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Portland farmer's market


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I took some new pics today at the market. They're at this link: http://www.extramsg.com/modules.php?set_al...=view_album.php Thought I'd pass along a few tidbits, too.

Fall produce is coming in. Corn and tomatoes, of course. Many varieties of tomatoes. Even some apples and pears that were decent. Garlic, gourds, pumpkins, and, best of all, imo, chanterelles. $8/lb was typical.

Elizabeth was out of chocolates, dammit, and is off to be married. Won't be back til October.

LOW's Q was excellent today. I went before the Bones and Brew thing (post and pics to come). Tip: apparently the brisket builds a nice crust on it as it sits waiting to be eaten. So the later you can get their brisket, the better, if you like burnt ends and bark. The pork ribs (they were out of lamb) was very nice. Would have been the second best ribs on my recent BBQ trip to Memphis, KC, etc. Nothing was even close at the Bones and Brew thing and I tried everyone's that I hadn't tried before (7 or 8 places, I think).

Misty Mountain has huge bags of dried mushrooms (along with their fresh mushrooms, which are probably a little overpriced by comparison). The one that really tempted me -- luckily I'm broke -- was the 1 lb bag of porcinis for $50. Looked and smelled great. That's a fair price, too. There was a half pound of nice morels, too, for $50. They also had porcini powder, which at $7 for a 1.5 ounces, is a little overpriced, probably. But I love the stuff. Nothing better for adding a nice punch of mushroom to stews and soups and sauces.

asianproduce3.sized.jpg

Edited by ExtraMSG (log)
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  • 6 months later...

I just loaded the truck and am about to head down to set up. Here's the email I sent out earlier with some info about this year's oils.

The Portland Farmers Market opens earlier than ever this year, and I’ll be there this Saturday, April 2, in the Park Blocks by PSU. I’ve got freshly pressed extra virgin olive oil from Tuscany and Umbria (yes, the Bettini is back!), the Arbequina from California Olive Ranch, and a little Sicilian oil from last year (it’s still delicious). And salt, of course.

The Italian oils from the 2004 harvest are just a little less pungent this year (that’s the official term for that “peppery” taste), but they’re nicely balanced. Sabina Nenna from the Novo Frantoio describes the Olio Novo as “a little sweeter.”

The COR Arbequina, on the other hand, is a bit more pungent and similar to the 2003 oil, the first year of production for this newcomer. Morgon Brownlow at clarklewis has always used it in the kitchen, along with the Italian oils, but now he’s serving it with Ken’s bread as well. Most of you know that one of the reasons for my little business is going to Italy more often, but I may have to add beautiful Oroville to the itinerary.

Marco Bettini, the University of Perugia cardiologist who runs the family oil operation in Montefalco, is now a certified International Olive Oil Council taster, and he’s even more passionate about making the best oil available. He harvests early,so his yield of oil per kilo of fruit is lower, but the result is amazing. You Bettini addicts know what I’m talking about.

Caterina Minnisale operate the frantoio that presses Leonforte. She says that the 2004 harvest in the dry interior of Sicily wasn’t so good, and she decided not to send any oil this year because she felt it wasn’t quite as good as it could be. I’m lucky to have such honest suppliers. I’ve still got some of the 2003 oil, maybe 25 liters, so if you like it get it early.

A load of Madre Terra, the oil I first imported for clarklewis, is on its way from the SW coast of Sicily. I hope to have sometime in May. Ditto for Don Alfonso. I’ve got some of each left over from last year’s harvest, but quantities are limited.

If you haven’t tried the Necton flor de sal, well, about all I can say is that some of the flavor is missing from your table. I’m still amazed that something so simple can make such a difference. But don’t just take my word for it. Here’s what Pablo Neruda has to say (thanks to Mimi).

Ode to Salt

This salt

in the saltcellar

I once saw in the salt mines.

I know

you won't

believe me,

but

it sings,

salt sings, the skin

of the salt mines

sings

with a mouth smothered

by the earth.

