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Cabbage soup. Can be frozen. Here's a recipe for a Jewish-Hungarian variation:

http://robertsmarketreport.blogspot.com/2014/02/winter-vegetable-hungarian-accent.html?m=1

Totally forgot about that.

One Russian version is shchi. There's a recipe here. If I recall correctly, there's another style, but with fresh cabbage instead of sauerkraut.

And now that I think about it, bigos also features cabbage.

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When I was a kid, had an "old" couple living nextdoor.  Couldn;t have been THAT old since their 14-15 yo daughter baby sat from time to time.  Mrs. Bledsoe mad FRIED cabbage!!  She's start with a few strips of bacon... rendered and crispy... and retrieved till end.  Chunked upcabbage in bacon fat, a slsh of vinegar and bacon added at the end.  YUMMY!!

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Schi is wonderful stuff, but we have never made it. Some of our favorite cabbage dishes:

 

Stir-fried green cabbage with fennel seeds, from Quick & Easy Indian Cooking. This is one of my favorite dishes, period.

 

p69662977-4.jpg

 

Cabbage and egg stir-fry, from Into the Vietnamese Kitchen

 

p138844465-4.jpg

 

World’s best braised cabbage, from All About Braising

 

p1347751880-4.jpg

 

Braised cabbage with dried shrimp, from Cradle of Flavor

 

p816776742-4.jpg

 

Hand-torn cabbage with vinegar, from Revolutionary Chinese Cooking (couldn’t find a picture)

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Shred cabbage into a buttered casserole dish.  Pour a can of evaporated milk (I suppose you could use half and half) over just to cover the cabbage about half way. Add salt and pepper. Top with lots of buttered bread crumbs and bake until bubbly and brown.  

 

Even non-cabbage eaters like this.

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sparrowgrass
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I love slaw, and make all sorts of dressings for it -tamarind anyone?

 

If it's Napa cabbage, though, I personally would make eggrolls.

Tamarind slaw dressing! I love tamarind, but hadn't thought about this use. Care to share your recipe, Lisa?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Tamarind slaw dressing! I love tamarind, but hadn't thought about this use. Care to share your recipe, Lisa?

 

I don't have a set recipe, just a general set of guidelines. It kind of depends on what form your tamarind is in. Various pastes and concoctions can have varying strengths of flavor. I thought of this one day, as I was trying to make a tart salad to go with an Indian style meal.

 

Essentially, just mix the following ingredients and adjust amounts to taste. Generally, vinegar will have the largest volume of all the ingredients. I had a tamarind syrup (like for making drinks or snow cones) for a while that I'd simply add white wine vinegar and salt to, and that was about it. If you have a jar of plain paste, mix it with vinegar (I prefer white wine vinegar, but, rice wine vinegar, seasoned rice wine vinegar, apple cider vinegar or even plain white will work), a sweetener (sugar is fine, brown or raw sugar is very good, jaggery adds umami and is wonderfully tasty), a little salt and maybe black pepper. If you have the whole tamarind beans, shell them, remove the big fibers and seeds, and grind in a mortar and pestle with a little vinegar until you have a paste and then stir in vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper.

 

Sometimes, I add freshly ground cumin in small amounts. It's tasty, but, it depends on if I have already used cumin in other dishes I am serving -a concern if I am making an Indian or Mexican meal.

 

Good luck, I hope it works for you!

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Stuffed cabbage can be fun.

 

People will try to figure out how the stuffing got inside a head of cabbage.

 

dcarch

 

stuffedcabbage4.jpg

 

stuffedcabbage2.jpg

This looks tasty.  Never had stuffed cabbage like that.  What is it stuffed with?

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I make a slaw that keeps wonderfully in the fridge, and I a almost never without a dish of it on hand. Great on sandwiches (particularly pork barbecue), and with anything that needs a tart accompaniment.

  • 1 head cabbage, shredded
  • Carrots, bell pepper, onion, to your taste, minced. Toss all raw veggies well together in a large bowl that has an airtight cover.

Make dressing of:

  • 1 cup vinegar (any kind is good, but I generally use cider)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp celery seed
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper

Bring to a boil, then pour over cabbage mix. Cover and let sit on counter for a couple of hours. Shake to redistribute, and put in the fridge at least overnight before serving. Keeps for weeks. Marvelous in place of lettuce on a BLT, which would make it, I guess, a BST.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I make a slaw that keeps wonderfully in the fridge, and I a almost never without a dish of it on hand. Great on sandwiches (particularly pork barbecue), and with anything that needs a tart accompaniment.

  • 1 head cabbage, shredded
  • Carrots, bell pepper, onion, to your taste, minced. Toss all raw veggies well together in a large bowl that has an airtight cover.

Make dressing of:

  • 1 cup vinegar (any kind is good, but I generally use cider)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tbsp celery seed
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp white pepper

Bring to a boil, then pour over cabbage mix. Cover and let sit on counter for a couple of hours. Shake to redistribute, and put in the fridge at least overnight before serving. Keeps for weeks. Marvelous in place of lettuce on a BLT, which would make it, I guess, a BST.

 

 

We had slaw like that in North Carolina in a couple of BBQ joints, except that instead of celery seed, there were red pepper flakes.  Really good with a tray of outside meat and hush puppies!

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This looks tasty.  Never had stuffed cabbage like that.  What is it stuffed with?

 

Thanks. I cheated with the stuffing.

 

My " instant " stuffing: Lean ground turkey mixed with "Stove Top" stuffing.

 

dcarch

Edited by dcarch (log)
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Today's lunch featured the World's Best Braised Green Cabbage from Molly Stevens found on Kim Shook's website.  Thanks Kim.

DH said he'd never tasted cabbage that was so delicious...just before he began to give his additional directions:  more carrots please and maybe even some parsnips.

 

Still a great winner.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Pancit. It's been a while since I bought any cabbage but I think shredded cabbage freezes well - can anyone corroborate?

No, cabbage, like lettuce and celery doesn't freeze well. Once you thaw it it's is limp, water-logged and oxidizes quickly which effects its color, smell and flavor.

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My mom always made coleslaw with raisins and mandarins. Nice and sweet delight for a summery day.

That sounds interesting. What kind of dressing did she use? Was it sweet, tart, vinegary, eggy? What other ingredients were in it, along with the cabbage, raisins and mandarins?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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That sounds interesting. What kind of dressing did she use? Was it sweet, tart, vinegary, eggy? What other ingredients were in it, along with the cabbage, raisins and mandarins?

Sorry for the late respons, but she normally used unsweetened unwhipped cream as a dressing. The raisins and mandarins made it sweet enough. It had to be basic otherwise I didn't like it ;) 

 

Now I'm older I guess you can make this really funky with some vinegar and some spicyness, but when I was 8 only the tast 'sweet' concerned me tho ;p 

Edited by Thomas Luttikhold (log)

Waste Watcher

Spreading knowledge about anti-food waste.

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