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New Worlds of Beef


bourdain
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Those chefs intimidated by the high prices demanded for Wagyu (kobe hybrid) steaks might consider the fabulous (and reasonably priced) shoulder cut called "paleron" by the French--and "Flatiron, Scotch' or Chicken' steak by US. It's tasty, with a good yield--and when center tendon is removed, makes surprisingly tender and flavorful grilled or seared steaks. Usually only good for braised or stewed dishes, this flavor-packed vaguely filet shaped cut is tender as hell--due to the Wagyu's heavy rippling of fat. Price to serve one portion? About 6-7 dollars, with garnish and sides. (Compare this to the current NYC cost of serving for one 12 oz trimmed Black Angus sirloin: an appalling $18.00). Next big thing? Probably not. But the lesser, cheaper cuts of the Wagyu are clearly well worth investigating.

abourdain

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Whipped waygu fat with little bits of crispy waygu bacon folded into it.

Errr....

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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is the whipped fat cooked?

Sous vide over a long period of time, remove fat. Cut up the rest of the meat. Crisp meat in some of the reserved fat. Chill remaining fat. Whip chilled fat.

One must consider the diet of a waygu, cream and sake mash. What are the properties of cream? What can cream achieve? Custards, milkshakes, icecreams, "milks" and you get the basic idea.

Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu

Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

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Errr...

I like seared beef fat well balanced with meat or melted into the meat.

What kind of quantity for service are we talking about, invento?

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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The cheaper cuts work best. You can purchase more. Think of it as and I hate to use this word but "deconstructing" the waygu into its basic elements. The ratio of fat to meat is the fun part. if you love the oily richness of waygu, you can create it as oily or as lean as you wish. These factors will all determine the quantity used for service and the quantity desired or needed for each portion. Me personally, the increased richness is preferred. The problem with american Kobe is its not as desirable as the Japanese. So create your own, crispy is not the only option. There is a whole other spectrum of dissected techniques that can produce textures and flavors one is more familiar with. Medium rare, fork tender, etc.. But this techniqe is useful for them all. You need to play around with it. I could give you the entire answer but then you would copying and thats no fun for me or you:)

Future Food - our new television show airing 3/30 @ 9pm cst:

http://planetgreen.discovery.com/tv/future-food/

Hope you enjoy the show! Homaro Cantu

Chef/Owner of Moto Restaurant

www.motorestaurant.com

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It's tasty, with a good yield--and when center tendon is removed, makes surprisingly tender and flavorful grilled or seared steaks

I was raised eating this cut of beef. It was always prepared braised and I LOVE the connective tissue that runs through the middle. It becomes nice an gelatinous in long, moist cooking. I can see how the average diner would freak if you served a grilled or sauteed chicken steak (a/k/a chuck underblade steak) without removing the connective tissue. I agree that it does have an excellent deep beefy flavor.

South Florida

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Those chefs intimidated by the high prices demanded for Wagyu (kobe hybrid) steaks might consider the fabulous (and reasonably priced) shoulder cut called "paleron" by the French--and "Flatiron, Scotch' or Chicken' steak by US. It's tasty, with a good yield--and when center tendon is removed, makes  surprisingly tender and flavorful grilled or seared steaks. Usually only good for braised or stewed dishes, this flavor-packed vaguely filet shaped cut is tender as hell--due to the Wagyu's heavy rippling of fat.  Price to serve one portion? About 6-7 dollars, with garnish and sides. (Compare this to the current NYC cost of serving for one 12 oz trimmed Black Angus sirloin: an appalling $18.00). Next big thing? Probably not. But the lesser, cheaper cuts of the Wagyu are clearly well worth investigating.

aka 'top blade, country steak, butter steak,' etc.

Jaques & Julia did a show about this cut. Jaques cut the steak from the sinew, added a persillade and served with frites. Top job.

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  • 2 years later...

Since searching forums for past topics takes such a long time to sort through I decided to revive this thread. I've just heard recently that there are 3 areas in Japan where Wagyu are being raised, Kobe, Matsusaka, and Tamba (?) Although they are the same breed, I heard the Matsusaka farms are producing better meat. True or false? Any info or opinions on this? Maybe some Japanese members of this site can help or provide links to Wagyu farm websites. Thanks in advance.

P.S. Is it true most farms of this breed in Japan only raise about 2 or 3 animals at one time?

"One chocolate truffle is more satisfying than a dozen artificially flavored dessert cakes." Darra Goldstein, Gastronomica Journal, Spring 2005 Edition

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Since searching forums for past topics takes such a long time to sort through I decided to revive this thread. I've just heard recently that there are 3 areas in Japan where Wagyu are being raised, Kobe, Matsusaka, and Tamba (?) Although they are the same breed, I heard the Matsusaka farms are producing better meat. True or false? Any info or opinions on this? Maybe some Japanese members of this site can help or provide links to Wagyu farm websites. Thanks in advance.

P.S. Is it true most farms of this breed in Japan only raise about 2 or 3 animals at one time?

butter,

I am about to walk out the door, but take a look at this thread.

I wrote quite a bit about some of the things you are asking.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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Thank you, I knew you would come through for me. I miss Japan and Matsusaka beef.

"One chocolate truffle is more satisfying than a dozen artificially flavored dessert cakes." Darra Goldstein, Gastronomica Journal, Spring 2005 Edition

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