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What did you eat on your wedding night?


tommy
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All right, barring finding the menu at home tonight, I'm going to cop to not remembering what was served (and if you think I'm going to ask my wife, you're nuts). But it was delicious and my wife and I did eat all of it. Which is amazing considering the rehersal dinner/food orgy we had at Il Cortile the night before (thanks Mom).

Our wedding was catered by Anne-Marie Huste at her townhouse on East 30th St. (We had both the ceremony and the reception there). She likes to come out before every course (I think there were 7 of them) and explain what you're about to eat, which I'm sure you'd all find very interesting. Everyone there said it was the best tasting wedding dinner they'd had. When we got back to the Waldorf there was a enormous fruit basket sent by one of my friends. We didn't have room for a plum.

On a side note the last time we were at Anne-Marie's I was seated at dinner next to Sylvia Weinstock. It was great fun to listen to her stories of what incredible assholes her celebrity clients are. I thought it best not to tell her our wedding cake came from Cup Cake Cafe.

Edited by abbeynormal (log)
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We had a morning wedding with a jazz brunch afterwards. We were so busy socialising at our reception that the waitstaff took our plates before we had even taken a bite. We stayed at the Morrison Clark Historic Inn for the night and had a fabulous dinner - this was back when Susan McC. Lindeborg was still the chef.

The day after we had a big cookout at our house with all of our friends, and ate the wedding cake for dessert. It looked too good to freeze. :biggrin:

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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Whatever we served at our reeption was also consumed, in leftover fashion, back at my folks' place during the after party.

The first honeymoon night was our first (massively jetlagged) night in Oahu and we ate at a Benihana. But, the star food of the evening was watching my wife's eyes light up as she tasted her very first Hawaiian pineapple (you west coasters are lucky bastards, on the east coast all we get is costa rican blechy pineapples). We woke up at 3AM and killed a whole bottle of champagne between us. Heh heh :cool:

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I don't recall eating anything at my wedding, although I was told the food was quite good.

The morning after we had jewish soul food - bagels, cream cheese, lox and fresh squeezed orange juice.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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We didn't actually have a wedding, got married at city hall, but we had a huge reception at the Tokyo American Club (think snobbiest of the snobbiest Country Clubs). We had a buffet complete with prime rib, lobster tails, shrimp cocktail, you name it, it was there. Though we only had 160 guest we ordered a buffet for over 200 since half the guests were my husband's football teammates (high, college, and Japanese pro) and there was none leftover.

At Japanese weddding the bride and groom aren't allowed to get up and walk around to we had to count on the guests to bring us food, my husband was so nervous he couldn't eat a bite.....

.....so I ate his as well! :biggrin:

We also ate the cake and what a wonderful cake it was (white cake with raspberry cream), during the wedding planning I was the fussiest about the cake since most cakes at Japanese are fake! :shock: They are just used as props for the photos, they don't actually eat the cake. :blink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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We didn't actually have a wedding, got married at city hall, but we had a huge reception at the Tokyo American Club (think snobbiest of the snobbiest Country Clubs).  We had a buffet complete with prime rib, lobster tails, shrimp cocktail, you name it, it was there. Though we only had 160 guest we ordered a buffet for over 200 since half the guests were my husband's football teammates (high, college, and Japanese pro) and there was none leftover.

At Japanese weddding the bride and groom aren't allowed to get up and walk around to we had to count on the guests to bring us food, my husband was so nervous he couldn't eat a bite.....

.....so I ate his as well! :biggrin:

We also ate the cake and what a wonderful cake it was (white cake with raspberry cream), during the wedding planning I was the fussiest about the cake since most cakes at Japanese are fake! :shock:  They are just used as props for the photos, they don't actually eat the cake. :blink:

I saw something about japanese wedding cakes once. Sometimes they go to crazy extremes, there are certain parts that are real cake so you can cut them and many of them include fireworks and other suprises. Some of the ones I saw were giant at over 7 feet tall.

Ben

Gimme what cha got for a pork chop!

-Freakmaster

I have two words for America... Meat Crust.

-Mario

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What a fun thread! Neither one of us ate very much at the reception, which was in the afternoon. We came back to New York and spent the night at the Plaza Hotel, after having had dinner in Chinatown at the late, lamented, Say Eng Look at Chatham Square. I'm sure that one dish would have been fish in seaweed.

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Only served cake and punch at the reception. Went to the big city (Wichita, KS) to the now-defunct Mr. Steak, and had probably the worst steak and lobster - I was only 17 and had never eaten lobster before. Amazingly, we are still married, and have made up for the bad meal several times over. My cooking skills have improved as much as out palates - Hubby weighs 80lbs more now (26 years later) than when we said "I do".

