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the chef is 9 times out of ten actually cooking and he has resisted the temptation to sell his soul to the media.

other than great british menu - which has had very credible chefs on it, what else has he done?

just think you're being a little harsh here!

you don't win friends with salad

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I am certainly not being harsh in anyway. Obviously there are loads of Kitchin fans on this site, so it seems I was one of the unlucky (truthful) ones. I could say it was fab, but it wasn't. It was a disappointing meal. What more can I say? Dare I say it, but I just couldn't see what the fuss was about. It may not be popular but I stand by everything I say on my experience here. The rump of lamb in question had to be returned to the 'kitchin' as it was badly overcooked. Not gonna stop the world spinning but it wasn't right. As for the pudds we had, they were very plain jane. Apples that were supposed to be crisps weren't, blahh blahh, As I recall the chef on GBM was pulled up on his desserts. Maybe the judges they were being harsh!

I also feel Wisharts is definately more the real deal. Some of the food we had was simply outstanding. For my money Wisharts should have two star status. Some may disagree but thats why restaurants are so subjective. Still love you Tom!!!!!

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i'm not disputing that you had a bad meal, i'm just puzzled that you think it's down to media/pr/tv etc that has built kitchins reputation? he's got a good background with koffman , got a star (fwiw) and garners many good reviews, and other than GBM i'm struggling to see what he's done , he hasn't done a book i don't think?

you make out like he's ainsley harriot!

i had a shit meal at the fat duck many moons ago and wild horses wouldn't make me go back but i wouldn't stop anyone from going and i wouldn't say it's a bad restaurant , built on pr etc i just didn't like it.

as i said i have no axe to grind, i've never met tom, eaten at his place or anything. it's just the joy of the internet that you can have lovely circular arguments all day :laugh:

you don't win friends with salad

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Gary, one last time, its NOT a bad eatrie, he's NOT a bad chef, Im NOT stopping anyone going, I haven't likened him to 'ready steady toss'. The place just didn't do it for me, which you seem to find hard to accept. The gaff has recieved absolutely tons of PR, through the trade press which is great for them. My argument goes further than the Kitchin, its the whole media celeb on the telly chef thing. Can we put this one to bed now, its more knackering than a service this!!!!!

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Gary, one last time, its NOT a bad eatrie, he's NOT a bad chef, Im NOT stopping anyone going, I haven't likened him to 'ready steady toss'. The place just didn't do it for me, which you seem to find hard to accept. The gaff has recieved absolutely tons of PR, through the trade press which is great for them. My argument goes further than the Kitchin, its the whole media celeb on the telly chef thing. Can we put this one to bed now, its more knackering than a service this!!!!!

hey, you started it :laugh:

you don't win friends with salad

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Surely time to take a step back and realise we are having an argument, sorry discussion, about who is the best Michelin starred Chef in Leith, something your could have got astronomical odds on eight years ago when Wisharts had two people in the kitchen, one competent front of house (hi Cecile), and the leftover staff and cutlery from an Italian restaurant, oh and £14 house wine made by somebody’s relative (hopefully not Martin's) - they could do with bringing the latter back I say.

So well done Wisharts for starting it and Tom Kitchin for upping the ante by providing a realistic, and excellent alternative . Can’t wait for Paul Kitching to be up and running, and hope some others see where the bar is now set and go for it, although sadly judging by the message here http://wildsorrelrestaurant.com/ you’ll need to get the talk: trousers ratio right, which is a shame as yet again the food was getting great reviews – pity it appears to have closed before I got a chance to try it.

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  • 2 months later...

I'll be in town for about a week early in March. There's lots of great info in this thread (love the pictures of Eddie's), but a lot of it is rather dated, with the most recent discussion revolving around Mr. Wishart.

I wonder whether anyone would like to sound off about their current favorites? Price is not really an issue, and I'll have the run of the city. The high end places are the ones that are easiest to get information on from my remote location, so part of what I was hoping to hear about are your "go to" places, your "everyday" type favorites, where maybe you tend to order the same thing when you go.

All cuisines, all settings are acceptable, 'cause there is nothing I won't eat, though I confess I won't pay to eat vegetarian. About the only thing I believe I will do for certain at this point is shop at Valvona & Crolla for some goodies. If you think I oughta go somewhere else, please let me know. And how about a good breakfast place?

