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Ellen Shapiro

Waffles!

86 posts in this topic

If you want to buy a vintage waffle iron or get one fixed - try this place

http://www.toastercentral.com/index.htm

Some of my favorite waffles are made with cornmeal and topped with cheese and chili or taco fixings.

Holy cow....this is an AWESOME site!!


"She would of been a good woman," The Misfit said, "if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life."

--Flannery O'Connor, "A Good Man is Hard to Find"

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Oh Yeah!

I am VERY familiar with that site.

some of the evidence:

gallery_17399_60_1097542349.jpg


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I have a waffle story. It has some waffle ideas in it. Maybe it could be considered the nut in the middle of the bun of the thread. :smile: (Alternately, you could consider me the nut, whichever you prefer. :biggrin: )

......................................................................................................

A Waffle-y Wedded Wife

The television screen flickered out its digitally enhanced image into the room. The girl-woman beamed a tremulous smile, eyes angling out an electrical charge, fully loaded, emotionally explosive. The boy-man’s smooth face was rigid, somber, intent, with a tiny edge of fear. In unison they lifted their eyes to the man in robes before them.

“Do you take this woman to be your loving companion in life?” the robed man intoned. His tone was rather morose, I thought. Soberly, he glanced up at the groomed to glowing perfection young couple, removing his eyes from the small notebook held in his left hand.

As the young man opened his mouth to respond, a loud insistent protest arose from my side. “Mom!” It was my fourteen-year old daughter, interrupting this moment of televised ardor that filled our living room. A sharp moue of distaste lay upon her face, much like a pattern of light and shadow pushing through a windowpane to light just momentarily – a pattern that was able to flicker in the tiniest instant imaginable to yet another one entirely different – all emotions being available and irrepressible for girls at the age of fourteen. “Why aren’t they doing it the right way?!” she demanded.

I quickly turned to look at my daughter-who-likes-to-do-things-right, and carefully yet nonchalantly responded, “What do you mean?” My “mother’s sense” was suddenly alert, ready to pounce upon questions of morality, more than ready to happily dole out the age-old lessons mothers are ready, even anxious, to pull out from silent internal files, shelved but not forgotten.

“They aren’t saying it right, Mom. They’re supposed to ask if he will take her as his waffle-y wedded wife” my daughter informed me, her voice drenched in righteous indignation.

I wanted to laugh. I responded, “That’s “lawfully” wedded they usually say. Not “waffle-y”, sweetheart.”

“Wow. Really?” she replied with a bit of awe. For this idea, one word heard the wrong way, now corrected, had now changed the world for her. It shifted it to a different shape than before. “Wow. I always thought it was ‘waffle-y’!”

Now, I’ve been a wife before. I’ve even been a lawfully wedded one. But never a waffle-y wedded one! What a notion! What would it be like, to be a waffle-y wedded wife?

………………………………………………………………………

Mrs. Waffle pushed the lower half of the solid Dutch door. It made a satisfying creaking noise as she entered her bright cheerful kitchen. It was seven o’clock, a sunny morning. Mrs. Waffle always set foot into her kitchen this exact time, for she was nothing if not a very contented creature of habit. A fat brown bird with a red and blue face perched outside the kitchen window, staring into the room, cocking his head sideways first one way then the other. His impish curiosity made it seem as if the scene had been prepared for his own personal entertainment.

He lived in the apple tree set to the side of the kitchen garden, the part of the garden neatly bedded into squares. The rest of the garden looked as if Peter Rabbit and Flopsy Bunny would appear if you called for them. It was a wild and woolly garden, patches of colors intense, melding into an Impressionist blaze in late summer, complete with white picket fence, paint peeling slightly, hints of a moss green peeking from under the white glaze. The gate was just the perfect touch ajar, in a most welcoming manner.

Mrs. Waffle had not known anything at all about how it was to live as a waffle-y wedded wife before her marriage. This way of being was certainly not within the experiences of her other friends who had married. She thought of her life now, and smiled. She gazed at the lines of sun in repose striking the kitchen table, dust motes dancing along them like tiny angels searching for a pin to sit upon in the dense lemon-yellow rays.

Lemon-yellow! That reminded her of waffles.

Breakfast would soon be ready for Mr. Waffle. Millet-buckwheat-coconut waffles this morning, with a sweet dollop of lemon curd lovingly set on top just before the first bite. A bold shiny lemon was found, the zester disentangled from its dark quiet home in the kitchen drawer, and Mrs. W set to work. The spiced scent of citrus rose like a fortune of glittering delights. It filled the room, undertones of peace invoked, memories of a day spent lying on hot sand at the seashore. Mrs W’s mind wandered. Lunch - what would be for lunch?

