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extra lobel's steak


tommy
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so i'm ordering 4 steaks from lobels. and i suggest you all do the same here.

the thing is, i've only got 2 friends. that leaves me with an extra steak. i'd rather not freeze the thing and sit on 1 steak for any amount of time. any ideas on what i can do with 1 10 oz strip steak? tartare or something maybe? some sort of app? maybe i should just eat 2 for dinner?

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Grill it up rare, save it until the next day, thinly slice it and serve with shoyu/wasabi/lime dipping sauce, with a baguette and cold butter and a tomato and onion salad with coriander.

Or just FedEx it to me.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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The steaks come individually Cry-O-Vac wrapped. They're fine in the fridge for a week. Just wait a few days and then cook and eat the other one. Steak of that quality is best eaten as steak.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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The steaks come individually Cry-O-Vac wrapped. They're fine in the fridge for a week. Just wait a few days and then cook and eat the other one. Steak of that quality is best eaten as steak.

i should have bought more and made 2 full meals of it.

i'm hoping to eat it as "steak". in fact, i'm hoping someone will tell me to slice it thin or chop it up and eat it raw. that's what i'm waiting for alright.

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I would not chop it up and eat it raw. NY Strip is really the wrong cut for steak tartare.

Sliced very thin and served raw, though, there are a few preparations that would be nice: Carpaccio with olive oil, lemon juice, a few capers and maybe some slivers of raw onion, salt, pepper. Or there are all sorts of Korean, Vietnamese, Cambodian, etc., raw beef preparations that work well with thin slices of raw beef.

Still, I bet you'll be happier if you just broil or grill it and eat it as steak. If you're cooking for two, since it's not a big enough steak to split, why not do surf-and-turf? Get a couple of lobsters and cook those up, then serve them with a few slices each of the steak. Add corn and whatever, and 5 ounces of steak is a fine portion.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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My Lobel's steak will be arriving on Wednesday, and I have an admission and a problem. I have never cooked a really good steak before (Costco rib-eye and tenderloin is as close as I've come) nor a steak as thick as I expect the Lobel's steak to be. I don't have a grill, and my broiler is a crappy electric (the kind where you can maybe get a single wire over the steak).

So how should I prepare it? I was thinking of trying the Ducasse method--cook slowly, starting on the side with the fat. Would this make sense?

Matthew Amster-Burton, aka "mamster"

Author, Hungry Monkey, coming in May

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My Lobel's steak will be arriving on Wednesday, and I have an admission and a problem. I have never cooked a really good steak before (Costco rib-eye and tenderloin is as close as I've come) nor a steak as thick as I expect the Lobel's steak to be.  I don't have a grill, and my broiler is a crappy electric (the kind where you can maybe get a single wire over the steak).

So how should I prepare it?  I was thinking of trying the Ducasse method--cook slowly, starting on the side with the fat.  Would this make sense?

I'd cook it in a cast iron pan, first on the stove then in the oven. Fat Guy has a good description of the process on the other lobel's thread. The basic idea is to build a crust on the steak on the stove then toss it in the oven to finish. That being said I don't think you could go wrong with the Ducasse slow cooked method.

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Here's that other Lobel's thread:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST&f=1&t=24538

Also, even though the link to the Times article, by Ducasse, is dead, the "Ducasse Method of Cooking Steak" thread contains some useful discussion:

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?act=ST&f=2&t=3482

Mamster, I noticed on the other thread that you say you ordered a 12-ounce boneless strip. I think your steak may not be large enough for the Ducasse method to be the preferred method. You really need to get into the steak-for-two realm (steaks more in the 24- to 32-ounce range, cut very thick and with a good exterior fat and possibly bone-in, almost more like roasts than steaks) for the Ducasse method to be the way to go. I think what you'll find with the Ducasse method applied to a smaller steak is that it won't develop as well -- it will either cook through or be too "wet." So I'd use one of the methods described on the other thread: heavy-skillet/sear-then-roast, top-broil, or grill. Rare.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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so i'm ordering 4 steaks from lobels.  and i suggest you all do the same here.

the thing is, i've only got 2 friends.  that leaves me with an extra steak.  i'd rather not freeze the thing and sit on 1 steak for any amount of time.  any ideas on what i can do with 1 10 oz strip steak?  tartare or something maybe?  some sort of app?  maybe i should just eat 2 for dinner?

without an extra thought i would just eat 2.

is this the ultra good ultra expensive wagyu meat

i have not yet had the pleasure myself

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I'd cook it in a cast iron pan, first on the stove then in the oven. Fat Guy has a good description of the process on the other lobel's thread. The basic idea is to build a crust on the steak on the stove then toss it in the oven to finish.

