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Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk

8 T butter

2 cups AP flour

1 T sugar

1 t salt

1 1/2 t yeast

2 eggs

1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).

With the overnight refrigeration, doesn't significant gluten formation take place? You have water and flour sitting together for a long time.

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I did not find the gluten increase problematic: the waffles were very tender. I don't really have a good explanation for that, but yeasted waffles have been around for a long time, and with good reason. I was especially concerned at first when the recipe called for whisking everything together quite vigorously, but it just didn't seem to be an issue.

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Tonight for dinner I made the "Waffles of Insane Greatness" linked to above. I used the whole milk option since I don't have any buttermilk at the moment. The WIG recipe has two major departure points from my normal waffles. First, it has a very large amount of cornstarch in it (the flour to cornstarch ratio is 3:1). Second, it uses vegetable oil rather than butter. Here is the waffle that came out:

Waffle of Insane Greatness Whole.jpg

And the interior:

Waffle of Insane Greatness Interior.jpg

I had some trouble getting these waffles to fill out the iron: the batter is very thin, and they didn't want to rise all the way up to the top. I suspect this recipe is better with a non-Belgian iron. Second, the texture of the waffles was quite good, certainly the crispiest I've ever had in a non-yeasted waffle, but I think this came at the expense of flavor: corn starch may be great for crispiness, but it it essentially tasteless. Last, to be honest, I missed the butter. The WIG were fine, for a non-yeasted waffle, and a good option when you want your waffles NOW. But I think several of the recipes up-topic are competitive with these, in particular those that use butter rather than vegetable oil.

Next up: Marion Cunningham's Yeasted Waffles.

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Today for lunch I tried to make Cunningham's yeasted waffles, but I must have screwed up the recipe last night, because the batter was much too thin: the waffle I tried to make with the batter as-is did not have enough structure to rise, it simple flowed out the sides of the iron. To salvage the situation I added another half cup or so of flour and beat it in well (my current working theory of waffles is that you actually want gluten formation so that they hold together). These are the waffles that resulted:

Cunningham Waffle Whole.jpg

Cunningham Waffle Interior.jpg

Still a very good waffle, but I have to withhold comparison to the others until I get the actual recipe to turn out correctly.

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Chris-what type of waffle iron do you use? Your waffles are beautiful. I bought a Cuisinart deep waffle iron last year and I love it. I do admit thought that I cheat and don't make my own batter. I've tried making it from scratch using the egg white recipe and while good, it never equals the powdered mix I buy-Carbon's Golden Malted Waffle Mix. It's the old-time diner mix they've been making since 1937. Delicious.

Yesterday I made waffles using a recipe that is a take on the Cargon Malted Waffle Mix. The key to the recipe is to used malted milk powder and to fold an egg white into the batter to make it light and airy. The malted milk powder gives the waffles a tangy flavor. Sometimes I substitute buttermilk for regular milk in the batter and it adds to the sweet yet sour flavors in the waffles.

Waffle Maker.JPG

Crisp on the outside and still fluffy in the center.

Waffle.JPG

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Having been on an inexplicable frozen waffle kick for a few weeks, I decided to breakdown and buy a Belgian Waffle maker. I found this thread and read through it first.

The recipes provided with the machine were very similar to the ones here so I decided start with those. First I tried a yeasted version and opted to just let it rise at room temp instead of leaving in the refigerator overnight (impatience). The results were okay. A little dense maybe. A few days later I tried the whipped egg white version. The results seemed pretty much the same. In fact, I was impressed by how similar they were. I was pretty sure of my technique, except for the heat setting and the amount of batter I was using. I suspect I'm using a bit too much batter and that's not leaving enough room for expansion.

One thing that struck me was that although there ws a lot of butter in the batter, I didn't feel that the results were all that buttery. I thought the same amount of melted butter poured on top of a baked waffle might be better. Having never had a proper Belgian Waffle, I had no preconception about what it was I was after. So I decided to throw convention to the wind and just start playing.

Thinking of similar baked things, the first thing that came to mind was pate a choux. Could I get a crispy exterior and a very light interior? I tried it, adding an extra egg to loosen the paste. I still had to pipe the dough onto the machine.

