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Red Wine in the Frig


Craig Camp
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When it is warm I like reds that take a slight chill. We tend to eat outside everyday so I will pop a bottle in the frig about an hour before eating. For instance last night we grilled some freshly made chicken sausages, treviso radicchio and tomino del boscaiolo cheese (yes you grill the cheese too) and served a lightly chilled 2002 Kettmeir Lago di Caldaro, which matched perfectly with the meal and the evening.

My summer favorites:

The fresh, light reds of Alto Adige and Trentino - Schiava/Vernatsch and Marzemino.

Beaujolais - of course

Grignolino from Piemonte

Barbera Vivace from Piemonte

Cotes du Rhone

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For the past few weeks my personal summer red of choice has been Argyle reserve pinot noir that I was able to score in half-bottles last year at the winery. I throw one on ice about 45 minutes before I'm going to crack it open. Gives two generous pours in a big Spiegelau burgundy stem and goes with just about anything. I'm going to be really bummed when I run through the case.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
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Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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The sparkling reds I've tried have been novelty wines -- interesting to taste once, but not commercially viable.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Speaking of chilled reds, what's the story with the sparkling shiraz that's now coming out of Australia?  Is it worth tracking down, or is it just a novelty?

I with FG on this - a novelty. Although they are not bad with some oriental and other hard to match foods.

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I've been drinking a lot of stuff from the Languedoc lately. They seem to take a chill pretty well and for the most part are inexpensive. Plus, they don't require intense examination. Just pull the cork and enjoy.

When does the rose thread start?

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For the past few weeks my personal summer red of choice has been Argyle reserve pinot noir that I was able to score in half-bottles last year at the winery. I throw one on ice about 45 minutes before I'm going to crack it open. Gives two generous pours in a big Spiegelau burgundy stem and goes with just about anything. I'm going to be really bummed when I run through the case.

I've got 2 bottles of that, I'll have to try chilling some.

Now, what I really, really want is some of their Blanc de Noir Extended Tirage 1991. I was able to pick up 6 bottles of their NV Brut for 15 bucks a shot (some customer decided they didnt want their case they ordered) from a local wine place in NJ (Total Wine, best prices in the area) but I can't find it.

Edit: Just ordered a 6 pack from Total Wine at 25 bucks a bottle, which is Argyle's case price on their website. The Argyle Rose, however, remains elusive.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

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I had a sparkling Valpolicella last year. It was quite sweet and very very expensive. Apparently it's quite rare.

Otherwise I'm drinking chilled Chinon and Saumur-Champigny and lots of rosé (I just tasted a nice one from Pic St-Loup and would kill to get my hands on a bottle of Mas Amiel rosé).

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Sparkling Lambrusco. Please don't laugh at me, it's actually quite good.

I believe someone posted about this a couple of weeks ago.

Laugh at you?! Lambrusco is right up my alley....

:biggrin:

"There is no worse taste in the mouth than chocolate and cigarettes. Second would be tuna and peppermint. I've combined everything, so I know."

--Augusten Burroughs

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Sparkling Lambrusco. Please don't laugh at me, it's actually quite good.

I believe someone posted about this a couple of weeks ago.

Laugh at you?! Lambrusco is right up my alley....

:biggrin:

Good fresh Lambrusco is a great summertime treat.

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I had a sparkling Valpolicella last year. It was quite sweet and very very expensive. Apparently it's quite rare.

Otherwise I'm drinking chilled Chinon and Saumur-Champigny and lots of rosé (I just tasted a nice one from Pic St-Loup and would kill to get my hands on a bottle of Mas Amiel rosé).

If it was very expensive it was probably Recioto della Valpolicella. It should be sweet but it really should not be sparking.

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I've been drinking a lot of stuff from the Languedoc lately. They seem to take a chill pretty well and for the most part are inexpensive. Plus, they don't require intense examination. Just pull the cork and enjoy.

When does the rose thread start?

Many wines from Languedoc are fairly complex and full of layers and surprises. The days of being regarded as the "wine lake" are over.

slowfood/slowwine

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I've got 2 bottles of that, I'll have to try chilling some.

Don't chill to Champagne temperature or anything like that, though. The idea, for me at least, is to get it to something like cellar temperature or just slightly lower (low 50s F). 45-60 minutes in the refrigerator max, or maybe 20 minutes in an ice bucket. Beyond that, the aromatics shut down and the sugars get out of whack.

Edit: Just ordered a 6 pack from Total Wine at 25 bucks a bottle, which is Argyle's case price on their website. The Argyle Rose, however, remains elusive.

Dreyfus Ashby handles Argyle, and should know every retailer that carries it. They should also be able to arrange to send whatever you want out to any retailer in their network.

http://www.dreyfusashby.com/index.htm

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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If it was very expensive it was probably Recioto della Valpolicella. It should be sweet but it really should not be sparking.

No no, it was sparkling. It was a Bertani Recioto Spumante, Valpolicella Valpantena.

This was at a Valpolicella tasting dinner that included Recioto as well. The sparkling Valpolicella was with a chocolate and cherry dessert. Very nice, if a bit intense. They say it should be served at 12 degrees.

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Now, what I really, really want is some of their Blanc de Noir Extended Tirage 1991.

I had the good fortune to taste the 1991 Argyle Extended Tirage a couple of weeks ago, and it was stunning. It has this enormous hazelnut finish that lingers seemingly forever.

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Speaking of chilled reds, what's the story with the sparkling shiraz that's now coming out of Australia?  Is it worth tracking down, or is it just a novelty?

I with FG on this - a novelty. Although they are not bad with some oriental and other hard to match foods.

These are far from novelties at this stage and in australia are proving to be very commercially viable; The Rockford Black Sparking is selling out within two months of being released, others are getting very popular and it is now becoming uncommon to find a wine list without them. While I wouldn't put one with steak, the good sparkling reds go excellently with duck, turkey and game dishes. They are going well beyond Shiraz at this stage into blends, straight merlots, cabernets and Chambourcing is becoming increasingly popular, with makers like D'Arenberg making a very good one.

I believe that Bollinger has made a sparkling red aswell.

'You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.'

- Frank Zappa

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Chilled French reds - Touraine Gamay is great, just 20 mins in the frig.

On the sparkling red theme, look out for Bob Lindo's sparkling Camel Valley pinot noir from Cornwall, excellent drink if a bit pricey. Contact Slacker for more info on this.

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Cote du Ventoux, just down the road from Gigondas - fairly burly but not as complex as the better stuff from the area. Picked up a couple of bottles while in that area and during the tasting though they actually had a better flavor than the AOC Gigondas La Patronne poured for us. The good stuff went to the "cellar", the cheap stuff to the fridge.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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