I plan on doing some drinkin' too....

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I'll be in town for about a week early in March.  There's lots of great info in this thread (love the pictures of Eddie's), but a lot of it is rather dated, with the most recent discussion revolving around Mr. Wishart.

I wonder whether anyone would like to sound off about their current favorites?  Price is not really an issue, and I'll have the run of the city.  The high end places are the ones that are easiest to get information on from my remote location, so part of what I was hoping to hear about are your "go to" places, your "everyday" type favorites, where maybe you tend to order the same thing when you go.

All cuisines, all settings are acceptable, 'cause there is nothing I won't eat, though I confess I won't pay to eat vegetarian.  About the only thing I believe I will do for certain at this point is shop at Valvona & Crolla for some goodies.  If you think I oughta go somewhere else, please let me know.  And how about a good breakfast place?

I plan on doing some drinkin' too....

We spent a few days in Edinburgh just before new year, maybe not the best time to visit as the city was full of Hogmanay revellers. The ones we tried are as follows:

Valvona & Crolla's "Vincaffe" which is upstairs in their Multrees Walk outlet, is pretty good, it serves modern Italian food at a reasonable price. I thought the wine list was pretty good value. We wanted pizza but they had run out of dough, but the other dishes on the menu were fine, although neither of us can really remember the individual dishes. They have a few other outlets across town, we had a coffee in the Jenner's food hall (run by V&C) which was unremarkable and dissapointing give the hype over the brand. The food hall lokked OK, but mostly the usual suspects in terms of product (we didn't go to the original shop though).

The "Grain Store" near Grassmarket, serves modern food in an old world loft. We couldn't get in for dinner but popped in for their £13 set lunch. I had a really good black pudding starter followed by excellent pheasant. I wish we had made it to dinner there as it had been recommended to us by a number of people. The restaurant is verging on a tourist destination but the cooking was excellent and for the price a real bargain.

"Dubh Prais", is a little restaurant, in a cellar on the royal mile (opposite the SAS hotel), we had NYE here and the food was very good. We had been given this tip by some regular visitors who return to it year after year. It served an excellent modern take on serving haggis (it came with a sauce but I can't recall the details) and some very well cooked main courses. Even though it is on the Royal Mile I believe it is still overlooked by the tourist hordes. I would love to head back for a normal dinner.

Martin Wishart, in Leith, is really at the top end of Edinburgh dining and is really superb. Try to get into it for lunch which IMO is a bargain @ £22.5 for three courses (although watch the wine list). Our meal here was superb and I would head back when I am next in Edinburgh. I can't compare it to The Kitchin as it was closed during our visit, but if The Kitchin is close in standard it will be worth a trip. Also worth noting another Edinburgh restaurant earned a Michelin star this month - The Plumed Horse also in Leith - I have read no reports on it though.

We also had a quick drink in the "Dome" which is an old bank - it is very glamourous (or at least was at Christmas) but normal pub prices. They had a couple of dining choices in different room, the food looked basic but at a fair price, the setting is very nice - old and clubby.

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I wonder whether anyone would like to sound off about their current favorites? 

Sure! Great everyday spots that I cross town for include Hanedan, a Turkish restaurant on the southside of town. We invariably eat mezze and then grilled things. Cheap and lovely. Also Sushiya - a tiny but popular Japanese place near Haymarket station. I always hesitate to recommend sushi although I always have it, as my experience of non-Scottish sushi is quite limited, but even if you wanted to order tempura, noodles and the eggplant dish (my favourite) it's just a great place with a clear plan that knows what it's doing. Bella Mbriana is a really good Italian in the more modern "short menu" style. (As opposed to the 40 pasta/ 40 pizza style still popular in Edinburgh.)

The Dogs, last mentioned in the spring I think on this thread, seems to be going from strength to strength. Still stupendously cheap and our last meal there was really exceptionally good. Toad in the Hole is sometimes on, it's smashing. Lemon posset is always on - its magic too. Some people find the high concept service from the owner aggravating, but I'm not one of them. I'm chilled that way.

I'm lucky in my locals in Stockbridge - I might well cross town for La Concha, a smaller owner-in-the-kitchen sort of Italian, and for Bell's Diner a venerable hamburger place with delicious fried onions. The first time I ordered them as a small child I was disappointed that they weren't onion rings, but I've been eating them ever since.

