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JAZ

Lillet

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Can you get the vintage Lillet in the US?

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Since I have a bottle of each on hand right now, I thought I'd bring this thread back up and see if anyone has any new ideas, especially for the Lillet Rouge, which I'm enjoying but having a little trouble mixing.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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I personally love resurrecting old threads. There are many former and older eG'ers' contributions I enjoy reading and hope for their creative and continuted future participation.

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This will not strike you like me at all, but I'm going to give you my rules: Dubonnet Rouge, Lillet Blanc. 'Nuf said.

--Doc.

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...Or perhaps not, now having read the whole thread. Guess who Nurse Cocktail & I had over for "dinner" last night? Why, Chuck Taggart & Wesley Moore! And I asked Chuck if he was familiar with eGullet! I'm an eGullet piker. Chuck's an old hand! And here he was in this very thread!

Anyway, what I meant with my overly succinct rule was that Dubonnet only originally made the red. Kina Lillet ALWAYS meant the blanc (or blonde) - it's all they made until they tried to expand into Dubonnet's market. I just feel each was best at their original thing. Thus my law.

We all had no Lillet (or Dubonnet) at all this particular evening of socialization, but we surely have in the past, and especially with the famous Lillet Tomlin we are bound to in the future.

To do my own thread hijacking, our cocktail menu tonight WAS as follows: We began with a cocktail of my creation, La Tavola Rotonda. 2 oz Bourbon, 1 oz pineapple juice, 1/2 oz Campari, 1/2 oz Maraschino, 1/2 oz Torani Amer (or pre-1980 Amer Picon) 2 dashes Peychaud Bitters.

We followed with a vintage cocktail from my new book. The Blinker Cocktail. 2 oz rye whiskey, 1 oz grapefruit juice, 1 tsp raspberry syrup (or 2 barspoons).

Chuck then made US a cocktail named for some British friends of his. The Hoskins Cocktail with that famous Dale Degroff touch, the flamed orange peel. Very orangey, and delightfully so, all over. So be it. It was delicious -- and orangey!

We followed with an inpromtu cocktail. I created it with 2 oz applejack, 1 oz lemon juice, 1 oz Campari (I'm on a kick!), 1/2 oz Clement Creole Shrub, a rum-based orange liqueur from Martinique and an orange twist.

Then we cleansed our palates with some Marc. just a Port glass quantity apiece. Fabulous, not just the flavor but the scent. It was great to share it.

I should say, all this time we were gorging on amazing cheeses, breads,papaya, and aged meats. This whole narrated experience took place over several hours.

It was then dessert time. We managed that with sherry glasses of VOV Zabaglione on crushed ice.

(All this isn't about Lillet, but as we hosted the author of the Lillet Tomlin, I thought it apropos - also the same sort of spirits & cocktail sampling as you foodies might describe for food courses, eh?)

All great fun!

--Doc.

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(*POOF!*)

Mention my name three times and I, not unlike Beetlejuice, will appear (although, I hope, without snakes in my hair.)

Doc is indeed the world's most gracious host, and always turns me on to something wonderful. I've got to get a bottle of that marc!

Getting back on topic ... I'm mulling a few ideas for another Lillet-based cocktail, and shall report back after some experimentation.

Cheers!


Chuck Taggart

The Gumbo Pages, New Orleans / Los Angeles

"New Orleans food is as delicious as the less criminal forms of sin." - Mark Twain, 1884

Bia agus deoch, ceol agus craic.

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In one of those "oh damn I'm out of everything" moments last year I was driven to match Lillet and Irish whiskey, to extremely pleasant effect. The drink, which I call the "Weeski" (that's French for "whiskey," sez me), is assembled as follows:

Stir well with cracked ice:

2 oz Irish whiskey (I like Jameson's 12 or John Powers for this)

1 oz Lillet blanc

1 teaspoon Cointreau

2 dashes Fee's orange bitters

Strain into chilled cocktail glass and twist patch of thin-cut lemon peel over the top, which you may then drop in or discard as the spirit moves you.

I find the subtlety of Lillet tends to get drowned out by strong flavors, as does that of Irish whiskey; here, they complement each other.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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On a whim, I made the following for a guest this easter sunday:

1oz Smirnoff

1oz Lillet blanc

1oz Italian Lemon Soda

Mint Leaf

within minutes, all hands held one and I was out of lillet. A big hit with no name. The lemon soda needs tweaking though. Bitter lemon? Lime-Seltzer? This is destined to be my hot summer-drink.

Suggestions?


