks I know are things like Mai-Tai and Scorpions and such.

What do you drink when you wish to taste the rum, or aren't in the mood for drinking it straight?

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Daiquiris... No. Not. The. Frozen. Slushy. Kind. The cocktail. 2 parts light rum to one part fresh lime juice. Simple syrup or sugar to taste. Shake on ice, strain into chilled glass. Garnish with a lime wheel. If you want to get more complex you can do Hemingway or Floridita Daiquiris or venture into mojito land. I've found that if you use herba buena for your mint, you get a nice mint kick but can still really taste the rum in a mojito. A real mai tai is not a bad thing either, not those yucky juice things. I do 1 part golden rum, 1 part light rum, 1/2 part lime juice, 1/2 Cointrou, splash of almond syrup (or grenadine, but not too much). Shake on ice, strain into chilled glass. If you like you can float some dark rum on top, or not. Paper umbrella is optional.

regards,

trillium

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The Ti Punch, the Caipirinha or the Mojito are probably the best showcases for simple rum drinks.

Ti punch requires Rhum Agricole (white) but you could also do it with regular white or aged rum, but it wont taste exactly the same.

Caipirinha uses a brazilian cane liquor which white rum can be substituted.

A mojito can be made with white or aged rum.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I like a Rum and Tonic with a twist of lime.

Works with either white or dark, though I usually have white.

--mh


--mark

Everybody has Problems, but Chemists have Solutions.

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A Dark 'n Stormy.

I make it as more of a highball than a cocktail. Gosling's Black Seal is the official choice of rum, but I use whatever dark rum is at hand. Here's my recipe:

about 3/4 oz. dark rum

12 oz. bottle chilled spicy ginger beer (I like Goya)

Rose's lime juice

Pour rum over 1 or 2 ice cubes in pilsner glass. Add ginger beer & top w/ a bit of Rose's.

This is my favorite everyday rum drink. If you're not into spicy ginger beer, it's probably not for you. I've made it w/ milder ginger beers (like Saranac or the kind they sell at Trader Joe's) and it doesn't work. It's definitely a weak drink alcohol-wise. But for me, increasing the amount of rum ruins the perfect balance of tastes. Also, don't use fresh lime juice -- the sugaryness of Rose's is essential. When you get it right, you will experience the most fascinating progression of flavors.

If you're in the South, definitely use a local hot ginger beer. I have a soda-making friend in Bklyn who makes her own sometimes -- heavenly.


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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From "Notes on a Cellar Book" Saintsbury 1923

The recipe intended for real punch is as follows:-

Three parts rum

Two of brandy

One of lemon juice

and six of hot water.

I never knew this mixture found fault with by respectable persons of any age, sex or condition from undergraduates to old ladies, at any hour between sunset and sunrise.

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The Ti Punch, the Caipirinha or the Mojito are probably the best showcases for simple rum drinks.

Ti punch requires Rhum Agricole (white) but you could also do it with regular white or aged rum, but it wont taste exactly the same.

Caipirinha uses a brazilian cane liquor which white rum can be substituted.

A mojito can be made with white or aged rum.

How would a Ti punch and a Caipirinha be different if you made both with rum? Is a Ti punch light rum, a squeezed/muddled lime and simple or cane syrup with ice? Because the Caipirinhas I had were just that except cachaça instead of rum.

regards,

trillium

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A real mai tai is not a bad thing either, not those yucky juice things.  I do 1 part golden rum, 1 part light rum, 1/2 part lime juice, 1/2 Cointrou, splash of almond syrup (or grenadine, but not too much).  Shake on ice, strain into chilled glass.  If you like you can float some dark rum on top, or not.  Paper umbrella is optional.

Real is a strong word, especially in the controversial world of tiki drinks. I've got my issues with Trader Vic, but I don't think there's any question it was invented inside his establishment. Here's the story, and recipes, on the company website.

In a way I can see where this variation comes from, as long as you don't go for the grenadine, but without a unique flavor like the Martinique rum it ain't gonna work. This sounds like one I had in a Chinese restaurant in Wellesley, Mass. (But it was a Chinese restaurant known for it's good Mai Tais.)


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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The Ti Punch, the Caipirinha or the Mojito are probably the best showcases for simple rum drinks.

Ti punch requires Rhum Agricole (white) but you could also do it with regular white or aged rum, but it wont taste exactly the same.

Caipirinha uses a brazilian cane liquor which white rum can be substituted.