Stop Family Violence

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Like many people it seems, we spend a great deal of time and effort on the food choice, but didn't eat much ourselves. I think I had a piece of sushi and a middle-eastern meat thing on a stick. I did have a piece of the wedding cake which was a ten kilo Panpepato, which my Sister-in-law brought back to Australia from Siena.

We spend 18 months collecting wine for the night, the catering staff commented that they had never seen wedding guests drink so much wine, about a bottle and a half of wine each, plus beer and cocktails. At six in the morning I let the dogs out to chase out the last wedding guest.

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Lauren and I were married in 1974, on a Thursday afternoon at the United Nations Chapel in NYC.

We brought the dozen or so guests back to our apartment in Queens for a small post-nuptual meal.

The food was platters of cold cuts provided by (the now late and lamented) Pastrami King.

I remember ordering the platters, explaining what I wanted... pastrami, corned beef, salami, etc.

When we got the platters, I was surprised that there was no salami.

Well, that is, until after the guests left and we were packing up the leftovers. There, hiding under an inverted aluminum foil bowl on each platter (which we thought was just there to give the platter different levels)... was sliced kosher salami.

So, that's what we ate for late dinner.... and if I recall correctly... in the morning, grilled salami and eggs.

Edited by alanz (log)
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What a fun thread to read !

We got married on the spur of the moment at a Justice of the Peace, then went out to dinner at the Trader Vic's overlooking the water in Emeryville. I don't remember what we had, just that the waiter was rude. Whatever it was we ordered (the menu was a la carte), the chef didn't think went together-I think we ordered their onion rings or some such thing. The waiter brought us all these different dinner-sized plates, loudly telling us and everyone nearby that the chef refused to put our meal on one plate because he didn't think what we we'd ordered should be served together. Twenty-four years ago, and I still remember how humiliating that was, and what a damper it put on our special day to be treated like stupid childen who needed to be publicly scolded because they didn't know enough to order well in a fancy restaurant. We never ate there again...

The next day we got a bunch of picnic food from a takeout place in Berkeley and took a hike at Point Reyes. Lesson learned: if you hike a mile downhill, then sit in the sun and drink a bottle of champagne and eat mass quantities of food for a few hours, the uphill walk back to your car is much, much, much longer.

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We did get to eat at our reception - both hors d'oeuvres before and dinner. This was planned - chances of my turning into raging Bridezilla would have gone up exponentially had I not been fed.

Before was little dill cheese puffs, spanakopita, fruit and cheese; dinner was buffet - roast pork loin stuffed with cream cheese, apples and pears, and salmon (I think) as the 2nd entree. Various veggies; I vaguely remember having garlic mash and something carroty.

The main cake was marble pound cake with vanilla buttercream filling and marzipan fondant; groom's cake was the classic red velvet armadillo with gray cream cheese icing. Absolutely the best red velvet cake I've ever had; I've been meaning to hit the lady who baked it up for the recipe and keep forgetting.

My parents described the dinner as "the best four heifers they'd ever spent" - their contribution to the reception was the price of four heifers sold for beef breeding stock. :biggrin:

We spent the night at the local Ritz-Carlton; at the time we made the reservation they were running a promotion that included $100 in food vouchers with the room, so we hit the room-service menu for burgers, clam chowder, and dessert. Everything was very tasty; the only questionable thing was the "Ritz-Carlton signature ketchup." Call me plebeian, but I think they'd be much better off with Heinz; it was nasty. They also gave us a little cake as a wedding gift, which we took home the next day; never got to eat any, but our maid of honor/housesitter said it was good. :laugh:

"Tea and cake or death! Tea and cake or death! Little Red Cookbook! Little Red Cookbook!" --Eddie Izzard
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I married right out of college. We were friends with the caterers who also ran a charming Italian restaurant, Barbarino's. We ate at the restaurant no less than twice a week and each time it was difficult to refrain from licking the plate! So that was what we chose for a menu. They were so wonderful to us and set up beautiful tables graced with gorgeous silver platters, candelabras and even some stunning art deco sculpture. We hosted our reception at the new and trendy Aqualon club in the Flats. Hors'oeuvres were passed around by servers, and the soup and salad were served to each guest. The entrees were buffet style.

Hors d'oeuvres -- we missed most of them but they were smoke salmon this and that with dungeness crab thingies. That was up to our chef to prepare. I blindly trusted anything he came up with and they were a hit. Not even crumbs were left, but they made my salmon fishing, Alaskan grandfather happy. :smile:

Dinner: Italian Wedding Soup, small tossed salad of mixed greens, choice of veal marsala or chicken picatta, zuccini veggie medley and a choice of accompanying pasta -- fettucine alfredo, marinara or creamy pesto. (It was the 80's and pesto was still big). No left overs again!

They also did our stunning cake. We discussed two types and I really wanted the white cake with chocolate chips, raspberry filling and white chocolate icing. I got something else entirely different and quite surprising. The disappointment was cast aside once I tasted the lushious chocolate ganache.

