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Ramen Recipes


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Thank you for your help. I do appreciate it and will check out the Ramen thread. I hope someday I can return the favour by offering a Japanese recipe from one of my books or other help, instead of asking so many questions!

I'm still very much in the learning stage for this cuisine, so unfortunately I have many more questions than answers at the moment :)

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  • 10 months later...

By far, my favorite type of ramen broth is Tonkotsu, which originates from Nagata which is in the south of Japan and is also served in other specialty ramen shops thoughout the country. Click for Flickr photo

This Site has a basic recipe, but I've heard that making real Tonkotsu broth is an entire day affair.

Does anyone have any real, tried and true method for making this stuff? And what kind of pork bones do you need?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Onigiri, as I understand, Tonkotsu (spelled that way, as opposed to Tonkatsu, which is a type of fried pork cutlet) broth is a very labor intensive broth to make, as it requires simmering pork bones overnight for like 8-12 hours. Its a white, silky broth with a very strong savory pork flavor, very different from other types of broth used for Ramen soups.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Thank Jason for the correction. I wonder if it is similar to pho broth or thai beef broth used for noodle soup. Both if made traditionally can be labor intensive and require a long simmer time. I know in my family we had an aunt who specialized in making beef broth for noodles. It took pretty much all day and the only thing I remember that was in it beside huge bones was pineapple of all things.

I'll be interested to see what people have to say about japanese ramen broths.

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Tonkotsu, which originates from Nagata in the south of the country on Kyushu island

Nagata? You mean Kurume? Tonkotsu ramen is said to originate in Kurume, Fukuoka prefecture.

Does anyone have any real, tried and true method for making this stuff?

I don't think there are such serious ramen lovers in the Japan Forum. Did you contact BON for any information?

And what kind of pork bones do you need?

Thighbone, often referred to as genkotsu (fist) in Japanese because the joint resembles a human fist, and other bones like backbone.

Here's a recipe IN JAPANESE: http://www.mendo.jp/origin/040612/soup.html

Use this site to translate the webpage into English:

http://www.excite.co.jp/world/english/web/

Good luck, Jason!

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There is a reason why instant ramen is so popular, the real stuff it just too damn difficult! :biggrin: Even the people I know who are serious ramen lovers wouldn't even think of making their own. Of course in Japan you can also walk down to any corner and get a decent bowl of tonkotsu ramen any time you want to.

Tonkotsu is by far my favorite as well, if you do find a good recipe please share it.

It will probably take a lot longer than just one day though, the recipe Hiroyuki linked to takes three days...

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Nagata? You mean Kurume? Tonkotsu ramen is said to originate in Kurume, Fukuoka prefecture.

Interesting, I've spoken to others who claim it to be from Nagata, but then again the two cities arent too far from each other. I've also heard Kyushu, where Fukuoka is. It doesn't really matter though, because its eaten throughout Japan in the major cities, including Tokyo, is it not?

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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In Japan, Sapporo, Kitakata, and Hakata Ramens are said to be the San Dai (Three Major) Ramens. Hakata Ramen is one of Kyushu ramens, which are said to originate from Kurume Ramen.

Links to some websites you may find interesing:

http://www3.city.kurume.fukuoka.jp/e-kurum...joy/index-e.htm

http://r.gnavi.co.jp/fl/en/a384118/

its eaten throughout Japan in the major cities, including Tokyo, is it not?

Yes, it is. I'm not sure, but I think it's eaten in small towns as well.

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Anyone want to attempt to translate this to English? I think making homemade Tonkotsu broth is a worthy endeavor, if we can get a procedure locked down.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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My husband used to work in a ramen shop, and was quite proud of his broth. But do you think he's ever made ramen from scratch? No way.

In fact I don't know anyone who's ever made ramen broth from scratch at home. But that doesn't mean it's a bad idea. I made pho from scratch last month, which is something I'd never attempt back home. But then, there are plenty of good Vietnamese restaurants in Toronto, and none in Tokyo. So if it's the only way you get to eat something you crave, then it's worth it.

Making tonkotsu broth may be an all day affair, but don't let that put you off- it's the same for any other kind of ramen broth. In fact, I've always assumed tonkotsu was easier, since the broth is supposed to be opaque and boldly flavoured- it's much harder to make a clear, delicate broth. (For this reason, I find it's hard to find really good shio ramen- the simplest broth is the most difficult.)

Each shop has its own recipe, with quite a lot of variation. So don't feel you have to stick exactly to the recipe- improvise and substitute if you need to. And remember that tonkotsu usually has more "condiments" than other types of ramen- stuff like minced garlic, chili paste, mentaiko, benishoga, and tanaka pickles can be ordered as toppings or added at the table. So even if your broth doesn't turn out perfectly, you can do a lot to fix it in the bowl.

Good luck, really looking forward to seeing the results!

My eGullet foodblog: Spring in Tokyo

My regular blog: Blue Lotus

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Yes, this is an all day affair. Kick back with a six pack and turn on your favorite sport channel (In my case, Fox NFL). I had my butcher saved all the pork neck bone and chopped into a small chunks. I usually boil a pot of salted water and quickly blanch the neck bones to "wash" out the blood and other protein before transferring it to a cold pot of water. Once the broth start boiling in bubbles, turn the down the fire to medium and let it boil for another hour before lower the fire to the lowest for 2 hours. To flavor the broth, I like hondashi and kelp. And perhaps some white sesame seed. Oh don't forget the salt and white pepper.

