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bungalow_bill

Bacon Candy?

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I've seen a few posts about this but no one has actually spelled out how to make it. You bake(?) bacon on both sides and press brown sugar, flour, and walnuts on one side and bake(?) until bubbly?

How much brown sugar to use? How much flour? How much walnuts? What heat do you bake the bacon at? Do you even bake it or do you fry it?

Please help! It sounds soooo good but I don't know where to start!

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No real recipe needed for this Southern treat. Just roll uncooked bacon strips in dark brown sugar on both sides until well-coated with as much sugar as will adhere. Place on foil-lined baking sheet and bake until crisp, maybe flipping once. See what works for you.

I believe Jill Conner Brown's _Sweet Potato Queen's Big-Ass Cookbook and Financial Planner_ contains a good recipe for this.

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This recipe (scroll down a bit) includes the flour and nuts. Also instant coffee. I guess that's not so strange if you pretend it's a red eye thing.

click me!

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Wait -- didn't Heyjude post a recipe for this a year or so ago?

AHA! Found it! on the PacNW Cocktail Party thread:

heyjude Posted: Nov 3 2002, 03:02 PM

Group: Member

Posts: 246

Member No.: 1041

Joined: 26-January 02

The Bacon Candy is a combination of recipes from several sources. They range from dredging the bacon in brown sugar on both sides and baking until crisp(with time ranges of 3 minutes to 35 minutes) to cooking the bacon first on one side and then pressing the brown sugar mixed with chopped walnuts and a teaspoon of flour on the uncooked side and cooking until bubbling and caramelized. I did a version of the latter, but(at least in this oven)will cook the bacon crisp, turning once, before topping with the brown sugar/nut mix in the future. And this recipe does have a future.

--------------------

Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

jramster@drizzle.com

It is also discussed on another thread: Potluck Appetizers, which contains several links back to the cocktail party thread.


Edited by Suzanne F (log)

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Klink gets almost as excited when talking about bacon candy as he does when talking about smoking. (nod)

I can't decide if it sounds detestable or delectable. Isn't it awfully easy to burn?

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Hmmm. Would this work for a potluck? Could you prepare it the night before and bring it to work or would I have to go home and prepare it to bring it in?

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Hmmm.  Would this work for a potluck?  Could you prepare it the night before and bring it to work or would I have to go home and prepare it to bring it in?

I don't think you could do it the night before, because you would have to store it in the fridge and it would probably get soggy. Soggy bacon = baaaad.

I've had heyjude's bacon candy and it's very hard to stop eating - love it! Martha also has a similar recipe in her hors d'oeuvres book.

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Also called Praline Bacon. IMO, it tastes best warm from the oven, so it probably wouldn't do for a potluck.

Use a large, rimmed baking sheet, such as a jelly-roll pan, that is shallow enough to promote browning, yet tall enough (at least 3/4-inch in height) to contain the rendered bacon fat. Heat oven to 400 degrees.

12 slices bacon, thin- or thick-cut, rubbed with

1 tsp brown sugar

dash cayenne pepper

dash dry mustard

chopped pecans, optional

Roast until fat begins to render, 5 to 6 minutes; rotate pan front-to-back. Continue roasting until is crisp and brown, 5 to 6 minutes longer for thin-sliced bacon, 8 to 10 minutes for thick-cut.

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Sounds like a good garnish, crumbled, for baked beans. Esp the version with the cayenne and dry mustard.

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If I can make this, anyone can. It's pretty easy.

I use the recipe from Jill Conner Browne's latest book (a combination cookbook and psychotic diary) called "The Sweet Potato Queens' Big Ass Cookbook and Financial Planner." I believe she calls it "Bitch Bacon" or "Pig Candy" (or I think I've seen her write it both ways in her previous books).

Essentially, it's slices of bacon rolled in dark brown sugar, then baked at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or so, turning once, and cooking until crisp. Here's what I consider the important part: lay the bacon on a cooling rack and then place the rack on a foil lined baking sheet. Otherwise, you'll have bacon swimming in fat and sugar. I roll the raw bacon in a LOT of brown sugar. I make this as an offering to my Sweet Potato Chapter Queen. We eat it at all our offical gatherings.

P.S. I am a member of the Seattle Emerald Sweet Potato Queens. To discover more about this fabulous group and other SPQ chapters go here: Sweet Potato Queens rule


A palate, like a mind, works better with exposure and education and is a product of its environment.

-- Frank Bruni

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Recently made Bacon Candy with bacon from Lenny's meat market in New Ulm, MN. Also made some with "thin" bacon ends from Hackenmueller's meat market in Robbinsdale, MN.

Both were delish.

I love bacon. In all forms. My BBB sandwich (Bacon, more bacon sandwiched between bacon). Bacon Candy. Lardon's has a garnish for almost anything. THis is the most perfect food, IMHO.


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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Did anyone ever determine if bacon candy would hold up for a potluck if made the night before.

Some folks above didn't think it would work...but does anyone know if that's an absolute?

I have a potluck to prepare a dish for...


"Well," said Pooh, "what I like best --" and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called. - A.A. Milne

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