Perhaps because of the extra egg, I didn't get a crispy result. But it was eggy and buttery in a good way. Actually, it was a crepe in waffle form (a creffle?). I like crepes, so I may explore that path further.

Later I thought "Hey, what about funnel cake batter?" Looking it up, I discovered the potentially useful bit trivia that funnel cake batter pretty much is waffle batter.

Being generally fascinated by yeast leavened things, I then decided to go minimalist. What if I just poured a poolish in the thing? (a poofle?) Well, I had to find out. I took 150g flour (hi gluten), 200g water, 3g salt, and about a gram of yeast, and mixed it in a measuring cup. I let it bubble up and poured it into the hot waffle maker. It became waffle bread.

I'm still trying to decide what I think about it. It's bread - nice and freshly baked - but in a weird form. Visually, it would fool pretty much anyone (okay, maybe a little light in color). As I chew it, I think "Why isn't this a waffle?" Maybe a bit too chewy, not crisp enough on the outside, needs something in the flavor department....

Hmmm, What if I threw some blueberries in there? An egg? I could let the poolish sour. What if I used pastry flour? Cornstarch would likely help with crispiness.

Or, what if I poured brownie batter into the thing...? :raz:

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Hmmm, What if I threw some blueberries in there? An egg? I could let the poolish sour. What if I used pastry flour? Cornstarch would likely help with crispiness.

I followed up my waffle bread experiment with some gut level modifications. Much to my own surprise, I nailed my goals for color and texture - A nicely thin crispy golden brown exterior with a very light, airy, tender, slightly eggy crumb. The flavors could be more complex, but I'll feel very comfortable further developing that aspect. Still, with a pre-planned external application of butter and syrup, these were exactly what I was going for.

For two 7" diameter, 1.5" thick waffles....

75g White Lilly Flour (for lightness...)

75g All Purpose Flour (...but hedging my bet)

10g Cornstarch (for crispyness)

4g Sugar (for browning)

3g Salt

3g Active Dry Yeast

225g Water

1 Large Egg (50g)

Whisk together dry and wet ingredients separately. Then mix together. Let proof for an hour or two until risen about 50% over original level.

This basic recipe could use a bit more salt, but is okay as is. And as waffles go, these should be pretty healthy. I'm almost ashamed of that. But as my original goal was to drizzle butter over the top, I'm okay with it.

Future flavor enhancement plans:

  • A touch more salt
  • Cold ferment in the refrigerator overnight
  • Vanilla
  • Malt
  • Replace some water with cream

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Recently I've been following this blog.

The guy is a waffle historian/cook, and works a lot on his recipes, also he uses some unorthodox techniques, that makes a lot of sense and achieve great results.

Heating the eggs on a hot water bath before using them, and using all wet ingredients above room temperature (43-50 C). wich really makes a difference on waffle making.

He has some great recipes there and a lot of experimental ones.


Edited by felipetruji (log)

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Just read through this thread, after following a link from the "air waffles" thread. My very favorite waffle recipe, which happens to be a yeasted waffle, is this one. I will halve the recipe if it's just two of us (but go ahead and use a whole egg). Had them first at a B&B in the Blue Ridge Mountains in western Maryland, fell in love and begged for the recipe. The host laughed, and pulled a copy out of a stack she had in a file folder. Apparently requests are frequent.

 

I also like to put cornbread batter in the waffle iron, a trick I learned from @Kim Shook. A cornbread waffle with a healthy serving of beans atop it...now that's some good stuff.

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Comments: It has been my experience that waffle recipes differ very little from each other. Yeasted or not, eggs separated or not--those are the distinctions. Fruit and nuts can easily be included in recipes, as can corn meal and oats. My favorite waffle cookbook is of course Dorie Greenspan's. I especially appreciate the way she gives us permission to eat waffles at any time of day.

 

Having said that, I have to relate The Great Waffle Experiment that took place many years ago when my husband was away and nobody was watching. The counters were covered with ingredients--roasted poblanos, sun-dried tomatoes, raisins, blueberries, grated lemon rind, walnuts, pine nuts, cheddar cheese--on and on. It was the cheese that was my undoing.

 

I made a basic batter to work with and started adding ingredients and tasting the outcomes. By the way, this was being done on my parents' old non non-stick, which required extensive oiling to reduce sticking. All went well, though some experiments were more successful than others, if you get what I mean. I cannot recommend sun-dried tomatoes and raisins, no matter how interesting the idea may be.

