Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Beef Wellington


sabg
 Share

Recommended Posts

I made Beef Wellington from a recipe in Cook's Illustrated for Thanksgiving a few years ago. It included pate de foie gras as well as mushroom duxelles. It was a hell of a lot of work but turned out really good, especially the red wine sauce that was in the same article. Man, I wanted to take a bath in that sauce...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just prepared a Beef Wellington last weekend and bunged it in the freezer for baking this coming saturday. Btw, it freezes darn well (I've done it a few times already).

I follow the Cook's Illustrated Recipe which is pretty well written. It calls for both duxelles (mushrooms) and pate. In my case, I didn't have any pate on hand so I used fresh duck foie pieces I had left over in the freezer, let it reach near room temp, put between two sheets of plastic wraps and bashed it into a longish, flatish sheet which I peeled and put on top of the filet (before rolling the duxelle over it). The idea is that the fat will melt into the duxelle and crust during the baking process.

Edited by Wimpy (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And the use of leftovers reaches a new pinnacle. Only on eGullet! :laugh:

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Absolutely. But since pork tenderloin has no fat at all, a few precautions must be taken. First, quickly sear the meat to give it a crust, but that's it. Don't place in the oven. And secondly, wrap a piece of muenster cheese around it to keep it moist. The cheese will melt away and leave no taste.

I've also made venison the same way and have used different chutneys in place of the fois gras and duxelle on occasion. Worked out fine with both meats.

Good luck and enjoy.

Rich Schulhoff

Opinions are like friends, everyone has some but what matters is how you respect them!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely. But since pork tenderloin has no fat at all, a few precautions must be taken. First, quickly sear the meat to give it a crust, but that's it. Don't place in the oven. And secondly,  wrap a piece of muenster cheese around it to keep it moist. The cheese will melt away and leave no taste.

I've also made venison the same way and have used different chutneys in place of the fois gras and duxelle on occasion. Worked out fine with both meats.

Good luck and enjoy.

Well, beef tenderloin has no fat either so it's pretty much the same principle.

PS: I am a guy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely. But since pork tenderloin has no fat at all, a few precautions must be taken. First, quickly sear the meat to give it a crust, but that's it. Don't place in the oven. And secondly,  wrap a piece of muenster cheese around it to keep it moist. The cheese will melt away and leave no taste.

I've also made venison the same way and have used different chutneys in place of the fois gras and duxelle on occasion. Worked out fine with both meats.

Good luck and enjoy.

personally i wouldn't sear it. puff pastry takes a long time to cook. if you read up on alot of recipes it'll tell you to use the biggest piece of beef tenderloin you can find to ensure that the pastry is cooked and the centre is still pink. not only that but pork tenderloin is alot smaller then beef to begin with. so you can so it but it's either have a nicely cooked pastry with over cooked meat, or under cooked party with pink meat. if you want to be unconventional you can try deep frying it. that way the pastry will cook quicker. or just roll out the pastry paper thin. but the mositure from the meat will make the pastry will go soggy

bork bork bork

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

I just helped my friend make a beef Wellington and honestly, it was only so-so. I love pate and I love steak but the two ingredients just did not incorporate well. Do you think a good idea would be to chop up the beef into bite-size pieces (1-inch cubes) and then mixing that with the pate? I'd hate to chop up a beef tenderloin so maybe this can be done with a cheaper cut of beef.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the staples in Gordon Ramsay's Hell's Kitchen was a Lamb Wellington. It used a duxelles, but no pâté. He also made a more traditional Beef Wellington on "The F Word," but again no pâté -- just duxelles. His restaurants serve Beef Wellington as well, but I don't know if they follow the same recipe.

I've never had a traditional Beef Wellington, but the combination of pâté and beef tenderloin (or any other meat) just doesn't sound too appetizing to me; too overwhelming. And you know -- spank me and call me Karl Marx -- like some over the top, bourgeois yuppie surf 'n turf extravaganza.

