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SobaAddict70

Favorite condiment

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Oh, and I'm not adverse to the Sweet n Sour Sauce they give away at the Arches. :smile:

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Tabasco indeed makes a chipotle hot sauce, it's my current favorite in their lineup. They also make a garlic hot sauce and a habanero hot sauce, along with their usual green or red varieties. But the chipotle is great, has a rich complex flavor, and has more of a steak sauce-like consistency than most vinegar-based hot sauces. It also isn't insanely hot, just the right amount of heat.

If you can buy it at the store, I think you can order it thru their website.

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I absolutely LOVE the "peppers booze" (for wont of a better term) that you get in the islands of the Caribbean.

For those of you not familiar with them, the islanders take chile peppers of some kind and steep them in booze. Then they remove the peppers and you have this delicious alcoholic condiment.

Currently on my shelf I have Sherry Peppers from Bermuda, and Rum Peppers from the Virgin Islands.

I used to have a close friend who was raised in Bermuda. When we'd go to her house for dinner, she'd usually have the Sherry Peppers on the table. Once, she served a baked bean dish and on the table were small bottles of black rum, and Outerbridges Sherry Peppers. You poured the rum and/or Sherry Peppers on your beans, to taste. My friend said that in Bermuda, you NEVER were offered baked beans or black beans, etc., of any kind without also being offered Sherry Peppers and black rum. She said it'd be like someone serving you french fries without catsup in the States. Just didn't happen.

I'm telling y'all, once you get used to these delicious condiments, it's impossible to remove their flavor from your memory.

At least it has been for me.

On the Sherry Peppers label it says: "Contains sherry, peppers & spices. This traditional Bermuda condiment adds zest to scrambled eggs, bouillabaisse, grilled cheese, curries, frankfurters, grouse, clam chowder, Irish stew, swordfish, scallopini, watercress, Caesar Salads, Martinis and Bloody Marys, to name just a few. Try it and see."

The West Indian Rum Peppers label says: "Contains rum, peppers & spices. From the sunny Caribbee we bring to you native aromatic herbs and spices. They are the perfume of our sun and earth which you will remember and enjoy throughout the years. Our West Indian Rum Peppers are made with the finest local rum, fresh peppers and spices. Adds pizazz to hundres of recipes: stews, soups, marinades, curries, egg and cheese recipes and Bloody Marys. It's HOT!!!"


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I''ve been eating a lot of ajvar lately after having some for the first time at Maggie's house. Ajvar is an Eastern European paste/sauce made of red peppers, garlic, eggplant, onions, and tomatoes. A great thing to do with this is mix it with some mayo and put it on a sandwich.

Buy ajvar here. The bottle they have only cost me $0.99, not $5.99 :huh:

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Okay, aside from the obvious garlic, kosher salt, EVOO, et al -- Blair's Death Sauce. I love it on corn on the cob, especially when the Death Sauce butter drips onto the plate and I can dip my grilled burger onto it.

As an aside, I grilled hamburgers last night and just can't get the kids (or my wife) to buy into the idea of Lottery Burgers. That's where you take a really hot sauce and mix it into one of the patties, arrange them so that even the cook doesn't know which is which and see who starts sweating & hiccuping. Dunno why they won't go for it  :biggrin: .

Chad

Hi-lar-ious!

Lottery burgers! I love it!

BBQ'd corn on the cob rubbed with lime juice and hot ground chilies mixed with equal parts of sugar and salt! YUM!

definitely if stranded on a desert island etc. a bottle of hot sauce - I mean it gives you salt, vinegar, heat and sometimes sweet overtones it is perfecto....however I am also on board with the orange marmalade obsession. recently I had a creamy peanut butter and seville orange marmalade sandwich on fluffy white bread (part of my twice annual-how many things can I produce with this one loaf of super-white!)


Edited by Bernaise (log)

Life! what's life!? Just natures way of keeping meat fresh - Dr. who

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...the chipotle is great, has a rich complex flavor, and has more of a steak sauce-like consistency than most vinegar-based hot sauces.  It also isn't insanely hot, just the right amount of heat.