Breakfast - Roseleaf in Leith for sunday morning waffles; Kilimanjaro on Nicolson Street (possibly Clerk Street) for coffee and every choice of breakfast roll filling, including potato scone; two branches of Urban Angel for porridge.

I don't think you should go hungry,

Catherine

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We spent a few days in Edinburgh just before new year, maybe not the best time to visit as the city was full of Hogmanay revellers. The ones we tried are as follows:

Valvona & Crolla's "Vincaffe" which is upstairs in their Multrees Walk outlet, is pretty good, it serves modern Italian food at a reasonable price. I thought the wine list was pretty good value. We wanted pizza but they had run out of dough, but the other dishes on the menu were fine, although neither of us can really remember the individual dishes. They have a few other outlets across town, we had a coffee in the Jenner's food hall (run by V&C) which was unremarkable and dissapointing give the hype over the brand. The food hall lokked OK, but mostly the usual suspects in terms of product (we didn't go to the original shop though).

The "Grain Store" near Grassmarket, serves modern food in an old world loft. We couldn't get in for dinner but popped in for their £13 set lunch. I had a really good black pudding starter followed by excellent pheasant. I wish we had made it to dinner there as it had been recommended to us by a number of people. The restaurant is verging on a tourist destination but the cooking was excellent and for the price a real bargain.

"Dubh Prais", is a little restaurant, in a cellar on the royal mile (opposite the SAS hotel), we had NYE here and the food was very good. We had been given this tip by some regular visitors who return to it year after year. It served an excellent modern take on serving haggis (it came with a sauce but I can't recall the details) and some very well cooked main courses. Even though it is on the Royal Mile I believe it is still overlooked by the tourist hordes. I would love to head back for a normal dinner.

Martin Wishart, in Leith, is really at the top end of Edinburgh dining and is really superb. Try to get into it for lunch which IMO is a bargain @ £22.5 for three courses (although watch the wine list). Our meal here was superb and I would head back when I am next in Edinburgh. I can't compare it to The Kitchin as it was closed during our visit, but if The Kitchin is close in standard it will be worth a trip. Also worth noting another Edinburgh restaurant earned a Michelin star this month - The Plumed Horse also in Leith - I have read no reports on it though.

We also had a quick drink in the "Dome" which is an old bank - it is very glamourous (or at least was at Christmas) but normal pub prices. They had a couple of dining choices in different room, the food looked basic but at a fair price, the setting is very nice - old and clubby.

Thanks for the input, Phil. I'm hoping places won't be as busy in March as they are during Hogmanay! I've read mixed reviews on the various V&C operations, but the market will have some items that I can't get over here in the states so it'll take on the roll of candy store to my kid. If there's a better place than that to go, I'd like to hear about it.

I haven't come across Dubh Prais, so thanks for that one. I plan on trying Wisharts for lunch -- it'll just be me and that will make it easier. And the Dome I've read about and will stop in for a drink and maybe some bar food depending on the timing.

Appreciate your response!

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I wonder whether anyone would like to sound off about their current favorites? 

Sure! Great everyday spots that I cross town for include Hanedan, a Turkish restaurant on the southside of town. We invariably eat mezze and then grilled things. Cheap and lovely. Also Sushiya - a tiny but popular Japanese place near Haymarket station. I always hesitate to recommend sushi although I always have it, as my experience of non-Scottish sushi is quite limited, but even if you wanted to order tempura, noodles and the eggplant dish (my favourite) it's just a great place with a clear plan that knows what it's doing. Bella Mbriana is a really good Italian in the more modern "short menu" style. (As opposed to the 40 pasta/ 40 pizza style still popular in Edinburgh.)

The Dogs, last mentioned in the spring I think on this thread, seems to be going from strength to strength. Still stupendously cheap and our last meal there was really exceptionally good. Toad in the Hole is sometimes on, it's smashing. Lemon posset is always on - its magic too. Some people find the high concept service from the owner aggravating, but I'm not one of them. I'm chilled that way.

I'm lucky in my locals in Stockbridge - I might well cross town for La Concha, a smaller owner-in-the-kitchen sort of Italian, and for Bell's Diner a venerable hamburger place with delicious fried onions. The first time I ordered them as a small child I was disappointed that they weren't onion rings, but I've been eating them ever since.