Whether you agree with Ramsay's approach on that count or not, there is a really cool part of his recipe that I've not seen elsewhere, that handles the same thing Louisa Chu addressed ("... layer a crepe between the puff pastry and the beef/duxelles/foie gras. This keeps the moisture contained and the puff pastry from getting soggy.")

Ramsay's recipe smears the tenderloin with mustard and the duxelles, but then wraps it in parma ham before chilling it, and finally wrapping it in the pastry. I can testify to that method's efficiency... I made a Pork Wellington, and instead of the duxelles, I used a prune mixture and wrapped it all in Prosciutto, and the pastry never got soggy.

Good luck with it -- please do report back on it! Here's Gordon Ramsay's Beef Wellington recipe from "The F Word."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BW is incumbent upon three ingrediants.

1. The beef must be Prime and should be the head of a properly trimmed tenderloin for the biggest piece, at least 2 #'s. Searing is required to give an adequate crust and barrier to the Pate. If using the head of the tenderloin, there is no problem with cooking the puff and having the beef rare. It is when using the filet that the problem occurs becuase the filet is smaller in diameter.

2. The Pate must be adequately seasoned and of high quality. Foie alone is not sufficient. Mushrooms if used must be precooked to get rid of the liquid.

3. The puff must be of high quality using unsalted butter, preferably of you own making if you know how. Commercial puff simply will not do.

BTW, most pork tenerderloin is too small for this technique.

Technique.

1. Season you beef with fresh cracked pepper and kosher salt and sear over very high temp until a crust forms. Kill the heat in a cold water bath. Dry your beef.

2. Rub your beef with cognac and smear the pate over the beef.

3. Roll in the puff and construct your Wellington. -Chill well.

4. Cook in a pre heated 425F oven until your puff browns and the internal meat temp is 100F.

5. Rest for 30 minutes at least.

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
I just prepared a Beef Wellington last weekend and bunged it in the freezer for baking this coming saturday.  Btw, it freezes darn well (I've done it a few times already).

I follow the Cook's Illustrated Recipe which is pretty well written.  It calls for both duxelles (mushrooms) and pate.  In my case, I didn't have any pate on hand so I used fresh duck foie pieces I had left over in the freezer, let it reach near room temp, put between two sheets of plastic wraps and bashed it into a longish, flatish sheet which I peeled and put on top of the filet (before rolling the duxelle over it).  The idea is that the fat will melt into the duxelle and crust during the baking process.

I would like to make Beef Wellington for Christmas Dinner, and I found this old thread. Has anyone else successfully made BW ahead and frozen it? I need to make it in advance - at least the day before - because I'm serving brunch for 10 followed by the dinner for 15 on Christmas. Anything that I can do ahead of time, is going to get done . . . .

If I make it the day before, would it be OK to merely refrigerate until dinner time? Does this affect the cooking time? I'm going to follow the CI recipe, except that I'm planning to encase the duxelle/pate mixture in proscuitto before wrapping with pastry in the hope that this will keep the filling from making the pastry soggy.

And and all advice is greatly appreciated (including any side suggestions that can be made ahead!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd like to make a beef wellington using port tenerloin.  Is this a simple substitutio or are ther adaptations I should be aware of?  Thanks in advance.

I made a cajun wellington (or should it be Wellitoux?) one year at Christmas.

I made a crawfish/tasso paste to sub for the pate. It came out great! Give it a shot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the staples in Gordon Ramsay's Hell's Kitchen was a Lamb Wellington. It used a duxelles, but no pâté. He also made a more traditional Beef Wellington on "The F Word," but again no pâté -- just duxelles. His restaurants serve Beef Wellington as well, but I don't know if they follow the same recipe.

I've never had a traditional Beef Wellington, but the combination of pâté and beef tenderloin (or any other meat) just doesn't sound too appetizing to me; too overwhelming. And you know -- spank me and call me Karl Marx -- like some over the top, bourgeois yuppie surf 'n turf extravaganza.

Whether you agree with Ramsay's approach on that count or not, there is a really cool part of his recipe that I've not seen elsewhere, that handles the same thing Louisa Chu addressed ("... layer a crepe between the puff pastry and the beef/duxelles/foie gras. This keeps the moisture contained and the puff pastry from getting soggy.")