Azianbrewer

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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Yes, this is an all day affair.  Kick back with a six pack and turn on your favorite sport channel (In my case, Fox NFL).  I had my butcher saved all the pork neck bone and chopped into a small chunks.  I usually boil a pot of salted water and quickly blanch the neck bones to "wash" out the blood and other protein before transferring it to a cold pot of water.  Once the broth start boiling in bubbles, turn the down the fire to medium and let it boil for another hour before lower the fire to the lowest for 2 hours.  To flavor the broth, I like hondashi and kelp.  And perhaps some white sesame seed.  Oh don't forget the salt and white pepper.

Azianbrewer

AzianBrewer,

is your broth whitish and milky like tonkotsu soup? If not, would you care to try my recipe once it's completed?

Jason,

my recipe will be based on this one, not the one I previously provided a link to. Still working on it.

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Yes, this is an all day affair.  Kick back with a six pack and turn on your favorite sport channel (In my case, Fox NFL).  I had my butcher saved all the pork neck bone and chopped into a small chunks.  I usually boil a pot of salted water and quickly blanch the neck bones to "wash" out the blood and other protein before transferring it to a cold pot of water.  Once the broth start boiling in bubbles, turn the down the fire to medium and let it boil for another hour before lower the fire to the lowest for 2 hours.  To flavor the broth, I like hondashi and kelp.  And perhaps some white sesame seed.  Oh don't forget the salt and white pepper.

Azianbrewer

AzianBrewer,

is your broth whitish and milky like tonkotsu soup? If not, would you care to try my recipe once it's completed?

Jason,

my recipe will be based on this one, not the one I previously provided a link to. Still working on it.

It is pretty much like the Korean's Seolleongtang except I used pork bone and they used beef bone. I sure will give your recipe a try.

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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I've never tried to make tonkotsu ramen, but I always thought the white milky broth was made by keeping the broth at a rolling boil for a key few hours, instead of a simmer. At least that's what I've seen at several tonkotsu ramen shops too. Simmering keeps the soup clear.

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I've never tried to make tonkotsu ramen, but I always thought the white milky broth was made by keeping the broth at a rolling boil for a key few hours, instead of a simmer.  At least that's what I've seen at several tonkotsu ramen shops too.  Simmering keeps the soup clear.

I am not sure if it is true but the milky color is contributed by throwing the bones at the cold water and boil.

Leave the gun, take the canoli

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I've also heard that it is boiling the stock that gets the pork fat to emulsify in the broth for that cloudy look and rich flavor. How they get the little flecks of pork fat suspended in the broth but not melting seems amazing to me. Good luck. Have you got a source for noodles and mastered the roast pork yet?

In northern CA I get my ramen fix at Ramen Halu.

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Gosh, I'm feeling seriously nerdy. I make ramen broth quite often, but it's mostly a chicken-based broth. Tonkotsu broth is a regional style which has only fairly recently become a national trend - my ramen book (which also contains a recipe for the noodles which I'm happy to say I have no intention of trying out) makes no mention of tonkotsu at all.

I'll be happy to put the chicken broth recipe on this or another thread if anybody wants it - in a few days - this flu has left my eyes a bit sensitive at the moment.

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Oh, Helen, are you feeling better now? お疲れ様でした to your recent blogging! And, thank you for your photos of Kita Kogane and the pickle shops.

This is going to be a lot of fun. Another cook-off? Anyone interested? I have no intention of making tonkotsu ramen from scratch, though!

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I have made it before. I used pork back bones (I ask a butcher who disassembles whole hogs to set them aside for me) covered the bones in water and cooked them in a pressure cooker. This takes much less time and produces a broth that is very good. The key to producing a milky broth is to use bones that have enough gelatin and cook it for a long time at a temperature that allows the liquid to boil. In my expereince this takes about 3 hours. You know it is ready when you walk down the block and you can still smell that very, ahem, distinctive pork smell. Once the liquid has enough body to hold the dissolved fat in suspension you will have that lip smacking broth. After extracting the bones goodness I use kombu to raise the umami quotient (then discard the kombu).

I have experimented with adding niboshi (dried sardies) or katsuobushi with good results.

I usually make a large batch and then reduce the liquid by about half, freeze individual disks of it for making "instant" ramen.

my favorite is tonkotsu broth with miso, chashu, spicy menma, fried green onion, and freshly roasted and suribachi'd sesame seeds. ::drool::

now I need to perfect my soft boiled egg :biggrin:

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I have made it before. I used pork back bones (I ask a butcher who disassembles whole hogs to set them aside for me)  covered the bones in water and cooked them in a pressure cooker. This takes much less time and produces a broth that is very good. The key to producing a milky broth is to use bones that have enough gelatin and cook it for a long time at a temperature that allows the liquid to boil. In my expereince this takes about 3 hours. You know it is ready when you walk down the block and you can still smell that very, ahem, distinctive pork smell. Once the liquid has enough body to hold the dissolved fat in suspension you will have that lip smacking broth. After extracting the bones goodness I use kombu to raise the umami quotient (then discard the kombu).

I have experimented with adding niboshi (dried sardies) or katsuobushi with good results.

I usually make a large batch and then reduce the liquid by about half, freeze individual disks of it for making "instant" ramen.

my favorite is tonkotsu broth with miso, chashu, spicy menma, fried green onion, and freshly roasted and suribachi'd sesame seeds. ::drool::

now I need to perfect my soft boiled egg  :biggrin:

It's good to know we have someone like you. Would you care to share your recipe?

As for me, I changed my mind and decided to present three different recipes with different cooking times (3, 6, and 12 hours).

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