Breakfast - Roseleaf in Leith for sunday morning waffles; Kilimanjaro on Nicolson Street (possibly Clerk Street) for coffee and every choice of breakfast roll filling, including potato scone; two branches of Urban Angel for porridge.

I don't think you should go hungry,

Catherine

Oh, I have no intention of being hungry one single moment, Catherine. I live out in the boonies so it is a significant occasion when I get to spend a length of time having the run of a town with a bunch of restaurants in all styles and cuisines. I'm on a diet now, and intend to arrive in loose trousers, and to depart with my belt buckled in previously unutilized beltholes.

I was wondering about sushi. I enjoy it and was hoping there would be some good places, but haven't really come across much during my research. Is there a sushi scene?

The first three places you mention are new to me. I want to do some turk and some indian. The dogs I've read about quite a bit it seems, so thanks for mentioning them.

Two things I should specifically mention, though earmarking me a tourist which I most certainly am, I must try haggis and the full scottish breakfast. so any places that would be best for experiencing either would also be appreciated.

Thanks again!

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I was wondering about sushi.  I enjoy it and was hoping there would be some good places, but haven't really come across much during my research.  Is there a sushi scene?

. . .

Two things I should specifically mention, though earmarking me a tourist which I most certainly am, I must try haggis and the full scottish breakfast. so any places that would be best for experiencing either would also be appreciated.

Thanks again!

Well, I wouldn't call it exactly a scene, but if you check out the Far East section on the website for the List magazine's eating and drinking guide, you'll see that there are a number of restaurants offering sushi - some as part of a more multi-cultural overall set-up. It might have constituted a scene when Yo! Sushi were here with their conveyor belt, but that didn't last.

Not being a tourist myself, I'm struggling to think of the best places for haggis and for fried breakfast, although the good news is that you should be able to kill both birds with the one stone, as haggis ought to appear in a full Scottish.

C

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I was wondering about sushi.  I enjoy it and was hoping there would be some good places, but haven't really come across much during my research.  Is there a sushi scene?

. . .

Two things I should specifically mention, though earmarking me a tourist which I most certainly am, I must try haggis and the full scottish breakfast. so any places that would be best for experiencing either would also be appreciated.

Thanks again!

Well, I wouldn't call it exactly a scene, but if you check out the Far East section on the website for the List magazine's eating and drinking guide, you'll see that there are a number of restaurants offering sushi - some as part of a more multi-cultural overall set-up. It might have constituted a scene when Yo! Sushi were here with their conveyor belt, but that didn't last.

Not being a tourist myself, I'm struggling to think of the best places for haggis and for fried breakfast, although the good news is that you should be able to kill both birds with the one stone, as haggis ought to appear in a full Scottish.

C

Would The List's Dining Guide be a good investment when I arrive? And I don't know what "sushi scene" means anyway. I guess what I meant was that I'd seen plenty of references to places that did sushi, but no place that was lauded for it or highly recommended on that basis.

And you're right, but only trying haggis at breakfast would mean no neeps and tatties with it. I know, full tourist thing, but then I can check it off the list and not worry about it ever again.

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Hi--

The List guide is good if you want an overview of the restaurants in the town (although I should add that quite a few places have closed down in the past year--the Jamaican restaurant Coyaba, Fenwicks, Jacques near Tollcross etc) but I wouldn't rely too much on its reviews. It just doesn't seem particularly critical of anything much.

I went to The Dogs again last Friday and, after a shaky start with a rather peremptory waitress, we had a great and, for Edinburgh, astonishingly good value meal. I had very good lamb's heart stuffed with prunes and the wife and I shared an unctuous (and, because of its size, unfinishable) platter of pork belly and tomatoey butter beans. Very few places in the town are doing this kind of cooking and at this price. I can see why some people get annoyed with David Ramsden's style of service, but he's never been anything but pleasant to us.

I second Hanedan. Great food, lovely smiley service. It's also BYOB.

I know I'm in the minority on this, but Valvona and Crolla's restaurants--meh. On the other hand, Centotre, on George Street, I do like. Rather erratic service, though.

Have you considered La Garrigue on Jeffrey Street for things like cassoulet? Just the ticket now that the Russian snow is coming!

Is the Cafe Royal mentioned on the thread? I can't remember. Good seafood, great ambiance.