 

My Waterloo came when I tried to make cheese waffles. The cheese had a death grip on the waffle iron. I thought I'd oiled it enough--I had great hopes for that waffle--but only a jackhammer could remove it. I had another glass of wine and considered my options--I could keep hacking away at it, or I could just ditch the whole thing, throw away the waffle iron. I had a moment's pang about tossing my parents' waffle iron, but then I recalled that they never really made waffles, at least in my memory. I think it was a wedding present.

 

So I threw away the waffle iron, cheese waffle still bonded like glue to the grids of the iron. And the next day I bought a nice Vitantonio with a blissfully-nonstick surface, which I have used to this day.

 

Like all of you, I love waffles. I have no favorite recipe and I work through Dorie Greenspan's book whenever I get the craving. I tend to like waffles that are more substantial but are still crisp on the outside and tender on the inside. Perhaps that's a contradiction? For what it's worth, my favorite waffle has a bit of cornmeal and blueberries. Real maple syrup, of course.

 

We're going to a friend's house for brunch tomorrow, otherwise I'd be making waffles. But it is on my list for next Sunday. That and Bloody Marys.

 

Happy waffling--N.

 

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Great story!  Thanks for sharing. Dorie has a book on waffles? Who knew. Must look it up. 


Edited by Anna N (log)

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15 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

My favorite waffle cookbook is of course Dorie Greenspan's. I especially appreciate the way she gives us permission to eat waffles at any time of day.

 

Oh man....I don't even have a waffle iron and I ordered a copy of the book because I couldn't resist the title:  Waffles: From Morning to Midnightir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=068815804 and the teaser text on Amazon:

Quote

A collection of sixty sensational waffle recipes features instructions for making Dill Waffles with Soft Scallion Cream Cheese, Spicy Ricotta Waffles with Roasted Red Pepper Spoon Bread, and Cumin Waffles with Humus

 

I figure I'll read it and then give it to my cousin who makes waffles regularly.....that, or I'll end up back on Amazon for a waffle iron...xD

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19 hours ago, kayb said:

 

I also like to put cornbread batter in the waffle iron, a trick I learned from @Kim Shook. A cornbread waffle with a healthy serving of beans atop it...now that's some good stuff.


Stuffing in a waffle iron topped with leftover turkey and gravy and some cranberry sauce on the side is pretty tasty too.

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On 2/4/2017 at 7:37 PM, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

My favorite waffle cookbook is of course Dorie Greenspan's. I especially appreciate the way she gives us permission to eat waffles at any time of day.

 

I am back to report that I purchased a copy of Dorie's Waffles: from Morning to Midnightir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=068812609. It's out of print but there are a lot of used copies on Amazon for a penny.  I picked a hardcover and it's the nice spiral-bound type that opens flat on the kitchen counter.

I don't even have a waffle iron and fully expected to read through it for fun and then hand it off to my cousin who makes waffles often.  No dice - the combination of so many interesting recipes, Dorie's recommendations that they freeze beautifully and my possession of the perfect tool for reheating them (my CSO :x, of course) means I am now in the market for a waffle iron.  I will peruse the thrifts for a while before shelling out for a new one.  

What piqued my interest appetite?   Curried waffle club sandwiches with chutney mayo!  Smoked salmon and dill waffles with scallion cream cheese! Scallion waffles flavored with ginger, garlic, chili paste and sesame with sesame chicken salad!  Mashed potato waffles with garlic-rosemary oil!   New England clam-hash waffles!  Polenta waffles with creamy goat cheese sauce!

 

A list of the recipe titles and ingredients is here on EYB.

 

Edited to add:  Thank you, @Nancy in Pátzcuaro!


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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No! No! No!   I will not succumb.

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5 minutes ago, Anna N said:

No! No! No!   I will not succumb.

 

Perhaps I didn't use the correct ammunition, but I clearly hit my target xD!

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4 minutes ago, Anna N said:

No! No! No!   I will not succumb.