Mr. Waffle would be traveling into the City. It was his turn today – tomorrow it would be Mrs. Waffle’s turn, for naturally they shared the balance of going forth into the world of business (just as they shared all things). Mr. W had insisted upon this early in their marriage – he’d said that was the waffle way.

Something quick and easy to eat was needed. Her long experience of Mr. Waffle’s tastes and desires within this state of waffle-y wedded bliss left Mrs. W with a sure knowledge of what to make. Two thick bacon-cornmeal waffles studded within with fresh corn kernels . . .a few slices of smoked gouda, a layer of apple butter softly wedged in between their embrace, a side of sugary-spiced pecans. That should do it.

………………………………………………………………..

The day passed so surprisingly quickly, filled with its small domestic pleasures. She listened to the music from the house next door, as her neighbor Wanda Fibswapper played her new piano, various pieces, some strange, some boldly vibrating with an intended jazz rhythm. Wanda had taken up the piano late in life, and it was always good for a bit of entertaining chat in the neighborhood as to which style or piece she would be playing, today or tomorrow.

Dinner time was here, and Mrs.W readied her skillets and waffle-irons with an almost war-like dexterity. It was to be the night of rice waffles sided with a crispy fried chicken. The chicken needed to be made just right, to send out its burst of essential juices when teeth hit it, the entire dish all toppled over with cream sauce endowed with a mere hint of maple syrup, all tossed wildly together with sizzled crunchy thin bits of dense salty ham.

………………………………………………………………………

How had it happened? It was dark out, yet a full moon sent a sliver of light over the top of the blinds as Mrs. W moved closer in the bed to the silent heaviness of her sleeping husband, He was solidly asleep, slightly snoring. Her eyes blinked, she started to doze, and images arose. The waffle-weave blanket that covered her somehow lifted her into the night sky. It opened, and with a little “snap!” turned itself into a magic carpet, glittering with jewel-like paisley designs. The carpet was soft, deep, warm. It flew through the star-lit sky, winging around with abandon through the air with such a flagrant sense of magnificence and utter unadulterated freedom. Then the carpet became a waffle, but no matter how hard she squinted, tossing round on it, laying flat down and even placing her face right up against the uneven surface of it, she could not quite make out what kind of waffle it was. Her husband’s own waffles, the ones he made for her, spun delicately with brilliant happy sparks like shooting stars, circling through the night air around her. Thick heart-shaped bittersweet double-chocolate waffles sensually topped with crunchy caramelized bananas. . . orange-almond-cumin waffles ladled with a rich heady creamy curried quail. . . oh! She loved his lemon thyme waffles luxurious with the fresh lobster claws holding hands on top, dotted with jewel-like aromatics in that pink vodka sauce. . . or the seven-grain waffle sandwich stuffed with Greek salad drizzled with biting tahini sauce. . .ah! There, those dreamy rosewater–peach waffles were dancing by her, twirling in the air with divine insouciance as she watched, the two round smiling matching curves of strawberry sorbet and lemon gelato glistening on top as they shimmered by in the night. So much waffle-y bliss! Mrs. Waffle slid further into dreamland with a sigh, dove deeply into dreamland, smiling in her sleep, and moving just a hint of a touch closer to Mr. W, she felt a spark. Just like water hitting a waffle iron that was ready to cook. She edged closer, ready.

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I like waffles.

The Pilgrims knew about waffles, for they had spent time in Holland before coming to these shores. They used to have waffle parties. I think it's doubtful they put ice-cream on their waffles, though. But I could be wrong.

There used to be a favorite waffle recipe used in Baltimore in past times - waffles with kidney stew.

(Source: The Oxford Companion to Food)

Sounds delicious.

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Try http://www.goldenmalted.com

I buy the two 33 ounce cans of the original flour.

I love this stuff - it produces the best waffles I've ever tasted.

Id have to agree there. Williams Sonoma also carries this mix and sometimes you can find it at Home Goods or Marshalls.

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We've tried them all, and the verdict is in (remember, we have waffles almost every weekend). Buttermilk. Eggs separated, and whites beaten. Flavoured don't quite fit the bill, the yeasted ones were good, but those buttermilk ones....


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

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my waffle secret to rich but light- buy mix with no fat in it so you can use butter- (peperidge farm is my fave)

and then, cut in the butter cold, makes it very rich but still light! ...... i usually do the whole box at once and freeze it.

i also always separate the eggs and fold in an extra white or so.....

my fave add in : fresh grated orange peel and pecans, or lemon peel and walnuts. if you add a little bit of sugar to the recipe, you dont need but a drop of syrup.

yum!

i'm going to have to try the yeast raised now......