Ian

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Hi--

The List guide is good if you want an overview of the restaurants in the town (although I should add that quite a few places have closed down in the past year--the Jamaican restaurant Coyaba, Fenwicks, Jacques near Tollcross etc) but I wouldn't rely too much on its reviews. It just doesn't seem particularly critical of anything much.

I went to The Dogs again last Friday and, after a shaky start with a rather peremptory waitress, we had a great and, for Edinburgh, astonishingly good value meal. I had very good lamb's heart stuffed with prunes and the wife and I shared an unctuous (and, because of its size, unfinishable) platter of pork belly and tomatoey butter beans. Very few places in the town are doing this kind of cooking and at this price. I can see why some people get annoyed with David Ramsden's style of service, but he's never been anything but pleasant to us.

I second Hanedan. Great food, lovely smiley service. It's also BYOB.

I know I'm in the minority on this, but Valvona and Crolla's restaurants--meh. On the other hand, Centotre, on George Street, I do like. Rather erratic service, though.

Have you considered La Garrigue on Jeffrey Street for things like cassoulet? Just the ticket now that the Russian snow is coming!

Is the Cafe Royal mentioned on the thread? I can't remember. Good seafood, great ambiance.

Ian

Hanedan is firmly on the list, thank you. The dogs menu looks great, so I'm pretty sure it's also a go. Though, I'm not sure what "David Ramsden's style of service" means?

Your last three suggestions I don't believe I've come across, so I'll look them up. Thanks!

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All the list reviews are available onlineonline.They are just starting to review for 2009.

I would suggest lunch time forays to the Kitchin, the Plumed Horse (both Michelin starred) and a friend of mine's restaurant Redwood, based in Stockbridge. This is Californian food using Scottish ingredients. Annette is a native Californian.

Wedgwood on the Royal Mile is pretty good too.

Hi--

The List guide is good if you want an overview of the restaurants in the town (although I should add that quite a few places have closed down in the past year--the Jamaican restaurant Coyaba, Fenwicks, Jacques near Tollcross etc) but I wouldn't rely too much on its reviews. It just doesn't seem particularly critical of anything much.

I went to The Dogs again last Friday and, after a shaky start with a rather peremptory waitress, we had a great and, for Edinburgh, astonishingly good value meal. I had very good lamb's heart stuffed with prunes and the wife and I shared an unctuous (and, because of its size, unfinishable) platter of pork belly and tomatoey butter beans. Very few places in the town are doing this kind of cooking and at this price. I can see why some people get annoyed with David Ramsden's style of service, but he's never been anything but pleasant to us.

I second Hanedan. Great food, lovely smiley service. It's also BYOB.

I know I'm in the minority on this, but Valvona and Crolla's restaurants--meh. On the other hand, Centotre, on George Street, I do like. Rather erratic service, though.

Have you considered La Garrigue on Jeffrey Street for things like cassoulet? Just the ticket now that the Russian snow is coming!

Is the Cafe Royal mentioned on the thread? I can't remember. Good seafood, great ambiance.

Ian

Hanedan is firmly on the list, thank you. The dogs menu looks great, so I'm pretty sure it's also a go. Though, I'm not sure what "David Ramsden's style of service" means?

Your last three suggestions I don't believe I've come across, so I'll look them up. Thanks!

Danielle Ellis

Edinburgh Scotland

www.edinburghfoody.com

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All the list reviews are available onlineonline.They are just starting to review for 2009.

I would suggest lunch time forays to the Kitchin, the Plumed Horse (both Michelin starred) and a friend of mine's restaurant Redwood, based in Stockbridge. This is Californian food using Scottish ingredients. Annette is a native Californian.

Do I need to book for lunch at the starred venues?

Edited by Dignan (log)
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Don't waste your time going to the Plummed Horse. F..k knows how the place got a star. I would recommend you look at Wisharts and No 1, although I don't think No 1 is open for lunch.

Okay, that's me warned about the Plummed Horse. Thanks!

ETA: Would you say bookings are a necessity for the likes of Wishart's and/or Kitchin at lunch?

Edited by Dignan (log)
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How do you pronounce "Deuchars"?

Easily after 4 or 5 of them...!

I think I went for "Duke argh's" - it seemed to work.

Close enough. I've always gone with "Duke-urs".

Failing that, you can usually get it by just asking for "the IPA" and giving a nod or a quick point towards the appropriate tap/pump.

PS

Edinburgh

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