I shivered in those solitudes

when I heard

the voice of

the salt

in the desert.

Near Antofagasta

the nitrous

pampa

resounds:

a broken

voice,

a mournful

song.

In its caves

the salt moans, mountain

of buried light,

translucent cathedral,

crystal of the sea, oblivion

of the waves.

And then on every table

in the world,

salt,

we see your piquant

powder

sprinkling

vital light

upon

our food. Preserver

of the ancient

holds of ships,

discoverer

on

the high seas,

earliest

sailor

of the unknown, shifting

byways of the foam.

Dust of the sea, in you

the tongue receives a kiss

from ocean night:

taste imparts to every seasoned

dish your ocean essence;

the smallest,

miniature

wave from the saltcellar

reveals to us

more than domestic whiteness;

in it, we taste infinitude.

Drop me a note if you'd like to be on my email list.

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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Remember, market opens today.
I just loaded the truck and am about to head down to set up.

I hate you both :raz: We're still better than a month away from our markets opening ...

Jim, are you still limited to specific weekends at the market? I'll be down for the Brewer's Festival again in July and hope to score some oil!

And I assume Lowe's will still be there?? Please??

A.

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I'll let Jim answer about what markets he'll be at, but I can tell you it's LOW BBQ, cuz it stands for Laid Off Workers (get it?). Rodney and Kyle are doing their BBQ thing on Monday nights only at Apizza Scholls, no markets. Hopefully you can stay through till Monday? I'm guessing if Jim won't be there he'll tell you you can pick it up at his house, but if that gets too complicated I'd be happy to stash some for you, I go shopping at every farmer's market and could meet up with you.

regards,

trillium

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Like last year, I'll be at the market one Saturday each month. I think May 14th is my next appearance, but I need to find the note I scrawled to myself to make sure. Eventually I'll post the dates on my web site.

If you need oil or salt before then, send me an email. I have many customers who drop by to pick up their fix.

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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My market lunch of choice is one of Fred Carlo's sausages, served with grilled onions and peppers on roll. There's also good pizza and a couple of other vendors with prepared food.

You might also check out Alma Chocolates, delicious (and beautiful) chocolates by my friend Sara Hart.

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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Besides the maitaake mushrooms, stinging nettle, leeks, and cheese, last Saturday I got some pickled stuff from Picklopolis. It's the vinegary arm of Three Square Grill, and David Barber and crew make great stuff. I got carrots with a little heat and, I think, some cumin as well as cippolini onions.

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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I had nettles the week before. This week I bought fiddleheads from the mushroom guys. We ate them last night. They had less flavor then last year, and a yucky (to me) okra-like texture! Oh no. Seasonal variation? Maturity? Species? Dunno.

Tried the raw milk Gouda from Willamette Valley cheeses. Disappointingly bland, compared to similiar ones hauled back from Amsterdam. Oregon needs a good cow milk cheese person who makes something other then the blues. Oregon Gourmet Cheeses and their Sublimity hasn't been the same since they lost the guy who was also making those transcendent raw milk Camembert style cheeses.

Beautiful Chez Panisse grade tiny white turnips from Deep Roots and so-green-it-hurts-your-eyes spinach from Square Peg Farms. Dandilion greens from the backyard.

regards,

trillium

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Okay, admitted newbie to both eG and Portland....

I have been following the opening of the farmer's market, but have not gone yet (last weekend was the first opportunity) because I figured it was just too soon....

I loved farmer's markets in previous cities for fresh, mid summer veggies and fruits like tomatoes, greens, peaches, etc....

What can I expect from the P-land market in the early season? Can anyone suggest a strategy for attending that takes into account my limited mobility? (Can't do stairs - even a curb is challenging without armrail support...)

Look forward to meeting fellow eGulleters in Portland!

Thanks, Julia

"Anybody can make you enjoy the first bite of a dish, but only a real chef can make you enjoy the last.”

Francois Minot

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You should probably read through my blog report with pictures:

http://www.extramsg.com/modules.php?name=N...article&sid=212

There are regularly people in wheelchairs who attend and there is a place to pull in with ramp access quite close. There aren't many stairs, but it's not perfectly flat either.