While I never feel inclined to bet against anything you say you're going to do (or not do, in this case), I think I know which side of the betting pool my money would have to go on this time. :D

Seeing this thread rise to the top today just helps shine a spotlight on my shame. I had everything ready to go yesterday to make a batch of yeasted waffle batter so it could spend the night doing it's yeast reaction thing. I was looking forward to those waffles for a nice Sunday breakfast. I was going to take a few of my homemade breakfast sausage patties* out of the freezer to go with it. I woke up in the middle of the night with the realization that I went to bed without making the batter. It was somewhere around 2 am and I just wasn't willing to get up and do it then... so next Sunday it is.

*I can't speak for all parts of Canada but it's impossible to get anything even remotely close to southern U.S. style breakfast sausage anywhere near where I live. The bland, squashy, joyless tubes of fat and gristle they call breakfast sausage in the local restaurants and grocery store aren't the slightest bit tempting. I need flavor, a nice touch of heat and plenty o' sage in my breakfast sausage.

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17 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Perhaps I didn't use the correct ammunition, but I clearly hit my target xD!

P.S.  I already have a very adequate waffle iron.

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8 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I am back to report that I purchased a copy of Dorie's Waffles: from Morning to Midnightir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=068812609. It's out of print but there are a lot of used copies on Amazon for a penny.  I picked a hardcover and it's the nice spiral-bound type that opens flat on the kitchen counter.

I don't even have a waffle iron and fully expected to read through it for fun and then hand it off to my cousin who makes waffles often.  No dice - the combination of so many interesting recipes, Dorie's recommendations that they freeze beautifully and my possession of the perfect tool for reheating them (my CSO :x, of course) means I am now in the market for a waffle iron.  I will peruse the thrifts for a while before shelling out for a new one.  

What piqued my interest appetite?   Curried waffle club sandwiches with chutney mayo!  Smoked salmon and dill waffles with scallion cream cheese! Scallion waffles flavored with ginger, garlic, chili paste and sesame with sesame chicken salad!  Mashed potato waffles with garlic-rosemary oil!   New England clam-hash waffles!  Polenta waffles with creamy goat cheese sauce!

 

A list of the recipe titles and ingredients is here on EYB.

 

Edited to add:  Thank you, @Nancy in Pátzcuaro!

 

Unless you want a Belgian waffle iron,  I suggest you look for a Sunbeam waffle iron from the  last century.  They produce a better result than any more recent irons.  The Sunbeam CG1 is, in my opinion, the best consumer waffle iron ever made.  The Toastmaster commercial double automatic iron - made for regular wiring, is even better but extremely expensive.  

 

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I picked up my Belgian waffle iron at Big Lots for, I think, $12.50. Granted, it only makes one at a time, but then, I can only eat one at a time...

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I have three. 

 

One's a Kenmore of 1960s vintage, making four of the old-school thin, rectangular waffles at a time (probably not unlike the Sunbeam Andiesenji endorses). It's not non-stick, of course, but makes very good waffles. I also have a Cuisinart Belgian waffle maker, the rotating variety, which is adequate but no more. My third is the same as the Cuis but dates from when they were sold under the Waring Pro brand name (a 300, rather than a 300c) and is somewhat better built and makes a better, crisper waffle. Unfortunately it's currently in pieces... again. I've reassembled it twice after it was dropped and broken; this time it happened during a move when it fell and then had a heavy box drop on it. It's a little "more broken" than usual, and I've only found time to halfway reconstruct it. Also I'm out of epoxy at the moment. 

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On 2/12/2017 at 0:47 PM, blue_dolphin said:

I am back to report that I purchased a copy of Dorie's Waffles: from Morning to Midnightir?t=egulletcom-20&l=am2&o=1&a=068812609. It's out of print but there are a lot of used copies on Amazon for a penny.  I picked a hardcover and it's the nice spiral-bound type that opens flat on the kitchen counter.

[...]

A list of the recipe titles and ingredients is here on EYB.

 

I have no idea how I was unaware of the existence of this book. I have several of Greenspan's others, and I love waffles, so I ordered myself a copy. After reading it through, I figured I'd try a bunch of the recipes, so started a separate topic for it here. Please come over and post your experiences!

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      + + +

      I’ll need two of Mike’s best crabs for Sunday’s show -- one for the meat in the crab stuffing, and another one for the display of ingredients on the set.

