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Bakeware, cookware, pan stores, etc in Paris


yoshka
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I visited several bakeware shops when I was in Paris last year. My favorite was MORA at 13, Rue Montmartre in the 1st. Great selection and prices.

You might also check out Partricia Wells' "Food Lover's Guide to Paris". She has an entire chapter on kitchen and tableware shops.

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The only cookware shop I've ever bought anything in in Paris is the rather famous E. Dehillerin at 18-20 rue Coquillière also in the 1st arrondissement. It's probably a few blocks away from the shop nightscotsman recommends. Both shops are in Patricia Wells' chapter on kitchenware shops. MORA seems more geared towards baking. This area is just northwest of the Jardins des Halles. The shops in the area date from when the area was the commercial wholesale food market of Paris and you'll find several professional cooking and baking supply shops in the area. It's worth checking out both places and scouting for other shops in the area.

I almost forgot one other place and that's the Bazaar de l'Hotel de Ville across from the city hall in the 4th arrondisement. Patricia Wells recommends the Art de la Table department on the third floor. I recall that as having overdesigned stuff and shopped for real tools in the basement, but this goes back close to 40 years.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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  • 1 month later...

A cook's paradise

Since 1820, the Parisian shop E. Dehillerin has inspired awe

link to article (free but registration required to view)

For serious cooks, the mecca is a dark, tatty and jumbled corner store called E. Dehillerin, just down the street from where the venerable Les Halles produce market used to be.

Dehillerin sells cooking utensils, but to compare it to the usual American cookware shop is like comparing the Grand Canyon to a hole in the ground. Generations of smitten shoppers have stumbled over themselves trying to describe it, like one writer for the Sunday Times of London who called it "the greatest, most civilized hardware store in the world . . . utensil Valhalla . . . as beautiful and awe-inspiring as the stockroom of the Louvre."

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Yes, De Hillerin is awesome-- Last year, we got some Silpat-type cooking sheets, and Peugeot pepper mill at about 75% less than in the States-- plus the atmosphere of the place is so much fun!!

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i don't know is she's still there but the maitresse d'shoppe was a very

large woman with a voice which carried for roughly half a mile. i'm

pretty certain she was there when the store opened in 1820.

1820! it gave me chills to think of all the chefs and cooks who had

wandered through the forest of copper in 183 years. i treasure

each and every item i was able to afford--including the little plastic

bowl scraper with the distinctive blue Dehillerin label stamped upon

it. i think it was all of 2 francs but it and the other treasures are

special to use--just because of where they were purchased.

glad i looked at their website as it reminded me i'm just about

ready for a replacement duck press. :raz:

Ecce homo qui est farba

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  • 1 year later...

If I were in Paris, I would look in the area just northwest of where les Halles used to be. That's where Dehillerin, on rue Coquillière, and many of the other professional cooking supply houses are still located. I recall a discussion quite some time ago on the pastry forum about baking supply houses in France. A few excellent mail order places were mentioned with web sites, but I don't recall an address in Paris. You might well search or ask in that forum if you don't get an answer here.

Edit: I see I've been scooped while trying to check if Dehillerin had them.

Edited by Bux (log)

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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Almost exactly a year ago I found time to buy a couple of bannetons from Dehillerin in the course of our aniversary celebrations. I think it must have been relatively early in the morning.

They only had oval ones in stock, about 12"x9" (external measurements) for about 1k of dough. They cost 6.5€.

Best wishes,

Mick

Mick Hartley

The PArtisan Baker

bethesdabakers

"I can give you more pep than that store bought yeast" - Evolution Mama (don't you make a monkey out of me)

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  • 4 weeks later...

As an update to my own question...I've had a chance to shop for bannetons and the shops mentioned in the thread do have them.

However, a small banneton meant for bread making is priced from 30 to 50 Euros. A lined basket meant to used as a bread basket runs around 7 or

8 Euros. Delerhin was the most expensive shop but the most informative.

Al Sharff

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  • 3 months later...

Does anyone have any suggestions on the best place/s in Paris to get good, honest, professional quality pans without having to pay an extra fancy shop/fancy brand premium? (For civilian use.) Obviously really good pans are expensive, but would rather get them from a proper caterer's type outfit, which would be more fun to visit and would have a broader range of makes/sizes etc available.

For example there are quite a lot of cooks' shops around rue Etienne Marcel/Les Halles - does anyone have experience of using any of these shops and recommend any in particular? Or would you suggest going somewhere else?

Are there any brands you particularly recommend?

Or alternatively, any tips on if/how/where one might get second hand restaurant pans?

Any advice on the matter would be really pantastic.

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Does anyone have any suggestions on the best place/s in Paris to get good, honest, professional quality pans without having to pay an extra fancy shop/fancy brand premium?  (For civilian use.) Obviously really good pans are expensive, but would rather get them from a proper caterer's type outfit, which would be more fun to visit and would have a broader range of makes/sizes etc available.

For example there are quite a lot of cooks' shops around rue Etienne Marcel/Les Halles - does anyone have experience of using any of these shops and recommend any in particular? 

My experience has almost exclusively been at places that would qualify as "extra fancy shop/fancy brand premium" - Dehillerin and A. Simon, which admittedly serve a lot of Americans but have never disappointed me. I've been in other shops in the area but have not found a second hand shop. Both of the above are well-described by P. Wells and in the Paris Gault Millau; I suspect you can get bargain places by looking at Paris Pas Cher. One place I can tout you off is IKEA where pots and pans are awful.

John Talbott

blog John Talbott's Paris

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I will second Dehillerin. We have bought many things from them in the past, try and go during the week, it seems less hectic then.

lalala

I have a relatively uninteresting life unless you like travel and food. Read more about it here.

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Cooks' shops around rue Etienne Marcel/Les Halles sell commercial cookware. I can't recall which store I preferred. I can't think of which brands to recommend. I don't pay attention to things like that. Stainless steel, heavy bottomed ones are good. There are other chefs who are picky about this or that and really into gadgets. I can see how alot of these things might help a home cook. But I worked for over 16 years traveling around with 2 knives, a chef's knife and a paring knife.

If have the time the prices are better in Lyon. I'll try to recall the little area. If you're interested.

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

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Better yet, drive to villedieu-les-poeles and go to the Mauviel factory.

Shear heaven..

lalala :wub:

I have a relatively uninteresting life unless you like travel and food. Read more about it here.

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