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I accept your point Dellis453, and I am more than happy to have my one negative experience balanced by the opinion of one who has been there many times. Personally for me though, life is too short to give some places a second go, and "Thai Me Up" falls into that category for me. But then, I do insist on using chopsticks, so perhaps my comments should be taken with a grain of msg! (Just joking... I don't want to upset anyone!)

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Useful as the List is, it is hardly the most critical paper. I have yet to see a bad review yet and some of places in it should be razed and salted.

Grr agree!! Booked 'The New Bell' on the basis of the reviews, and because it was close to a show venue. Set menu was £23, just £1 less than at Kensington Place back home (which is now superb once more) and they have the cheek to put on 4 options for which you have to pay extra! Food was nothing to write home about and we got sniffed at for ordering the house white. Decor was what you'd expect from above a pub.

Atrium, on the other hand, was superb, despite them having to 'play safe' as the maitre d' put it for the Festival crowds. Anyone else had the 'cheese wine'?? :biggrin:

Sarah

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  • 2 months later...

friends and I had a v good dinner at Santini's in Festival Square, just by the Sheraton hotel. The air dried ham and cheese which accompanied the bread at our table was particularly good. My starters were venetian spiced scallops on pork belly (sliced wafer-thin and fried to a crisp) and cauliflower puree. Scallops were tender and succulent, and overall a very delicious mouthful. Mains of chicken with pesto risotto and zucchini and tomatoes also hit the spot as did my chocolate dessert. We were in the main restaurant - very glamourous looking room (although some of the girls were left facing a very peculiar shot f a bikini-clad woman on the kitchen wall ...)

Lunches were good too - at the old favourites of Cafe Florentin and the Fruitmarket Gallery.

All in all, a very good weekend of eating ..

Yin

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  • 2 years later...

On Friday night we went to The Dogs, David Ramsden's new "traditional restaurant", which has taken over the Tijuana Yacht Club's old beat on Hanover Street. Mr Ramsden's a bit of a legend on the Edinburgh restaurant scene, and lately I've been having trouble keeping up with the many pies he's got his fingers in. (Over the past few months, I've read he was general manager of The Apartment and its sister restaurant The Outsider; I saw he had a new restaurant called Iris in the old Monster Mash location on Thistle Street; and now this.)

In contrast to one of Mr Ramsden's previous ventures, the late lamented Rogue, The Dogs isn't crisp tablecloths and nice glassware with a luxurious, laid-back vibe. It's mismatched chairs, bare tables dotted arbitrarily about the (smallish) room and paper-napkined wrapped cutlery plonked down in front of you in your water glass. It's busy and, at times, a bit frenetic. The menu is cheap cuts of meat and offal-heavy, with very few items over a tenner; the long-ish wine list has only a couple of bottles over the £20 mark. Theoretically, a couple could eat three courses with a bottle of wine and get out for less than fifty bananas.

The question is: would you want to? On the strength of my meal, I'd say yes. My toothsome ham hock terrine (£4.50) was well matched with some punchy piccalilli, and my main of melt-in-the-mouth braised ox cheeks and horseradish mash (£8.25) was cut perfectly with some pickled walnuts. Others in our party didn't fare so well, however. The wife said that her breast of lamb, though very nice, really needed some kind of condiment, and we felt that the beef rib steak (the most expensive dish on the menu at £19.50) was a wee bit lacking in meat. As for desserts, the lemon posset (£2.50) was declared a winner, while at £4.25 (I think) my rhubarb crumble wasn't really a patch on what I might be able to rustle up of an evening. The service, led by Ramsden himself, was certainly efficient, if somewhat stymied by the obstacle course of oddly angled tables and thrust-out chairs with coats trailing behind them.

The Dogs has only opened, so the kitchen might still be finding its feet. With a bit of tweaking, however, and at these prices, it could be a real winner. Anyway, David Ramsden doesn't need my recommendation: he was turning away people in droves on Friday night.

Spanky

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  • 2 months later...

i'm off in a few weeks for the festival and would like any recent suggestions on dinner for saturday evening.

so far oloroso and kitchin seem interesting; however neither convinces me wholeheartedly. what i do like about kitchin (from the menu) is the lean towards scottish produce...any true edinburgh instiutions which are worht a visit?

there will be 6/7 of us and we want to have one good dinner that week-end.

thanks!

-che

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i'm off in a few weeks for the festival and would like any recent suggestions on dinner for saturday evening.

so far oloroso and kitchin seem interesting; however neither convinces me wholeheartedly. what i do like about kitchin (from the menu) is the lean towards scottish produce...any true edinburgh instiutions which are worht a visit?

there will be 6/7 of us and we want to have one good dinner that week-end.

thanks!