The only disappointing events of the night was when we arrived I approached the bar and requested a glass of champagne and the bartender snapped at me that it wasn't to be served yet. I smilled and asked if he was blind to billowing white sequinned gown I was wearing.... I got my glass of champagne! The other, well the photographer was curt and down right rude to my elderly grandparents causing them discomfort and proceeded to seat himself among my guests and join in with the dinner. This point was clearly discussed prior to the evening that he would not be indulging in same. :rolleyes:

It was a fun party. That was what we wanted. All of our guests were dressed beautifully, dancing, enjoying the food, wine and current art on the club's walls while it silently snowed outside. I cannot remember our wine selections but I remember waking up at The Baricelli Inn with a throbbing headache while getting ready to catch our flight to Cancun!

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We were married Sunday morning in a rabbi's study, then went home with our three guests for ..... prosciutto.

I love that combination.

We rented out a Thai restaurant for a buffet and even invited the rabbis assuming they wouldn't show. They did, with their families. I'm not sure, but I might have seen them munching on the pork satay. I'll admit, it was delicious.

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I had a great time at my wedding. We got married last August on a Saturday night at Tribeca Rooftop in Manhattan. From the moment we got engaged, we joked about how no matter where we got married, and no matter how formal the wedding was, we would have pigs in a blanket at the cocktail hour. A personal favorite of ours.

So we spent tons of time planning the menu, mostly paying attention to the hors d'oeuvres (175 hungry Jews need lots of hors d'oeuvres!). But at the wedding neither my husband nor I ever even saw the pigs in a blanket. I know that they were there because I saw my father collecting them for my 5 year old niece (and himself)!

The only food I tasted was immediately after the ceremony. We went to the bridal room to take a few minutes to ourselves, and the caterer had sent us in a platter of sushi. It was terrific. We inhaled it, and then once we went back into the reception, I never had another bite of food.

People were lined up throughout the cocktail hour at the caviar bar. From what I heard at the brunch the next day, the caviar and smoked salmon were amazing, as were the baby lamb chops.

A friend of mine is considering getting married at Tribeca Rooftop next year, and I hope she does so that we can be guests and eat the food!

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john and i got married twice - once on long island with my family, once in the hudson valley with his(his mom announced she wouldn't be at our wedding on long island because it was too far to travel).

on the island my maid of honor, mom and i catered the whole affair with salad, clam quiche, cold cuts. pate, homemade breads. then we went out to a local fish restaurant and had fish and chips. later we picked up a girlfriend and her fiance and went to a local tavern where husband, who was pretty snookered, told the wait staff to feed the french fries he didn't eat to the"rats in the alley" and promptly nodded off sitting on a juke box going full blast :hmmm:

in the hudson valley we were married at the cottonwood inn in millbrook the site of all kinds of reed get togethers from years past. a hot and cold buffet then we went back up to hudson where i lived and went for chinese.

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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We stayed up all night and and around 4 am, just before the car came to take us to the airport, we had chilaquiles with fried eggs...

We had chilaquiles too!

After eating very little at our wedding (truly a shame, as the food was lovely) we spent our first night as newlyweds at the Beekman Hotel.

First peach Bellinis at the Top of the Tower, as we watched the lights of Manhattan (and my engagement ring) twinkle and listened to the jazz piano. But we the kitchen had closed, and we were STARVING, so we ordered room service -- chilequiles and thin-crust pizza, and we polished off a bottle of champagne.

Pizza, champagne, and starry-eyed dreams of romance. A fine way to start a marriage, I'd recommend it to anyone! :wub:

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My wedding party consisted of 6 people total. We all got into a limo, rode up to Washington Heights for a ceremony in my old rabbi's study, then back to the west side for dinner at Cafe des Artistes. We ordered off the menu, but I don't remember what we ate. I do remember that they had a Dom Perignon Champagne that is still the best I have ever had. I think we went back for anniversary #3 or 4. All anniversaries include me making a homemade card and a fine dinner out.

There was a party at our apartment a week or so later. Most of that food came from Zabars. The cake came from Dumas (yum :wub: ). I remember one of the cats stealing chicken from the table and eating it while sitting on the guests' coats. :biggrin:

--mh

--mark

Everybody has Problems, but Chemists have Solutions.

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The wedding was at the City Clerk's office in the Municipal Building (NYC). On our way out, someone from the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council (?) accosted us and asked if we had just gotten married, and would we like to have our picture taken? Sure, why not. So we climbed the stairs to the top of a (10-foot high?) plywood wedding cake in City Hall Park, they got their photo for "The Wedding Project" and we got a Polaroid -- the only commemoration of the event. Then we went home to pack, because we were leaving that afternoon for a conference on Livable Cities in Venice. Italy. Sigh.

So: another vote for airline food. Can't remember which airline, though.

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