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Mayonnaise Kitchen


KNorthrup
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Today, I made mayonnaise with my Milser (product name), which is a small-size blender. I must confess this is only the third time that I have ever made mayo with this machine. (I bought it more than twelve years ago.)

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Does anybody know what component makes the Japanese mayo tart? American mayo, off the shelf, is made with soybean oil. I know this because I am allergic, and it is very hard to find a mayonaisse made with something else unless you go to a health food store, or if it's Passover.

What I've noticed is the difference in taste, not just from the soybean oil based mayo, but from the other ones as well. The kosher for Passover mayo is made with cottonseed oil, and it had a different mouthfeel--kinda dry? The Canola oil mayo was very rich, and tasted actually sweeter than what I remember the soybean oil mayo tasting.

Some mayos also have other ingredients added, such as xantham gum, which I suppose is to add to the texture. I'm curious now what the label says is included in the Japanese mayo?

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When you make mayo, Hiroyuki, do you make the tart Japanese-style or the sweet American one?

I just followed the recipe recommended by the manufacturer.

Ingredients of the manufacturer's recipe:

1 egg yolk

2.5 cc salt

5 cc mustard paste (which I didn't add because my daughter (5) doesn't care for mustard)

5 cc sugar

30 cc vinegar

180 cc salad oil

I found the resulting mayo rather sweet. :angry: I like Japanese tart mayo.

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  • 4 months later...

Just a simple question to all of you out there. I was shopping to today and noticed a "yellow cap" Kewpie Mayonnaise. With the "red cap" being the original, what is the yellow cap version? Possibly lower calorie or maybe with mustard?

Thanks!

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Yeah, it was a simple question, and here is an answer:

This new product is called Kewpie Karashi Mayonnaise, and is available in 300-g and 200-g tube.

As the name suggests, it contains karashi (mustard), and goes well with sandwiches, hot dogs, yakisoba, okonomiyaki, and so on, according Kewpie's site.

http://www.kewpie.co.jp/products/index_mayo.html

(Japanese only)

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  • 1 month later...
  • 9 months later...

I keep both Kewpie and Banquet brand mayo. My daughter loves Kewpie on broccoli or asparagus.

The Banquet Brand is a Southern California brand that isn't a major brand. It is much more tangy than Best Foods.

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  • 1 month later...

I can tell you all what makes Kewpie mayo taste different than other mayo's..... MSG.

It is an ingredient in Kewpie, and I find that if I eat too much mayo at one go (hello okonomiyaki) I find myself getting "dry mouth" and sometimes even heart palpitations.

Nowadays a little mayo goes a long way *sigh* but I DO really love the Kewpie brand mayo. It makes me Natsukoshi (Kris, this means reminiscent / something that brings back fond memories, doesn't it ?)

-Rob.

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Nowadays a little mayo goes a long way *sigh*  but I DO really love the Kewpie brand mayo.  It makes me Natsukoshi (Kris, this means reminiscent / something that brings back fond memories, doesn't it ?)

Yes it does. Natsukashii is one of my favorite Japanese words and I wish we had a good equivalent in English.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Nowadays a little mayo goes a long way *sigh*  but I DO really love the Kewpie brand mayo.  It makes me Natsukoshi (Kris, this means reminiscent / something that brings back fond memories, doesn't it ?)

Yes it does. Natsukashii is one of my favorite Japanese words and I wish we had a good equivalent in English.

Does it have a different feeling than the English "nostalgic"?

To keep this vaguely on topic, I will admit that I have yet to ever buy a bottle of Kewpie mayo - something I will remedy this weekend when I again visit/bother my favorite Japanese shopkeepers.

Also, I want one of those マヨマニアTシャツ!!

Jennie

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Nowadays a little mayo goes a long way *sigh*  but I DO really love the Kewpie brand mayo.  It makes me Natsukoshi (Kris, this means reminiscent / something that brings back fond memories, doesn't it ?)

Yes it does. Natsukashii is one of my favorite Japanese words and I wish we had a good equivalent in English.

Does it have a different feeling than the English "nostalgic"?

To keep this vaguely on topic, I will admit that I have yet to ever buy a bottle of Kewpie mayo - something I will remedy this weekend when I again visit/bother my favorite Japanese shopkeepers.

Also, I want one of those マヨマニアTシャツ!!

You have never bought kewpie?!?! :shock:

Natsukashii is sort of a step beyond nostalgic in that it is more memory evoking. For example. If I was in the car and Wham's Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go came on the radio I would probaly squeal "natsukashiiiiiii" to who ever was in the car with me. You couldn't express these feelings in just one word in English.

Now that I have showed my age.... :huh:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I also wish we had an equivalent for Natsukashii. I just use it in English anyway in the hope that we can adopt it into our language. Best word ever.

Mayo: I'm a mayo addict. It makes EVERYTHING taste better. Only QP will do. Ajinomoto and other brands taste like a combination of paint and glue (Yes, I've eaten both).

I think the craziest combination I've tried was kimuchi, nattou and QP. It wasn't delicious, but not bad. I'd eat it again. The bad thing was that it nullified nattou's stickiness. :sad:

I'll try QP on anything, but always put it on curry, tatsuta age, bi bim ba, kimuchi fried rice or cucumber and lettuce. A little bit with zaru soba is good. It also goes well mixed with wasabi.

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I thought my husband was the only one who put mayo on curry....

zaru soba too? really?? :huh:

and welcome to eGullet tantan!

I am looking forward to hearing some more interesting food combinations, pictures too please! :biggrin:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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  • 1 month later...

Hi again, just another question...

I like kewpie mayo, but don't use it a lot seeing as it probably contains a high calorie content...Most of the time I generally use fat free miracle whip with something. I wanted to know if its possible to make some sort of crude copy of kewpie's taste without all the fat. I heard that hot mustard and rice vinegar are two main components of kewpie.

Anyone have a vague idea of what would be possible to mix with miracle whip (salad dressing) or normal mayo to get a taste similar to kewpie?

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Kewpie mayo does contain MSG ("seasonings (amino acids)", to be more precise) just like millions of other food products made in Japan, and it also contains other special ingredients like vinegar made from apple juice and malt. I don't think it's possible to imitate the flavor of that mayo without using those special ingredients.

I would suggest making tart tofu mayo and adding some MSG... What do you think?

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  • 6 months later...
The mayo kitchen restaurant lists 3 desserts:

mayo cake

mayo gelato

mayo-banana gratin

all eewws in my book!

But Kristin do you remember the rich chocolate cake recipe from Kraft in all the womens magazines that was made moist by a whole cup of Kraft Mayo?

http://www.bitegeist.com/obsessions/2006/9...the-recipe.html

Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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  • 3 weeks later...
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