I love the new Tabasco chipotle, too. While a fan of the original sauce, I think it has more of a "kick" to it than the regular red Tabasco sauce, or perhaps its depth of flavor gives me that impression. I did try their Habenero flavor and while I enjoyed the heat, alas, I am not a fan of the taste of habeneros or scotch bonnets.

I am anxious to try the Chipotle flavor on a pan of Buffalo Wings. Saturday's menu is coming into focus...


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Garlic Tabasco.

Can't find in stores.

Have to order both Chipotle and Garlic off their Web site.

:angry:


I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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here are some current favorites

smoked tomato jam

persimmon hot sauce

24 hour slow roasted lemon puree

brown butter and yuzu holandaise sauce

chive blossom jelly

lovage puree

morel mushroom and foie gras fat vinaigrette

OK, Twodogs, so where do you hang your hat? Interesting list. I'm dying to know where I could buy these (well, not so much the lovage puree and the morel mushroom and foie gras fat vinaigrette....) or are you pulling legs here? I like tomato jam, for example, but have never seen *roasted* tomato jam.... (BTW, I'm in NYC; and I can't say what my favorite condiment is; I'm just making my way through the jars and bottles of strange, unlabeled things in my fridge. I do rather like a tamarind chutney...and "pickled figs" made with red wine vinegar and cloves and I can't remember what else....

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I love mustard.

Mmmm.... mustard.

I smoked a whole duck this weekend in the smoker and, as a condiment, I served a sauce of 50/50 pure maple syrup and "Moutarde en Grains de Beaume" (Course Dijon Mustard) from Williams and Sonoma.

It is great when served chilled. The flavor of the duck, the sweetness of the syrup, and acidity of the mustard all match nicely and elevated each other. When the condiment warmed up, the balance diminished. Definitely serve this condiment chilled.

Edit: fixing the pronoun and removing the dangler...


Edited by Really Nice! (log)

Drink!

I refuse to spend my life worrying about what I eat. There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. --John Mortimera

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Has anybody mentioned pork chops yet?

How about Mama Lil's? Goat horn peppers pickled in vinegar, then packed in olive and canola oils. Great peppers, then you realize you've got to do something with all of that delicious oil...

I made a big batch of aioli for some friends and they won't shut up about it. Just the standard deal, but they have always bought (fat free) mayonnaise at the store. I borrowed some back, and I don't think I could live without it now.

Hot sauces: Scorned Woman, Cajun Bottle Rocket, African Rhino Piri-Piri Sauce (expensive, but incredible) All of 'em are good on fried eggs.

And lovage puree.


If we aren't supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?

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One Indian condiment that's not as widely known as it should be is Surati Jiralu, a spice mixture from Gujarat on the west coast. It combines salt, cumin, black salt, chilli, turmeric, dry ginger and asafoetida, all in powder form. Its a bright yellow powder and despite the chilli, not hot at all, but with a wonderful salty-savoury taste. One can eat it sprinkled on tomatoes or other raw veggies, on bread or khakras (crisp flatbread), but it is the best, repeat, THE BEST, thing to eat sprinkled on plain fresh yoghurt,

Vikram

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I like worchestershire sauce. That and horseradish is great with a nice rare steak. My favorite is in tomato juice or V8.

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I like worchestershire sauce.  That and horseradish is great with a nice rare steak. My favorite is in tomato juice or V8.

Yum!

Mix the worchestershire, horseradish and V8 with some vodka, Tabasco, celery salt and a twist of lemon and you have my brother's version of a Bloody Mary.