"I took the habit of asking Pierre to bring me whatever looks good today and he would bring out the most wonderful things," - bleudauvergne

foodblogs: Dining Downeast I - Dining Downeast II

Portland Food Map.com

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If you can find Meyer lemons, try adding a splash of the juice to your drink. I find the combination of Lillet and Meyer lemon juice works really well, and I imagine the mint would be a great addition.


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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I picked up a bottle of lillet (blond) tonight, because of this thread.

I think it's good cold and plain! Why mix it at all?

Oh well, I guess I'll have to try some of these fascinating mixes to find out why... :smile:

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Here in Paris, I make a “Strawberry Blonde“

it's strawberry fresh purée, Lillet blanc and a splash of strawberry flavored vodka. Served in a martini glass and garnished with a strawberry and a mint leave.

It's a very feminine drink.

oh my that sounds soo good...., my favorite Lillet cocktail is a Lillet Kir with a nice dry provencal rose and lillet blond in place of cassis, had it in Paris, they were serving it at Novelty here in Phila a couple of years ago called an Alexandra after me me me also nice with sparkling

a freind of mine is on a Lillet kick and is in search of places that serve it...annoyingly though she insists on saying it with a French accent (she is so not French) which makes me want to kick her very hard in the shins, just the other day she bemoaned that the one of the few places she could find Lee laaaay is L"ex he gone (L'hexagon)..ugh


"sometimes I comb my hair with a fork" Eloise

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On the rocks with an orange slice.

Oh yes, the orange slice is essential -- normally I prefer lemons or limes with my cocktails, but orange does something mysterious and wonderful to Lillet. The ice is best when cracked (but not crushed too fine). Mmmmm...must go to liquor store today.


Edited by katzenjammy (log)

"Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside." Mark Twain

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a freind of mine is on a Lillet kick and is in search of places that serve it...annoyingly though she insists on saying it with a French accent (she is so not French) which makes me want to kick her very hard in the shins, just the other day she bemoaned that the one of the few places she could find Lee laaaay is L"ex he gone (L'hexagon)..ugh

Um, I'm not French either but how else would you say it but that way? It's how I've always heard it pronounced even in the US.

regards,

trillium

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On a whim, I made the following for a guest this easter sunday:

1oz Smirnoff

1oz Lillet blanc

1oz Italian Lemon Soda

Mint Leaf

within minutes, all hands held one and I was out of lillet. A big hit with no name. The lemon soda needs tweaking though. Bitter lemon? Lime-Seltzer? This is destined to be my hot summer-drink.

Suggestions?

Sounds like a nice light drink...

An idea for a name struck me because the drink is light and because it blends french/russian and italian. (french and russion ballet being intertwined):

Limone Pavlova

or

Limone Bolshoi

:smile:


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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a freind of mine is on a Lillet kick and is in search of places that serve it...annoyingly though she insists on saying it with a French accent (she is so not French) which makes me want to kick her very hard in the shins, just the other day she bemoaned that the one of the few places she could find  Lee laaaay is L"ex he gone (L'hexagon)..ugh

Um, I'm not French either but how else would you say it but that way? It's how I've always heard it pronounced even in the US.

regards,

trillium

To rhyme with "skillet", I guess -- the same way many people in the UK pronounce "fillet" (steak, fish, etc.).


Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

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a freind of mine is on a Lillet kick and is in search of places that serve it...annoyingly though she insists on saying it with a French accent (she is so not French) which makes me want to kick her very hard in the shins, just the other day she bemoaned that the one of the few places she could find  Lee laaaay is L"ex he gone (L'hexagon)..ugh

Um, I'm not French either but how else would you say it but that way? It's how I've always heard it pronounced even in the US.

regards,

trillium

Dude when she says it she sound like that girl skunk that followed around PePe Le Pew...there's a way to speak a foreign word where you are paying respect to the way that word is pronounced with its mother tongue and then there is the exagerated accent which hints that perhaps English is not your first language, when in fact it is...the latter I find an annoying phenomenon amoungst the pretentious

" -Oh la la they do not serve Leeeee lay here, we should go somewhere else Non?"

vs

They don't have (phonetically) Li'lay, lets go somewhere where they do

- Its pet peeve of mine, she's not the only one


"sometimes I comb my hair with a fork" Eloise

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a freind of mine is on a Lillet kick and is in search of places that serve it...annoyingly though she insists on saying it with a French accent (she is so not French) which makes me want to kick her very hard in the shins, just the other day she bemoaned that the one of the few places she could find  Lee laaaay is L"ex he gone (L'hexagon)..ugh

Um, I'm not French either but how else would you say it but that way? It's how I've always heard it pronounced even in the US.

regards,

trillium

To rhyme with "skillet", I guess -- the same way many people in the UK pronounce "fillet" (steak, fish, etc.).