What can I expect from the P-land market in the early season?  Can anyone suggest a strategy for attending that takes into account my limited mobility?  (Can't do stairs - even a curb is challenging without armrail support...)

Edited by ExtraMSG (log)
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Okay, admitted newbie to  both eG and Portland....

I have been following the opening of the farmer's market, but have not gone yet (last weekend was the first opportunity) because I figured it was just too soon....

I loved farmer's markets in previous cities for fresh, mid summer veggies and fruits like tomatoes, greens, peaches, etc....

What can I expect from the P-land market in the early season?  Can anyone suggest a strategy for attending that takes into account my limited mobility?  (Can't do stairs - even a curb is challenging without armrail support...)

Look forward to meeting fellow eGulleters in Portland!

Thanks, Julia

You can expect a lot of greens, root vegetables, and things that are cool season crops (like broccoli) right now, the stuff you think of as midsummer doesn't really hit until August around here. New potatoes and peas haven't showed up yet. It took us a few years to get used to waiting that long for good tomatoes, in Chicago they started in early July.

From a mobility standpoint, I don't think you'll run into too many problems, but I suggest you come when the market starts at 8:30 if crowds are a problem. It starts getting crowded around 10:30.

regards,

trillium

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  • 2 weeks later...

We got some flour last week from Columbia Plateau Growers, a high-gluten flour called Shepard's Grain. I'm using it for pizza dough tonight. They are new to the market and we were their first customer ever at the market. They were so thrilled, they took our picture with one of them handing us the five-pound bag of flour. They also sell beans, lentils, garbanzos, and wheat berries.

We also got some terrific morels from the mushroom guy in the corner. He had some that were as big as globe artichokes, but we stuck to the smaller ones. We separately sauteed the mushrooms, fiddleheads (I agree, not the best I've had), and pea shoots, and mixed together with bit of pesto (minus the cheese) that I had frozen from last year's crop of basil. Delicious.

I don't remember the names of some of the other vendors, but we also got some grass-fed veal from a new meat vendor. Looks good, but we haven't had it yet. Also, we purchased some Dukkah, an Egyptian spice mix that contains chopped hazel nuts, sesame seeds, paprika, tumeric, and "spices." It was terrific, but you can easily make your own given the inspiration after tasting it. It's a lot like Za'tar but without the fresh herbs.

We also got bourbon liver pate from the pate guy. It's really good, but he doesn't have it all the time.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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One more fabulous tidbit I can't get out of my mind from last week is Viande's pork & rabbit rillettes with prunes. Had to re-stock at their shop mid-week. It's impossible to resist!

Indeed! Viande is where we got the pate. BTW, the pizza dough turned out great. I believe the flour is higher gluten than what I usually use because it absorbed more moisture. The pizza recipe, from Crust and Crumb, was the tastiest, easiest to handle pizza crust I've ever made (though I might back down on the honey a bit next time). The last time I made it, the dough was a bit wet and sticky. But with this flour, it was perfect.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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I don't remember the names of some of the other vendors, but we also got some grass-fed veal from a new meat vendor.  Looks good, but we haven't had it yet.

Travis Potter is the one growing that veal. It looks very similar to the stuff they sell in Italy. He is also selling pastured Berkshire pork. I'm pretty excited he's here, and I'm hoping he'll start selling more braising and roasting cuts and less stuff cut to look like a pork chop (don't do that to those beautiful legs and shoulders!).

The first new potatoes of the season showed up at that corner stand that used to be called Rojo. Can't remember what their new name is. Anyhow, they're always earlier then everyone else because they do so much cold framing and greenhouse growing. I think it makes for a terrible strawberry, but I can't resist the potatoes, even though they cost a small fortune. They're best steamed, I boiled some this weekend and way overcooked them. Asparagus has been very tasty too, and I bought some really beautiful and tasty French breakfast radishes from Square Peg farms. They are so wonderfully grown, crisp, little, and tender, that you can even eat the green tops.

regards,

trillium

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I'm headed to Portland this weekend and thinking of checking out the market. I haven't been yet this year and I am so excited! I can't recall the name of the vendor, but last year there was a gal selling organic vegan truffles. Soooo tasty. I will have to bring some home with me, along with a variety of cheeses from several of the different vendors.