Similar to (actually pretty much the same as) the FG method in the other Lobel thread is this one from Good Eats. To follow Alton all the way through this process, check out the show transcript here Good Eats: Steak Your Claim

It seems deceptively simple. I'd like to know if it works before I try it. rryumy.gif

Edited by abbeynormal (log)
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Alton's method works spectacularly well. As a matter o' fact, I prefer my KC Strips cooked this way -- even over grilling. Don't be shy with the salt, either. Forget anything you might have heard about salt drawing out the juices from a steak. That's what you want! In a fast, dry heat cooking method like this, the proteins in the meat juices carmelize (Maillard reaction) to form the oh-so-lovely crust that is the pinnacle of steaky perfection.

However have your vent hood on high, all your doors and windows open and your smoke detectors turned off. There's a reason my kids call this "smokey steak." It tastes wonderful, but if you're not prepared it can fill your house with smoke in very short order.

You have been warned :raz: .

Chad

Chad Ward

An Edge in the Kitchen

William Morrow Cookbooks

www.chadwrites.com

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Oh, are you ever in for a treat !!! Lobel's steaks are way beyond comparison.

Just do the simplest salt/ pepper combination prior to searing on the highest heat (grill or grill-pan) but add some sugar to what you sprinkle on the steak. It is not so much for flavor but it assures a really fine crust.

Slice that extra one up the next day (or cook it then) and put it over simply dressed greens (and open a pinot).

Bob Sherwood

Bob Sherwood

____________

“When the wolf is at the door, one should invite him in and have him for dinner.”

- M.F.K. Fisher

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As luck would have it, this Saturday will be my birthday. This particular one has been diminished by too many previous ones, but I am sure nobody can relate to that!

Thanks to Tommy and Melkor, this one will be celebrated, I hope, with steaks from Lobels (12 0z boneless Strips), a home grown Ceazar Salad (with the croutons still warm) and some iced Korbel.

What a country!!!!

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ended up making a thai beef salad with the extra steak. this time, i seasoned it a bit more, and coated with olive oil before grilling. it was simply fantastic, and a notch above the last batch. the salad was mesclun, mint, cilantro, shallot, red onion, red pepper, thai chilis, dressed with a fish sauce/lime juice/sugar.

served with a Llano blush (from texas). a nice summer quaffing wine, with just enough sweetness, balanced with a bit of acidity to make it make sense. a fun fruity little wine. from what i'm seeing in a brief search on the internet, this wine retails for about 6 bucks a bottle. i'd buy a case if i could.

thanks lobel's!

Edited by tommy (log)
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Has anyone out there while grilling or pan frying their steaks do as this Washington Post article suggests, "Coat filets evenly with sugar, salt and black pepper,". The article goes on and says that, "there was nothing sugary about the steak: no saccharin smack or caramel overtone. But that steak was different -- and it was one of the best steaks I'd ever tasted."

What are people's experiences with this application; love to hear them?

Hobbes

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Has anyone out there while grilling or pan frying their steaks do as this Washington Post article suggests, "Coat filets evenly with sugar, salt and black pepper,".  The article goes on and says that, "there was nothing sugary about the steak: no saccharin smack or caramel overtone. But that steak was different -- and it was one of the best steaks I'd ever tasted."

What are people's experiences with this application; love to hear them?

Hobbes

One of my favorite ways to grill lesser quality steaks is to mash a garlic clove, some salt, some pepper, some sugar together in a mortar and pestle, then mix it with a few tablespoons of butter then rub it onto the steaks and grill. The sugar seems to improve the crust on the steaks.

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Has anyone out there while grilling or pan frying their steaks do as this Washington Post article suggests, "Coat filets evenly with sugar, salt and black pepper,".  The article goes on and says that, "there was nothing sugary about the steak: no saccharin smack or caramel overtone. But that steak was different -- and it was one of the best steaks I'd ever tasted."

What are people's experiences with this application; love to hear them?

Hobbes

See this old thread.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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This thread and the older one reminds me of something that my dad tried years ago. He was always up for trying anything slightly weird and intriguing.

First he had the butcher cut him this really thick sirloin, like 2 1/2 or three inches thick. Then you coated it with s&p, LIBERALLY. Now the fun part... you start packing on sugar, extracting some juices as you go until you have a sugar crust about 1/2 inch thick. Hum that puppy into the oven as hot as you can get it. I forget the timing but you end up with this almost carbonized crust that you knock off and a fabulous rare to medium rare piece of meat.

For obvious reasons, we would do this at the country house. It didn't have smoke detectors and we could open all of the windows for the breezes to sweep the smoke out. Then he got smarter and just revved up the 55 gallon drum grill/smoker to do this outside. I am sure that my mother's opinion of this operation had nothing to do with his move outside. :biggrin:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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