-che

Just back from a few days in Edinburgh and had the tasting menu at The Kitchin. It actually turned out to be one of the best meals I have had in a long time. Absolutely spot on in produce and cooking skill. Service flawless and wine matching unbelievable. One of the dishes really blew me away, it was 'Sea Urchin from the East Neuk of Fife served as a soup with razor fish and clams', the soup being served in the shell of the urchin with the razor clam shell as the spoon: truly sublime.

I would say book The Kitchin now Che as during the festival things will be pretty booked up. I will write a full review soon.

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The Kitchin is superb - I had the tasting menu with wines there a couple of months ago and it was probably the best meal I've had in Edinburgh. Local produce, expertly cooked, nicely presented, good wine choices.

Oloroso is highly over-rated in my book - it's okay, but absolutely not anything special. Tony Singh's other place, Roti, is much more interesting - indian cuisine at a high quality restaurant standard.

Number One at the Balmoral is reliably good but not, to my mind, spectacular.

PS

Edinburgh

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  • 3 weeks later...

Just come back from a few days away staying at friends just outside Edinburgh. Didn't get any where high end, but a couple of places worth mentioning.

Monday evening we went to Queens Spice indian in South Queensferry, a very good friendly indian. I have been before on previous trips, always good. We had a drink afterwards next door in Orocco Pier, a trendy bar/hotel with a terrace that gives you a excellent view of the two forth bridges.

Tuesday, had lunch in the Ship Inn in Elie, accross the water in Fife. The Fife coast is lovely, with lots of pretty fishing villages. Lunch was good, I would not say its a 'Gastropub', but a pub that serves good food, if that makes sense??

In the evening I met up with my cousin and his girlfriend in town and had a meal at Montheiths, on the high street. I had a very tasty pork belly dish and a crumble for afters (not very hot?) A fair priced meal, quirky interiors, I would go back. I did not plan it well, meal on the high street in the middle of the festival! Doh, place was packed!

Weds went into town, lunch was had at the dogs, on hanover street. It was excellent, cheapest lunch I've had in Edinburgh. Bread, 2 mains, 2 drinks for me, 1 glass of wine, 1 1/2 giraffe of wine £26. The cooking is very 'homey' I had a sort of sausauge casarole, very tasty, can't remember what the other had? Total blank....will edit if I remember, full of a cold at mo. The Dogs is really good value, the staff were really friendly too.

Weds evening we went to Norton House, near the airport as my friends had a voucher to use. Ate in the brasserie. Smart place, I had a chicory salad with mozerella and parma ham (which was brittle??) that was a bit boring, followed by salmon with cous cous, very pleasant. Dessert was treacle tart. Bill came to £200 for 4 of us, so not cheap, Norton House has a fine dining restaurant too, I saw it had 3 rosettes, no main under £20. But its quite corporate, as its close to the airport, lots of air stewards/pilots, lots of blokes in suits with expense accounts. We had good evening though.

Then on the way home we passed though Dumfries and Annan, stopped in the local hotel in annan, not worth egulleting! But it filled a hole. But I am keen to try the Linen Room in Dumfries, bit far to go for lunch for me, but what the hell!

um, so there you go. I'm off to drown myself in Lemsip.

Edited by spanielking (log)
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Anyone heard anything about Paul Kitching and his missus (ex Juniper)?

They are looking for a site in Edinburgh apparently.

The latest report online appears to be this March piece from caterersearch:

"Michelin-starred chef Paul Kitching is to launch a new venture in Edinburgh after his departure from his current restaurant Juniper in Altrincham, Greater Manchester.

Kitching and partner Katie O’Brien, who are leaving Juniper after 12 years, told the Manchester Evening News they plan to open a hotel-restaurant venture in the Scottish capital and gain a second Michelin star.

Backed by a private investor, the venture will be called Hotel Angela, after Kitching’s mother who passed away five years ago.

The couple are currently looking at three possible sites in Edinburgh’s Georgian New Town and plan to launch a six to eight bedroom property with a 35-cover restaurant serving classic food."

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Anyone heard anything about Paul Kitching and his missus (ex Juniper)?

They are looking for a site in Edinburgh apparently.

The couple are currently looking at three possible sites in Edinburgh’s Georgian New Town and plan to launch a six to eight bedroom property with a 35-cover restaurant serving classic food."

Pretty sure they're still living in Manc. They;re in the local pubs often enough.

It no longer exists, but it was lovely.

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"Anyone heard anything about Paul Kitching and his missus (ex Juniper)?"

"Pretty sure they're still living in Manc. They;re in the local pubs often enough."

No doubt you have seen them entering such establishments on the way to your Bible meetings Bertie. :smile:

Edited by Bapi (log)
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  • 1 month later...
Location of Paul Kitching's new restaurant has now been confirmed as No 3, Royal Terrace.