A mojito can be made with white or aged rum.

How would a Ti punch and a Caipirinha be different if you made both with rum? Is a Ti punch light rum, a squeezed/muddled lime and simple or cane syrup with ice? Because the Caipirinhas I had were just that except cachaça instead of rum.

regards,

trillium

I dont think Caipirinhas use turbinado sugar or cane syrup. All the recipes I know of call for just "sugar"

I think Caipirinhas use a lot more lime juice -- ti punch usually just calls for a squeeze of lime

Ti punch uses white Rhum Agricole... it definitely tastes different then regular white rum

Fundamentally though you are correct, the drinks are not that different.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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I second the Dark n' Stormy, although I use fresh lime juice instead...

I also like Rum Swizzles:

2 ounces dark rum

1 ounce lime juice

1 ounce pinapple Juice

1 ounce orange juice

1/4 ounce grenadine

shake of bitters

Shake with ice.

Strain into a highball glass filled with ice.

If you use common rum, it's fine - but if you use good rum, I like Goslings (again!) it really comes out nicely...


www.nutropical.com

~Borojo~

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This sounds like one I had in a Chinese restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.  (But it was a Chinese restaurant known for it's good Mai Tais.)

Babyluck which restaraunt is this? I haven't had a good Mai Tai in years, and I'm not that far from Wellesley.

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This sounds like one I had in a Chinese restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.  (But it was a Chinese restaurant known for its good Mai Tais.)

Babyluck which restaraunt is this? I haven't had a good Mai Tai in years, and I'm not that far from Wellesley.

Checked w/ my sister-in-law -- it's actually in Framingham, called Lotus Flower. I remember it being in a strip mall across the street from the furniture store with the Mardi Gras theme (that was a new one for me).

Now that you've cornered me though, I have to admit -- I certainly wouldn't make any claims to authenticity with their Mai Tai. I wasn't lying when I said it's known for them, but I was trying to soften the blow of the post. I didn't say it was known by tiki aficionados. I guess it depends on what you consider a good Mai Tai. Whether the emphasis is on the "good" or the "Mai Tai." It's not sickly sweet, tastes pleasant enough, and makes you happily tipsy. Good enough for me, unless I'm doing the mixing at home. Learned not to expect more when a bartender says he can make a "good" Mai Tai or a "good" Zombie -- it's all relative. I'm sure there's someone out there who would take issue with my versions.

That said, I loved the restaurant. There's some magic going on there. It could be any uppity sit-down suburban Chinese restaurant, but some combination of alcohol, good lighting & acoustics & yummy food makes it a special place where you're guaranteed to have a nice, relaxing time. It would be perfect for any size group, foodies/non-foodies, kids/couples, etc. I was only there once, but my BIL & SIL go there all the time and never had a bad experience. So go there anyway, but don't get your hopes up about the Mai Tai.


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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So go there anyway, but don't get your hopes up about the Mai Tai.

:sad:

Oh, well. I was really looking forward to a good Mai Tai.

I thought about it after I posted, and I'm not even sure that I want "a good Mai Tai" so much as I want a Mai Tai like they made at a particular Chinese restaurant I frequented many years ago. I have no idea how authentic they were, but it's what I grew up on, and thus they were good. I've tried at least 8 or 10 recipes, order some Trader Vic's Mix (blech) and missed Trader Vic's TWICE when traveling to Atlanta.

All I want is a Mai Tai like I had when I was a kid.

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So go there anyway, but don't get your hopes up about the Mai Tai.

:sad:

Oh, well. I was really looking forward to a good Mai Tai.

I thought about it after I posted, and I'm not even sure that I want "a good Mai Tai" so much as I want a Mai Tai like they made at a particular Chinese restaurant I frequented many years ago. I have no idea how authentic they were, but it's what I grew up on, and thus they were good. I've tried at least 8 or 10 recipes, order some Trader Vic's Mix (blech) and missed Trader Vic's TWICE when traveling to Atlanta.

All I want is a Mai Tai like I had when I was a kid.

Could you describe it? Maybe we can help reunite you.

First question -- color: red, pink, peach, tan, or other?


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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Could you describe it? Maybe we can help reunite you.

I'm not sure...

It was quite dark, but not to the extent of a dark rum. Not too sweet, and a touch of bitterness. I know the bartenders filled a glass with crushed ice, used a splash of pre-mix #1, a splash of pre-mix #2, white rum, dark-gold rum, then shook everything and returned it to the glass.