      This morning Mike takes literally 20 minutes to scrub and wash the shell of the prized "display crab." As he toils away, I vow to honor his crab by insuring that the shell will be kept wet and shiny during its appearance -- or I won’t be able to show my face in Mike’s shop again.

      I’ll be making a crab cake mixture to stuff the shrimp. I’m wondering if Mike can top himself after the wondrous crabs he’s already given me, but he doesn’t disappoint today -- his fresh Wild American Shrimp fished out of the Gulf of Florida are just the right size to hold my savory crab cake stuffing.

      In the case of Sunday’s dish of Stuffed Shrimp, the recipe calls for grilling the shrimp on the outdoor barbecue. But we won’t be barbecuing the shrimp on camera this Sunday. I’ll grill the shrimp at home and then we’ll go through the motions of the cooking process during our live segment.

      I try to have all of my prep work done by late Saturday afternoon so I all I have to do on Sunday morning is pack the coolers and drive to the studio. There won’t be a Hummer limousine at my doorstep on Sunday morning waiting to whisk me in comfort to KXLY. I’ll be driving myself to the studio in a Dodge pickup.

      My home office serves as the "staging" area for packing the coolers. Make note of the supplies on the floor next to the cooler-dishes, toothpicks, silverware, tongs, spatulas and kitchen towels.

      And yes, I am following the direct instructions of Mike the fish guy -- I bought a spray bottle at the "Dollar Store" so that I can keep our precious "display crab" wet on camera.

      + + +

      I’ve never cooked on the "Today Show" on NBC in New York. I’ve heard that cooks who appear on "Today" are escorted into what is called a "Green Room," catered with lush displays of fresh fruit, vegetable and cheese trays, pastries and a never-ending assortment of beverages to await their few moments of fame. We don’t have a "Green Room" at KXLY. What we have is a room used by the weekday news staff to script out the flow of the news programs.

      Not having a Green Room is a blessing in disguise. The atmosphere in the studio is very casual and I don’t have to sit in a cold, lonely room waiting for a perky intern to escort me to the studio. I wait in the studio.

      You learn to be patient and immodest around the crew -- these are the people who watch you unzip your pants in the studio. You pull out your shirt so they can thread a small microphone from your waist, underneath your shirt, up to your neck and then clip the little mouthpiece to your collar.

      The only style advice I ever got was from my co-host, Teresa Lukens, who cautioned me not to wear a striped or checked shirt on-camera-something about the pattern of my shirt being a distraction to the viewers. (And I thought the girth of my waist was more of a distraction to the viewers than the pattern of my shirt).

      I don’t wear a Chef’s coat, because I don’t consider myself a Chef. I’m a cook and I want the viewers to relate to my story and my personality with ease and comfort. I want them to feel comfortable going into their kitchens at home and creating the types of dishes they might have at a restaurant. I don’t want to scare them by thinking only a guy in a chef’s coat can cook good food.

      Our kitchen at KXLY comprises an electric, flat-top stove inserted into a formica cabinet on wheels, held in place with sandbags. We don’t have an oven, refrigerator, freezer or running water. We make do with what we have-and that’s why I bring my own spatulas, spoons and water bottle to spray the crab.

      After the "Pet for Adoption" segment, I’m allowed on the set to get ready. I usually have about 15 minutes to unpack the coolers, put the ingredients on display and get the stove-top heated.

      We begin our cooking segment with a 30-second lead-in, usually after the local sports report. Teresa introduces the dish we’ll be doing and then we break to another commercial. I don’t have a lot of time to grill shrimp when we go live on KLXY -- only four minutes total for cooking time and discussion of the dish with my co-host. I’m lucky to have Teresa as my host. She knows food and cooking. She knows that prosciutto is cured Italian ham and she knows it’s thin and slightly salty. She knows to ask if smaller prawns will work for the recipe. And without prompting, she’ll ask why I’m using fresh Dungeness crab instead of canned lump crab meat. At the end of the segment we cut to one last commercial.

      As we come back live, Rick and Teresa are their normally gracious selves, tasting the stuffed shrimp and declaring it delicious. The show is a wrap.

      One more taste-test lies ahead before we can bring this journey to an end. What will the crew say about my "Shrimp Stuffed with Crab?"

