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Ramen Recipes


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Is that. . .spaghetti in there?

Yeah, I spent hours making the broth then put in spaghetti.

Noodles.jpg

No, you put hours into making the broth and then put in udon. :laugh:

Ramen noodles, if available, are almost always in the refrigerated section. The only dried ramen noodles I've seen are instant ramen ones.

Still, the broth looks good, and that's the important part.

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Powerplantop: Your tonkotsu ramen looks delicious, not at all greasy like many tokotsu ramen served at ramen shops in Japan.

One thing I want to point out is that the noodles in your photo are not ramen noodles but udon noodles. Do you prefer udon to ramen noodles?

It takes a lot of effort to get most of the grease out of the broth. I am sure that is just is not economical for most ramen shops to do that.

I am curently on a project in Memphis, TN. And I have not been able to find a very good market for Japanese food. I have found an ok one but not a good one. If anyone knows of a good Japanese market in Memphis please pass along.

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Try Chinese grocery stores. Ramen (the noodles) are essentially Chinese, anyway. Just remember they're in the refrigerated section. It would be a shame to go through all that work only to use the wrong noodle again (although to me, unless you're a purist, it's more about the broth than the noodle).

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In Kyushu, where tonkotsu ramen originated, many ramen shop serve non-greasy ramen, but in Kanto (Eastern Japan), tonkotsu is somewhat misunderstood, and in some shops, they serve very greasy ramen with seabura (pork back fat) sprinkled on them, like these.

I understand that young people tend to go for greasy foods, but these very greasy ramen are simply not for me.

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It takes a lot of effort to get most of the grease out of the broth. I am sure that is just is not economical for most ramen shops to do that.

Here's a trick... if you're making your broth in advance, refrigerating it overnight makes all the fat/grease rise to the top and solidify, making it easy to just slide it off.

Cheryl

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It takes a lot of effort to get most of the grease out of the broth. I am sure that is just is not economical for most ramen shops to do that.

Here's a trick... if you're making your broth in advance, refrigerating it overnight makes all the fat/grease rise to the top and solidify, making it easy to just slide it off.

That is what I would normally do but this broth had so much gelatin in it that the fat was stuck. You could see it but scraping it off pulled a lot of the broth with it.

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In Kyushu, where tonkotsu ramen originated, many ramen shop serve non-greasy ramen, but in Kanto (Eastern Japan), tonkotsu is somewhat misunderstood, and in some shops, they serve very greasy ramen with seabura (pork back fat) sprinkled on them, like these.

I understand that young people tend to go for greasy foods, but these very greasy ramen are simply not for me.

I was introduced to Ramen in Yokosuka so the fat back thing to me is just wrong. I do like a small sheen of fat but not blobs. Perhaps after a night of drinking chu-hi's then I might go for it..

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