Ramsay's recipe smears the tenderloin with mustard and the duxelles, but then wraps it in parma ham before chilling it, and finally wrapping it in the pastry. I can testify to that method's efficiency... I made a Pork Wellington, and instead of the duxelles, I used a prune mixture and wrapped it all in Prosciutto, and the pastry never got soggy.

Good luck with it -- please do report back on it! Here's Gordon Ramsay's Beef Wellington recipe from "The F Word."

You can also find that recipe in the Cook's Book, in the chapter on meat written by Marcus Waring, Ramsey's eternal sous chef (now running his own resturant in Ramseys empire). Really good book, BTW.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would like to make Beef Wellington for Christmas Dinner, and I found this old thread.  Has anyone else successfully made BW ahead and frozen it?  I need to make it in advance - at least the day before - because I'm serving brunch for 10 followed by the dinner for 15 on Christmas.  Anything that I can do ahead of time, is going to get done . . . .

If I make it the day before, would it be OK to merely refrigerate until dinner time?  Does this affect the cooking time?  I'm going to follow the CI recipe, except that I'm planning to encase the duxelle/pate mixture in proscuitto before wrapping with pastry in the hope that this will keep the filling from making the pastry soggy.

And and all advice is greatly appreciated (including any side suggestions that can be made ahead!)

If you make it the day before just refrigerating it is fine. If you make it farther ahead and freeze it put it back into the refrigerator 24 hours in advance so it defrosts fully before cooking.

I've made it ahead and both refrigerated and frozen it prior to cooking. In my opinion refrigeration for 24 hours does not affect the flavor or texture in all, freezing seems to make the pastry a little tougher. If you have any concerns just make the test batch ahead to see what results you get.

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you make it the day before just refrigerating it is fine.  If you make it farther ahead and freeze it put it back into the refrigerator 24 hours in advance so it defrosts fully before cooking.

I've made it ahead and both refrigerated and frozen it prior to cooking.  In my opinion refrigeration for 24 hours does not affect the flavor or texture in all, freezing seems to make the pastry a little tougher.  If you have any concerns just make the test batch ahead to see what results you get.

Thank you! I am actually going to do a test run tomorrow. I've never made BW before, so I don't want to experiment on the 16 people that are coming for xmas dinner. :blink:

I'm also curious about the proper temperature for the initial roasting. Most recipes say to cook the beef to 120 F, then chill, wrap, etc. and proceed with the final roasting. I'm worried that pre-cookinig the tenderloin to 120 F will result in an overdone final result. The majority of these guests like their meat extremely rare - as in a maximum of 125 F. I'm thinking of cooking only to 110 F, then chilling and proceeding. Any thoughts here?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you!  I am actually going to do a test run tomorrow.  I've never made BW before, so I don't want to experiment on the 16 people that are coming for xmas dinner.  :blink:

I'm also curious about the proper temperature for the initial roasting.  Most recipes say to cook the beef to 120 F, then chill, wrap, etc. and proceed with the final roasting.  I'm worried that pre-cookinig the tenderloin to 120 F will result in an overdone final result.  The majority of these guests like their meat extremely rare - as in a maximum of 125 F.  I'm thinking of cooking only to 110 F, then chilling and proceeding.  Any thoughts here?

I certainly agree, I never pre-cook the meat higher than 110-115 F. And my final target is 130-135 F, based on that I would target 110 or maybe a little less for your pre-cooking. Of course the size of the piece of meat affects the temperature significantly too as does how long after its removal from refrigerator the meat is cooked.

Good luck and your test, hope it goes well!

I've learned that artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the result of my test run. I followed Gordon Ramsey's recipe (as shown on YouTube.com). My tasters decreed that it was a success - although I thought that the pastry could have been a bit more crispy. Also, I will reduce the salt a bit when I prepare this for xmas dinner.

gallery_51874_4687_423233.jpg

gallery_51874_4687_837071.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

kbjesq: That looks absolutely delightful! LOVE LOVE the golden brown of that particular corner hehe.