To quote from "I Love Lucy"- "It's so tasty, too!" :biggrin:


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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attn: aquataine

previous list of condiments are all made in house and i forgot to mention black truffle mayonnaise made with soft boiled eggs (in fact the list of flavored mayonaise made with soft boiled eggs is limitless; from yuzu to smoked salmon) also you can gratinee this mayonnaise with little fear of it breaking

store bought condiments

crystal hot sauce

chipolte tabasco

tamari soy sauce

white soy sauce

duke's mayonaisse

any matouks hot sauce (four exist)

lime pickle

creme fraiche

ketchup (with the addition of a syrup made of equal parts balsamic vinegar, red wine vinegar, soy sauce)


h. alexander talbot

chef and author

Levittown, PA

ideasinfood

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I don't know.  I'm really changeable in this.  Butter?  Mayonaise?  Gravy?  Hot sauce?  Salt?  Pepper?  Shall I stop? It all depends on what I'm eating, and that thing is my favorite.  I pack away a LOT of ketchup with a burger and fries.

Forget the ketchup and pick up some Heinz Chili Sauce. Don't let the name fool you, this isn't a hot sauce. Rather it is a refined ketchup. Since tasting it the first time I've avoided ketchup whenever possible, preferring this better version of what ketchup is trying to be.


J. Franklin Campbell

http://JFCampbell.US

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Sriracha, Harissa in the tube, truffle honey from Tuscany, chipoltes in adobo that I've whirled around in the blender and put in a squeeze bottle, Maldon sea salt, and Kosckiusko (sp.) mustard......


Edited by ZenFoodist (log)

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Creole mustard, lemon juice, Tabasco or similar style hot sauce

Oh, dear, I'm about to tell on myself.... and Thousand Island dressing (ducks and skitters away)


Screw it. It's a Butterball.

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Two items that i like with most foods.

#1 Takwang - that sliced yellow pickled radish you get at Japanese and Korean restaurants

#2 Spanish mazanella olives - those teeny green salty olives with the pimiento


Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

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How about Mama Lil's?  Goat horn peppers pickled in vinegar, then packed in olive and canola oils.  Great peppers, then you realize you've got to do something with all of that delicious oil...

...

Hot sauces:  Scorned Woman, Cajun Bottle Rocket, African Rhino Piri-Piri Sauce (expensive, but incredible)  All of 'em are good on fried eggs.

You must hang out at Matt's.

I know you are in the right town.

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smoked tomato jam

persimmon hot sauce

24 hour slow roasted lemon puree

lovage puree

More info please.

I slow roast tomatoes until they are not quite dry and puree them - is this similar to the jam or is it more like real jam?

Anything persimmon, yes please.

Lemons - like tomatoes? Any spice, other additions?

Lovage - okay, the plant is back up - already 3 feet tall - what do I do with it?

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Here are my current favorite condiments:

From left to right:

Pearl River Bridge Mushroom Soy Sauce, Sambal Oelek, DOM sauce, Chee Hou sauce, and Caravan yogurt. The Sambal Oelek is a chili paste. The Chee Hou sauce is like the sauce for mu shu dishes, but a bit thicker. Same flavor to me.

i5094.jpg

Anyone know what to call this? My Chinese friends say it translates as "Dried Old Mother Sauce". Doesn't sound very appetizing, but it is firey, savory and just plain good. I think they are referring to the brand, not the contents, with that name.........

Here is a close up of the bottle for anyone kind enough to translate for me.

i5095.jpg

And a close up of the contents, which are dried fermented beans, peanuts, chili and oil.

i5097.jpg

Also a favorite is this Gold Coin Red Chillies Stuffed Pickle in Oil from Parchanga Foods. Its to die for.

i5098.jpg

The Caravan yogurt is really, really thick, with almost a yogurt cheese-like consistancy. It helps cut the heat if I get too carried away by the others....

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Hmmm...

Tabasco... Chipotle, Garlic, Green, Habernero

Pikkapepper (sp?)

Sriracha

Mojo de ajo

Preserved lemon

Jalapenos en escabeche

And... check out this thread on preserved citrus. My favorite marmalade is from that mystery orange tree (ultimately found to be a calamondin) lovingly made by my sister.


Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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here are some current favorites

smoked tomato jam

persimmon hot sauce

24 hour slow roasted lemon puree

I must know more about 24-hour, slow-roasted lemon puree. Can you share the recipe/technique, and some applications for it? Also, do you make the tomato jam and persimmon hot sauce? We have an abundance of wild persimmons, and we grow hot peppers...

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