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Waffles at North Shore Country Club in Mequon Wisconsin are the best i have ever had. They use Golden Dipt Belgian Waffle Mix http://www.goldendipt.com/pages/master.html

and a commercial maker.

Waffles making is simple, the more watts or heat the maker has the thicker the waffle web. Simple home makers sold just don't have the heat therefore the webs are thin. I have a Kitchenaid ProLine which makes a very good waffle but I should have paid for a commercial maker, it's just not the same.-Dick

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I was directed to this forum by a search for Liege waffles, but either I missed it or just the waffle part was matched by the search engine. In either case, I am looking for some guidance on how to replicate the waffles that I rember buying on the streets of Brussels. Sweet, yeasty, chewey, dense. I tried some years ago to develop a yeasted waffle recipe but while it was OK, it was not a match to what I remember. And since I am about to start the quest again and I thought I would first query the expertise here before I bumble off on my own.

Doc

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I was directed to this forum by a search for Liege waffles, but either I missed it or just the waffle part was matched by the search engine.  In either case, I am looking for some guidance on how to replicate the waffles that I rember buying on the streets of Brussels.  Sweet, yeasty, chewey, dense.  I tried some years ago to develop a yeasted waffle recipe but while it was OK, it was not a match to what I remember.  And since I am about to start the quest again and I thought I would first query the expertise here before I bumble off on my own.

Doc

Liege waffles were mentioned earlier in this thread as being from Everybody Eats Well in Belgium Cookbook by Ruth Van Waerebeekand. There is also a photo. It's in a post on the second page of the thread.

Good luck.


Becky

"I don't like to say that my kitchen is a religious place, but I would say that if I were a voodoo priestess, I would conduct my rituals there."-- Pearl Bailey

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First time using our newly bought waffle maker!

These are Vietnamese-style waffles known as Banh Kep La Dua. If anyone's wondering why the waffles have a strange green hue and are wiping their monitor screens, don't. These are pandan waffles :raz:

Did it cheat's way with a box of pancake mix, rice flour, eggs, water (can be replaced with milk but dad's lactose intolerant though he's consumed some dairy products before hmm), sugar and pandan essence.

3102532026_ae65f3b8d5_o.jpg


Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

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i wouldn't suppose that the method using the egg whites folded in would keep very well in the refrigerator eh?


Danny

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no they will collapse.

but you can keep the whites seperate unwhipped and mix the rest the day before, and whip and fold them in the last minute.

also if there's other leavening, that should go in later too.

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yea thats what i was thinking =/

just trying to find a good waffle recipe that i can keep over a few days time...i'm volunteering at a local camp and for dessert were having a dessert waffle bar so we want to make it as easy as we can but every waffle batter i've tried comes up floppy and soft...not crunchy like i want em haha

after much reading i see the best way for that maybe the only way is folding in egg whites....how does waffle house do it? i'm sure they just make tons of batter every day right?

do the yeast waffle batters get the same way? or relatively close?


Danny

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. . .

after much reading i see the best way for that maybe the only way is folding in egg whites....how does waffle house do it? i'm sure they just make tons of batter every day right?

. . .

That is correct. It's a proprietary formula that's mixed with water. Like many chain restaurants, what Waffle House is named for isn't necessarily the best thing on the menu.


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk

8 T butter

2 cups AP flour

1 T sugar

1 t salt

1 1/2 t yeast

2 eggs

1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk

8 T butter

2 cups AP flour

1 T sugar

1 t salt

1 1/2 t yeast

2 eggs

1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).

Yea,....

I'd say those look pretty damned perfect!


And this old porch is like a steaming greasy plate of enchiladas,With lots of cheese and onions and a guacamole salad ...This Old Porch...Lyle Lovett

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The blogger Orangette contributes a great deal of scholarship on the subject, and popularized a recipe named "Waffles of Insane Greatness" -- WIG:

My link

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Thanks for the link, Frank: I'll have to give Marion Cunningham’s a shot next and see how they stack up: I see that Orangette ranked them ahead of the CI recipe I just tried. The WIG recipe sounds good, too, but I think I'd miss the yeastiness that these raised waffles bring to the table. Plus, with a little planning ahead, making breakfast in the morning is just a matter of heating up the iron and pouring the batter, which in the AM is about all the energy I can muster!


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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I've had the best luck using essentially Marion Cunningham's ingredients with the CI overnight-in-the-fridge technique.

MelissaH


MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Chris-what type of waffle iron do you use? Your waffles are beautiful. I bought a Cuisinart deep waffle iron last year and I love it. I do admit thought that I cheat and don't make my own batter. I've tried making it from scratch using the egg white recipe and while good, it never equals the powdered mix I buy-Carbon's Golden Malted Waffle Mix. It's the old-time diner mix they've been making since 1937. Delicious.

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