I've actually never eaten Beef Wellington before but your creation is realllyyy tempting me to!

I shall look up the recipe on youtube.

Did you find it difficult? Or easy peasy?

Musings and Morsels - a film and food blog

http://musingsandmorsels.weebly.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By dcarch
      Happy Bastille Day!
       
      As I was thinking of cooking something appropriate for today and have the music playing in the background. 
      I thought the lyrics of the France National Anthem can be slightly modified and used against the covid-19 tyranny. 
       
      I did make crepe for breakfast, but have not decided what to make for dinner. May be I will make something for tomorrow.
       
      Anyone have ideas?
       
      dcarch
       
       
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By bleudauvergne
      Clafoutis de Fevettes au Parmesean et Basilic
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      This recipe appears in French in issue no. 140 of the Saveurs magazine as part of a series of recipes accompanying an article on 'primeurs', or local vegetables that appear at the markets only during the first few weeks of Spring.
      It can be prepared with feves that have been frozen fresh, but I would not recommend using dried beans.
      This recipe should work fine with both American all purpose and French type 55 flour, as the quantity called for is slight in comparison to the other ingredients.

      500 g fresh young feves
      4 eggs
      20 cl milk
      10 cl heavy cream (liquid)
      70 g freshly grated parmesean
      2 T flour
      1 small bouquet of basil
      1/2 tsp salt
      1/4 tsp grated nutmeg
      fresh ground white pepper

      Preheat your oven to 160 C / 320 F.
      Blanche the feves a large pot of boiling salted water and refresh in cold water. Drain and reserve.
      Combine the eggs, the milk and cream in a large bowl and beat until well combined.
      Wash and dry the basil, remove the leaves from the stems and mince it finely.
      Add the salt, the flour, the parmesean, the pepper, the grated nutmeg, and the freshly minced basil. Add the young feves.
      Butter a clafoutis dish (noted in the recipe as 'un plat a clafoutis', but which a deep sided 10" square dish such as a corningwear would work, or a large loaf pan), give the batter a last mix, pour it into the pan, and put it in the pre-heated oven. Bake for approximately 35 minutes, until the top is golden brown and the center seems firm when you shake the pan.
      Serve it hot or cold, with a simple roquette salad or with chicken, rabbit, or veal. Goes well with a good rose champagne.
      Keywords: Main Dish, French, Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Easy
      ( RG1243 )
    • By Drew777
      I'm a Brit. I'm also a closet Frenchman.  To cap it all, I'm happily retired in Bangkok, the city of a street food culture that's second to none. The Thais are healthy and slim. I'm just this side of alive and far from slim. Lockdown has me fantasizing about my days working in London, Paris and New York, an existence, if one could call it that, revolving around gastronomy of one kind or another. They paid me, not so very much as it happens, to do what I enjoy doing most in life. We all get to do it, but I was one of a fortunate few who made it his metier. Well all that's in the past now, but I still dream of my time in Paris when lunch was a tad short of 2-hours, little-known local bistros remained affordable until the day they were discovered by La Bible (Michelin Guide) and the students were revolting - this was the summer of '68, for heaven's sake. Someone should open bistro here in Bangkok with a table d'hote of Soupe a l'Oignon gratinee, Blanquette de Veau, a stinky Epoisses and Tarte Tatin to finsih with creme fraiche. Ah, it's back to lockdown and pad Thai. 
    • By TexasMBA02
      After batting about .500 with my previous approach to macarons, I came across Pierre Herme's base recipe online.  After two flawless batches of macarons, I've been re-energized to continue to work at mastering them.  Specifically, I want to try more of his recipes.  My conundrum is that he has, as far as I can tell, two macaron cookbooks and I don't know which one I should get.  I can't tell if one is just an updated version of the other or a reissue or what the differences really are.  I was hoping somebody had some insight.  I have searched online and haven't seen both books referenced in the same context or contrasted at all.
       
      This one appears to be older.

       
      And this one appears to be the newer of the two.

       
      Any insight would be helpful.
       
      Thanks,
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...