      They tell me the stuffed shrimp were delicious. But you know what they really liked? What impressed them the most? The radishes.

      About a week after Sunday’s show, I went back to Williams Seafood to get some photos of the shop for this story.

      I find Mike behind the counter cutting fresh tuna steaks.

      "At least it looked fresh this time," he says.

      + + +

      Epilogue

      Shortly after I finished this piece, I began working with KXLY on our next cooking segment, which was scheduled to take place on Sunday, November 16.

      The plan was to cook some unique side dishes that the home cook could easily do to accompany the holiday turkey or prime rib. At least that was the plan until I picked up the local newspaper on November 2.

      When I turned to the business section, I saw the ominous news: "KXLY cancels weekend news program." I immediately contacted the producer.

      I had been cancelled -- a victim of the horrible state of the economy. I felt like I had been kicked in the gut. Cancelled after seven years and dozens of live cooking segments. Cancelled.

      Because "Sunday Morning Northwest" wasn’t the lead-in program to "Good Morning America," on the weekdays, it relied heavily on local advertising for its survival. ABC wouldn’t (and KXLY couldn’t) carry the burden of producing a local show that didn’t feed into network programming.

      With so many local businesses filing for bankruptcy and others literally closing the doors, one of the first budget items to go was television advertising -- advertising revenue that paid to produce "Sunday Morning Northwest."

      I wasn’t the only on-air "personality" to get the pink slip. The weekend weather "person" also got her walking papers. Rick and Teresa Lukens returned to the security of the KXLY-AM 920 radio booth and continue with their weekday morning drive-time show.

      And I have taken an unwanted leave of absence from local television. At least for a few months.

      Loyalty is not a word that is highly regarded in the television business. If ABC cancels you, you talk to NBC and so I’ve shifted my ambitions to KHQ -- the local NBC affiliate.

      KHQ airs a local morning program seven days a week. So if the culinary Gods are praying for me, someday soon I’ll begin doing a live cooking segment on the "KHQ Morning News."

      * * *

      David Ross lives in Spokane, but works a one-hour plane ride away. When he's not tending to his day job -- or commuting -- he writes about food, reviews restaurants and -- obviously -- does food presentation. He is on the eGullet Society hosting team for the Culinary Culture and Kitchen forums.
    • By Smokeydoke
      After a delightful brunch at Koslow's Sqirl restaurant in Los Angeles, I've decided to attempt to cook through her cookbook. I'll post my results here.
       
      Please follow along and join in, if you're so inclined. Her food is wonderful, but I will surmise that her true deliciousness comes from using the best and freshest ingredients. I'll do my best to recreate the magic I felt at Sqirl.
       
      Here's the link to her book at Eat Your Books.
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    • By Kasia
      ALMOND CUSCUS WITH CRANBERRIES AND PINEAPPLE
       
      I hate getting up in the morning. My household knows that before 8 o'clock I'm unbearable, and because almost every day I wake up much earlier, I tend to be unbearable more frequently than I want. Every extra five minutes of sleep is priceless, so I appreciate a good breakfast that is not too complicated and is quick to prepare.

      Recently, I have been preparing breakfast with groats and flakes. This time I chose cuscus. This product is a cross between pasta and groats, and it doesn't need long to prepare. It is enough to add hot water or milk and leave for a few minutes. I added some fresh pineapple, cranberries and banana. I spiced it up with some hot chili pepper .

      Ingredients (for 2 people)
      125g of cuscus
      400ml of almond milk
      1 tablespoon of honey
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      2 slices of fresh pineapple
      1 teaspoon of minced chili pepper
      150g of fresh cranberries
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 banana
      4 tablespoons of flaked almonds

      Wash the cranberries and put them into a pot. Add two tablespoons of water and the brown sugar. Boil, stirring gently until the cranberries burst and the sauce has thickened. Boil the almond milk with the vanilla essence. Pour the milk onto the cuscus and leave for 5-7 minutes. Slice the banana and roast the almond flakes. Peel the pineapple and dice it. Mix the pineapple, chili pepper and honey. Add the pineapple to the cuscus and mix it in. Put the mixture into two bowls. Put the cranberries and banana on the top and sprinkle with the almond flakes.

      Enjoy your meal!

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