The "pre-mix #1 & #2" is an assumption on my part - they used the white plastic bar "bottles" for these, but they could contain anything.

From my experiments I've a strong feeling that the rum used was quite important, and I believe it may have been Ron Rico White, not sure of the Gold.

Please note that it's been about 15 years since I've had one from this restaurant.

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A real mai tai is not a bad thing either, not those yucky juice things.  I do 1 part golden rum, 1 part light rum, 1/2 part lime juice, 1/2 Cointrou, splash of almond syrup (or grenadine, but not too much).  Shake on ice, strain into chilled glass.  If you like you can float some dark rum on top, or not.  Paper umbrella is optional.

Real is a strong word, especially in the controversial world of tiki drinks. I've got my issues with Trader Vic, but I don't think there's any question it was invented inside his establishment. Here's the story, and recipes, on the company website.

In a way I can see where this variation comes from, as long as you don't go for the grenadine, but without a unique flavor like the Martinique rum it ain't gonna work. This sounds like one I had in a Chinese restaurant in Wellesley, Mass. (But it was a Chinese restaurant known for it's good Mai Tais.)

Would you be happier if I said a real cocktail instead of a real mai tai? That's more along the lines of what I meant. I guess I define a real cocktail as something that is balanced and not full of fruit juices. Vic himself suggested mixing dark and light rums to mimic the taste of the rum he ran out of for the original mai tais, didn't he? I'm not in the habit of drinking cocktails at the Chinese restaurants I frequent, so I make no claims of it's similiarity. I will say that I think using a nice innocent 17 year old rum along with Dekuyper orange curacao doesn't exactly lend a person the high moral ground when it comes to mixing! Of course, mai tais aren't exactly my favorite cocktails, so what do I know? I've had two in the last 11 years. One at Trader Vic's in SF (my first legal alcoholic beverage) and one more recently. I'll take a Daiquiri any day.

regards,

trillium

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So go there anyway, but don't get your hopes up about the Mai Tai.

:sad:

Oh, well. I was really looking forward to a good Mai Tai.

I thought about it after I posted, and I'm not even sure that I want "a good Mai Tai" so much as I want a Mai Tai like they made at a particular Chinese restaurant I frequented many years ago. I have no idea how authentic they were, but it's what I grew up on, and thus they were good. I've tried at least 8 or 10 recipes, order some Trader Vic's Mix (blech) and missed Trader Vic's TWICE when traveling to Atlanta.

All I want is a Mai Tai like I had when I was a kid.

I just realized -- you grew up on Mai Tais? Tequila shots got boring after the 3rd grade?


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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A real mai tai is not a bad thing either, not those yucky juice things.  I do 1 part golden rum, 1 part light rum, 1/2 part lime juice, 1/2 Cointrou, splash of almond syrup (or grenadine, but not too much).  Shake on ice, strain into chilled glass.  If you like you can float some dark rum on top, or not.  Paper umbrella is optional.

Real is a strong word, especially in the controversial world of tiki drinks. I've got my issues with Trader Vic, but I don't think there's any question it was invented inside his establishment. Here's the story, and recipes, on the company website.

In a way I can see where this variation comes from, as long as you don't go for the grenadine, but without a unique flavor like the Martinique rum it ain't gonna work. This sounds like one I had in a Chinese restaurant in Wellesley, Mass. (But it was a Chinese restaurant known for it's good Mai Tais.)

Would you be happier if I said a real cocktail instead of a real mai tai? That's more along the lines of what I meant. I guess I define a real cocktail as something that is balanced and not full of fruit juices. Vic himself suggested mixing dark and light rums to mimic the taste of the rum he ran out of for the original mai tais, didn't he? I'm not in the habit of drinking cocktails at the Chinese restaurants I frequent, so I make no claims of it's similiarity. I will say that I think using a nice innocent 17 year old rum along with Dekuyper orange curacao doesn't exactly lend a person the high moral ground when it comes to mixing! Of course, mai tais aren't exactly my favorite cocktails, so what do I know? I've had two in the last 11 years. One at Trader Vic's in SF (my first legal alcoholic beverage) and one more recently. I'll take a Daiquiri any day.

regards,

trillium

Maybe you should have a nice cocktail the next time you go to a Chinese restaurant and contemplate all the logical flaws of what you just said.