An interesting location, a couple of doors down from an office I set up ten years ago. And ironically it's but a few yards from the old Bronx Diner, arguably the worst eating establishment I've ever had the displeasure of being in, thankfully now closed.

It will be most welcome for residents of the Glasshouse hotel, where there is nowhere to dine in the evening, except in chain restaurant such as Pizza Hut of the adjacent Omni Centre cinema multiplex.

Cheers, Howard

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  • 1 month later...

Certainly they are 'the' places, along side Number 1 at the balmoral, all * places. Also look at Wild Sorrell, other half went there to check it out, its in the old town. Is the home of the chef who got busted for beefing up his CV a bit! I was told it was very good though. Also the Atrium is good, and for something a bit different (and a bit out of town) the Glasshouse at Eskmills.

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We are heading to Edinburgh and wanted to go to The Kitchin but it is closed. Any recommendations for the next best? Is it Martin Wishart?

Bad luck - we had an excellent meal at The Kitchin last Friday.

As it happens we had hoped to go to Martin Wishart ourselves, but we left it too late to book. Although we haven't been there ourselves, Martin Wishart is definitely still on our "must visit" list, so if you can I would suggest booking there.

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Martin Wisharts gets the nod everytime, followed by No 1. I honesty cannot see the fasination of the Kitchin. Had an absolutely terrible experience there earlier in the year. The worst of it was my partners awful lamb, which had been murdered and the puddings, well I wish I taken my own along! We were so peed off with the place, that we stomped our way back to our hotel, in the rain, which was three miles away. In my opinion, Kitchin is completely overhyped and overated. Is it a case nowadays that the more media hype a place gets, then the better it must be? Why do so many people buy into this nonsense? Im sure I will be in the minority here but frankly if a meal is bad, then its bad, regardless of the pr.

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Martin Wisharts gets the nod everytime, followed by No 1. I honesty cannot see the fasination of the Kitchin. Had an absolutely terrible experience there earlier in the year. The worst of it was my partners awful lamb, which had been murdered and the puddings, well I wish I taken my own along! We were so peed off with the place, that we stomped our way back to our hotel, in the rain, which was three miles away. In my opinion, Kitchin is completely overhyped and overated. Is it a case nowadays that the more media hype a place gets, then the better it must be? Why do so many people buy into this nonsense? Im sure I will be in the minority here but frankly if a meal is bad, then its bad, regardless of the pr.

but one bad meal (in your opinion) doesn't necessarily make it a bad restaurant.

(no axe to grind, never been, thought about it and prob will at some point)

you don't win friends with salad

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Did'nt ever say it was a 'bad' restaurant. My point was that somehow because of the hype it gets, its now THE place to be, over very geniue and class establishments like Wisharts. I've been to both. Wisharts was so good that following a dinner there, went back for lunch the next day. How many places can you say that about. At the minute, its almost like 'whats in fashion this season' when it comes to restaurants and food. Maybe Im old fashioned or naive but its reasurring to know that when you go to the likes of Wisharts, the chef is 9 times out of ten actually cooking and he has resisted the temptation to sell his soul to the media.

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Maybe Im old fashioned or naive but its reasurring to know that when you go to the likes of Wisharts, the chef is 9 times out of ten actually cooking and he has resisted the temptation to sell his soul to the media.

The evening we were at Kitchin the chef was busy in the kitchen (there's a window into the kitchen so we could watch what was happening). I have no idea whether this was an atypical evening.

gallery_6638_1334_67110.jpg

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Thanks for all the advice. We have booked Martin Wishart for a long, long lunch - I assume they do full ALC and Tasting, we will check. Interestingly dinner was already full 6 weeks in advance (and no, not for NYE).

Next question, recommendations please, for good but inexpensive meals. A good curry (Roti?), a steak (The Grain Store?), and decent pubs (good beer).

We are also stopping at the Star Inn in North Yorks on the way up so don't need another top feed.

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Maybe Im old fashioned or naive but its reasurring to know that when you go to the likes of Wisharts, the chef is 9 times out of ten actually cooking and he has resisted the temptation to sell his soul to the media.

The evening we were at Kitchin the chef was busy in the kitchen (there's a window into the kitchen so we could watch what was happening). I have no idea whether this was an atypical evening.

I've been to the Kitchin three times now - One Friday dinner, two midweek lunches. On each occasion I and my fellow diner had an excellent meal (better, in my opinion, than the several - upwards of seven - meals I have enjoyed at Number One at The Balmoral, a restaurant that I rate). And on each occasion Tom Kitchin was in the kitchen.

Still, that's not to say that every meal and diner's experience is going to be faultless. Each to their own. Out of interest, how was the lamb murdered? I had one of the best pieces of lamb I've tasted in a long time at The Kitchin. The puddings were pretty tasty as well.

PS

Edinburgh

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