Oh jeez. If I pulled that I'd never hear the end of it from my French friends and colleagues. It's not like I even come close to pronouncing most words totally properly, I can tell by the slight smile on their faces, but still, an effort is only polite.

regards,

trillium (was asked this week by aforementioned French colleague I'd shared some terrine with if I had killed another pig yet...that made me laugh)

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We break out the Lillet when the weather gets warm, I've always been a rocks and maybe slice of orange girl, but the strawberry/mint drinks sounds wonderful, as does the rose/lillet kir.

Quick anecdote: I was in Paris alone, dining at restaurant on the Place des Vosges, and asked for a Lillet as an aperitif. The waiter seemed very puzzled, then asked how I would like it, so in my best French, I asked for it on ice. By now, I'm as puzzled as the waiter. Then he brings me a large glass of milk, on ice, as is "lait"...we both had a good laugh, but he had honestly never heard of Lillet! :laugh:

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Dude when she says it she sound like that girl skunk that followed around PePe Le Pew...there's a way to speak a foreign word where you are paying respect to the way that word is pronounced with its mother tongue and then there is the exagerated accent which hints that perhaps English is not your first language, when in fact it is...the latter I find an annoying phenomenon amoungst the pretentious

" -Oh la la they do not serve Leeeee lay here, we should go somewhere else Non?"

vs

They don't have (phonetically) Li'lay, lets go somewhere where they do

- Its pet peeve of mine, she's not the only one

Gotcha. Affectations of any sort are annoying as hell, I agree.

regards,

trillium

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Dude when she says it she sound like that girl skunk that followed around PePe Le Pew...there's a way to speak a foreign word where you are paying respect to the way that word is pronounced with its mother tongue and then there is the exagerated accent which hints that perhaps English is not your first language, when in fact it is...the latter I find an annoying phenomenon amoungst the pretentious

" -Oh la la they do not serve Leeeee lay here, we should go somewhere else Non?"

vs

They don't have (phonetically) Li'lay, lets go somewhere where they do

- Its pet peeve of mine, she's not the only one

Gotcha. Affectations of any sort are annoying as hell, I agree.

regards,

trillium

All the moreso given the fact that such affectations are usually incorrect. Anyone who called it "leeeeeee lay" would have the acceeeeeeeeent on the wrong syllaaaaaaaable.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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When I asked for it from the wine guy, he did not know what I was saying. I was going heavy on the L. He then figured it out and pronounced it like "Lily" with a little bit more "ay" at the end, and a kind of soft L. I just decided to test and see what my husband would say - I held up the near empty bottle which we have been chipping away at and asked him in a kind of demanding voice how it was pronounced. He got very nervous and recited the lily thing but when I repeated him exactly and asked if he was sure, he said maybe it was pronounced with the "L" silent, he could not be sure. :huh: On my second glass, I now wonder if this is served in Japan and how they pronounce it there.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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I've had the same bottle Limoncello and Aquavit in my freezer for five years.

Lord, girl, you needs to drink more.

Friends got me into Martini Bianco (not the light-colored dry vermouth, and definitely not the red kind!) when I was in Germany last summer but the only place I have been able to find it here is when I visit my grandmother in Florida. How does that compare wiz zee leelay blanc?

re: accents -- I find myself mispronouncing (americanizing) foreign words often to

a) not draw attention to myself

b) be understood

but lately I have been feeling like a total pussy for doing so. From now on I say, if you can say it right, damnit, say it right.

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Here in the UK there is a long-established tradition, particularly amongst the upper and highly educated classes, of pronouncing French words and place-names in an, er, special manner. Dordogne is pronounced "Door-DOIN" (the first syllable rhymes with "more", the second with "coin"). Boulogne gets a similar treatment and comes out as "Boo-LOIN". I've already noted "fillet".

Amongst lawyers (barristers especially) there is a range of words in "legal French", some of which come from mediaeval French but all of which get a special pronunciation; the only one that comes immediately to mind is "puisne", pronounced "puny", but there are many others.

To return to the topic: I love Lillet, served with ice and a twist of orange. It is common in the homes of French friends, but for some reason it is rarely offered as an aperitif in restaurants there. I don't know why, because it's a great way to start a meal.


Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

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Having started this thread, I sheepishly have to admit that I've just recently tried Lillet over ice, on its own. A really nice way to begin a meal, especially if you know the food is going to be rich and full flavored.

And I've always pronounced it "li-lay" -- short i, with the accent on the last syllable. Now I'm wondering --isn't that right?


Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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