Either that, or someone could suggest a drink that is one of their favorites.


Queen of Grilled Cheese

NJ, USA

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I just realized -- you grew up on Mai Tais? Tequila shots got boring after the 3rd grade?

My older cousin was a very frequent guest of a particular Chinese restaraunt, and just about had free run of the place. I was drinking Tiki Bowls there at age 14, and just about anything with an umbrella shortly after. By the time I was 16 I had a Mai Tai at my table before I sat down. When I finally hit legal drinking age my brother and I would usually drink 8 Mai Tais in a single sitting.

Somehow I managed to escape the draw of serious drinking.

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I think Caipirinhas use a lot more lime juice -- ti punch usually just calls for a squeeze of lime

I think the key with Caiprinhas is the halved limes being mashed inside the glass so that some of the bitter oil comes from the skin. Its that bitterness that makes a Caiprinha, not just the lime juice.

I don't think white rum is a good substitute for cachaca. Its too sweet and smooth, where what is exciting about cachaca is the raw, wild edge in the spirit. A cachaca made with white rum just tastes too sweet and syrupy to me. I'd rather go with vodka for a tamer drink which I've seen called a caipiroshka, but is also, I think, the same as a lemon drop.

Wish it was easier to get cachaca though. India is far from Brazil, and while most of my friends coming from abroad have been trained in want to bring, even they don't seem to find it easy finding cachaca in London or NY. I have to end up making do with vodka, even though India has tons of sugar cane so should theoretically not find it hard to have cachaca.

I have asked friends in the liquor industry about this, but got no good answer. Currently I am trying to get a Brazilian friend here to start doing some homebrewing, so lets see...

Vikram

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For simplicity it's hard to beat Ginger Ale and rum with a slice of lime over ice. I drink a lot of rums that aren't really sipping quality this way. But there are differences in ginger ales so check around and find one that isn't too sweet.

Ginger Ale makes a good mixer for white or dark rums.


Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Maybe you should have a nice cocktail the next time you go to a Chinese restaurant and contemplate all the logical flaws of what you just said.

Either that, or someone could suggest a drink that is one of their favorites.

I go to a Chinese restaurant for Chinese food, and the ones I go to don't serve cocktails. If I want a proper cocktail that I'm not making myself, I go to a bar. If you have something to say, please say it directly, but don't belittle the discussion with personal insults and condescension. That's boring and well, fruitless.

If you refer to my original post, you'll see that I mentioned several drinks to make with the rum he didn't feel like drinking neat. The mai tai was mentioned last because of a comment the original poster made about them. Let me try one more time....and then I'm done. The usual thing that passes for a mai tai is full of canned fruit juices like pineapple, orange and guava. They even sometimes add Kahlua and other liqueurs to make the drink even sweeter and muddy tasting. My suggestion was intended to relay the idea that the original poster might appreciate a drink that I'll go ahead and be daring and call a mai tai if it were made more like cocktail with a balance of fresh citrus juice to counteract the sweetness and less like a punch TGIF type of drink full of fruit juices. Or he may not, but options are always a good thing, even if some of them are not something that I care to partake of on a weekly basis.

regards,

trillium

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I think Caipirinhas use a lot more lime juice -- ti punch usually just calls for a squeeze of lime

I think the key with Caiprinhas is the halved limes being mashed inside the glass so that some of the bitter oil comes from the skin. Its that bitterness that makes a Caiprinha, not just the lime juice.

I don't think white rum is a good substitute for cachaca. Its too sweet and smooth, where what is exciting about cachaca is the raw, wild edge in the spirit. A cachaca made with white rum just tastes too sweet and syrupy to me. I'd rather go with vodka for a tamer drink which I've seen called a caipiroshka, but is also, I think, the same as a lemon drop.

Wish it was easier to get cachaca though. India is far from Brazil, and while most of my friends coming from abroad have been trained in want to bring, even they don't seem to find it easy finding cachaca in London or NY. I have to end up making do with vodka, even though India has tons of sugar cane so should theoretically not find it hard to have cachaca.

I have asked friends in the liquor industry about this, but got no good answer. Currently I am trying to get a Brazilian friend here to start doing some homebrewing, so lets see...

Vikram

Isn't there some moonshine type stuff made from sugarcane that's really cheap in India? How close is it to cachaca? I'd swear hearing about underage drinking shennagins involving this booze from a friend who grew up in Bombay.

regards,

trillium

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