In addition, I am going to make sure that I visit Apizza Scholls for the first time. After reading through the pizza threads here, I have been yearning to take a trip down just for the pizza. Our usual tradition is Flying Pie or Hot Lips, but I have a feeling that Apizza Scholls will be well worth a try.

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Dear Consacrer,

Wingnut (the vegan truffles) aren't at the PSU Saturday farmer's market anymore but you CAN find them at Wholefoods on NW Burnside.

Elizabeth

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Besides the maitaake mushrooms, stinging nettle, leeks, and cheese, last Saturday I got some pickled stuff from Picklopolis. It's the vinegary arm of Three Square Grill, and David Barber and crew make great stuff. I got carrots with a little heat and, I think, some cumin as well as cippolini onions.

Jim

I checked out your website (the link is missing a 'w' from 'www', by the way) and darn it! You won't be at the market this weekend! I was going to ask my mother to pick me up some salt...just to try :smile:

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the link is missing a 'w' from 'www', by the way

d'oh!

Thanks...I fixed it.

While I won't have a booth today, I will be at the market shopping (and overseeing my own oil-for-food program), and I'm always packing a little salt and oil. Next time send me an email and we can arrange to meet...many customers also stop by my warehouse (aka the garage) when they need more salt or oil between market appearances.

For you PFM regulars...if you haven't tried Greener Pastures' chicken livers yet, pick some up (go early since they often sell out). They're incredibly good, like some new kind of offal comapred even to the livers from the better chicken suppliers at the supermarket. I usually make cibreo, but lately have been trying to replicate Uncle Margaret's chicken liver ragu from the Gotham Bdlg Tavern.

For cibreo, saute a diced leek in butter, add the livers after dredging in flour (and salt and papper), and chop them coarsely while they cook with a spatula (or chop them first). Splash in a little chicken stock as they cook so you get a little roux going. When the livers are cooked, remove from the heat and stir in an egg yolk that you've beaten with a little lemon juice. Spread on crostini...

Jim

olive oil + salt

Real Good Food

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While I won't have a booth today, I will be at the market shopping (and overseeing my own oil-for-food program), and I'm always packing a little salt and oil. Next time send me an email and we can arrange to meet...many customers also stop by my warehouse (aka the garage) when they need more salt or oil between market appearances.

I'll definitely remember that for next time. My mother is just in the area till tomorrow and didn't let me know she might be going till yesterday! I, however, I'm trying to find a way to get out to Portland sometime this summer. I love the farmer's market!

For you PFM regulars...if you haven't tried Greener Pastures' chicken livers yet, pick some up (go early since they often sell out). They're incredibly good, like some new kind of offal comapred even to the livers from the better chicken suppliers at the supermarket. I usually make cibreo, but lately have been trying to replicate Uncle Margaret's chicken liver ragu from the Gotham Bdlg Tavern.

Now my mother's really going to be disappointed about missing that! She loves chicken livers!

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I'll second (or third) the recommendation for the chicken livers. I confess to having bad liver experiences as a child (midwestern mom who overcooked everything and made us eat horribly overcooked liver), so I'm sensitive to things that are too "intensely livery." But, when cooked with a deft hand, the Greener Pastures livers are terrific. At Wordstock the other week, Cory Schrieber, from Wildwood Restaurant, was also praising them.

Check out our Fooddoings and more at A View from Eastmoreland
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Now try the hearts... they're very tasty too.

Besides the western European applications (grilled, spreads for breads, pasta sauce, mashed up to enrich a gravy, etc) the livers are super tasty stir-fried with green onions, ginger and oyster sauce or in Nonya style curry.

regards,

trillium

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