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Food words often misused


Fat Guy
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...by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

Actually, it's "Che-Chelia", (shortened to "Che-Chi" which can be "Chickpea"or "wart", depending on where you are in Italy)...

I would agree if we were talking about modern Italian and not old Latin.

Well we must dig out those recordings of Cicero ("chickpea" or "wart" again).

Yea... I think I have a few old Cicero 78s lying around somewhere. :wink:

Seriously, though, the academic consensus (as opposed to Roman Catholic Church tradition) seems to be that Latin Cs are pronounced "k" and not "ch" as in modern Italian and RC Church Latin. But it seems we have traveled fairly off-topic with this tangent, so I'll say no more on it.

--

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Italian salsa--that's the cheap music you hear in bars around Rome, isn't it?

No.

THAT'S Brooshetta.

:wink::biggrin:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Chef.

Nero, wha?

Isn't that a food word?

Wasn't there a thread about how misused it is?

Just so you know, I get "Nero, wha?" quite often.

Noise is music. All else is food.

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You know that from talking to your friend the waiter, right?

Right. After a delicious lunch of Chicken Bruschetta Pasta, we went dancing. :rolleyes:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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A little off topic, but in the same theme - I won't mention the place because I actually like it (somewhat of a chain)...I once asked a server if the tuna on the tuna sandwich listed on the menu was cooked rare and she replied "no...all of our foods are properly cooked"...OK... :blink::wacko::wacko:

Edited by RockADS21 (log)

A.D.S.

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The words alone "fresh frozen" is a bit odd, it is an abrupt description of a process.

But it can be applied to fresh pasta that has been frozen, as opposed to dried pasta that had been frozen(Like that would happen) :wink:

Hey, my mother-in-law keeps saltines in the fridge; why not dried spaghetti in the freezer?

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Home-style cooking--As long as you include prisons and other such institutions in the definition of "home."

Rachel Ray, of TVFN's 40 Dollars a Day said on an episode yesterday enthused that the food at this particular place was "all made from scratch." she had a frittata. :blink:

frittata can't be made from scratch? :huh:

Actually, she had an omelet from Brother Juinper's right here in crusty Memphis. Omelets can be made with anything...

You made fun of her visit but now I see you watched it anyway - what's up with that?

I have to admit, i watched it too...

Bill Russell

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Happy hour.

Whats wrong w that one?

I suppose in opposition to "Sad Hour" ?? :blink:

It's also often more than an hour long, but my, what nitpickers. :biggrin:

On "brooshetta," could that be a Sicilian or Neapolitan pronunciation or something? (Though it seems more like the accent of someone from, I think, Milano or maybe Torino. I used to know a guy who often used the "sh" sound for words with "s," but I can't remember precisely which northern Italian city he was from.)

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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On "brooshetta," could that be a Sicilian or Neapolitan pronunciation or something? (Though it seems more like the accent of someone from, I think, Milano or maybe Torino. I used to know a guy who often used the "sh" sound for words with "s," but I can't remember precisely which northern Italian city he was from.)

Food Lover's Companion cites both pronunciations; someone let Holly Moore know so he/she can bust off an angry email. :biggrin:

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I can say no such thing about the current total misunderstanding, in the U.S. anyway, as to the meaning (and pronounciation) of "bruschetta."

We all seem to get that the Italian "ch" is pronounced with a hard sound when we say "Chianti" - why is it so difficult to figure that out with bruschetta?

I believe it involves the same logic which means the word 'Celtic' is pronounced 'Seltic', instead of 'Keltic'.

Actually, AFAIK, "seltic" versus "keltic" is more or less a matter of preference, with "seltic" prevailing until relatively recently. Clickety.

Interesting link, I have long ago given up being critical of USA v UK english pronouciation (except for droppin the 'H' in 'Herb', that really does suck), language is dynamic and who is to say what is 'correct', especially if incorporated a foreign word. Anyway, Celtic come from 'Keltoi', so it should be prounouced with a hard 'C'. :wink:

I gather that "seltic" is actually a UK pronunciation, as it has been said that way in English for some 400 years. I would also consider that number of years sufficient for the word to be considered an English one and subject to regular English pronunciation customs apart from its roots in another language. As the author of the linked article points out, if we are going to go by the rule that the original Greek pronunciation means it has to be "keltic" then, by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

400 years from now, I will consider it sufficient to say that "brooshetuh" is a correct pronunciation as well. :biggrin: In all seriousness, I wonder if that particular mistake is made because of the US's multi-ethic makeup and the fact that USAmericans have been more likely to see "sch" in the context of German words and pronounced as "sh" (as in "Schultz").

Actually, it's "Che-Chelia", (shortened to "Che-Chi" which can be "Chickpea"or "wart", depending on where you are in Italy) which brings us back to "brooshetuh" and serves those Italian right. :rolleyes:. I think that the English most likely said "Fucking Irish/Welsh", rather then 'seltic' or 'keltic'.

Yes, I think that your last point is correct. I pronouce my name 'Bah-lich', my brothers say 'Bal-Ich', most Anglo-Saxon types say 'Balick'. It is a problem with the English alphabet only having 26 letters, compared to the Croatia 30. People do tend to get worked up about it though.

Uh.

I've got nothing.

I just wanted more quotes within quotes posts.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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My wife once sent me to the supermarket to pick up a package of frozen Welsh Rarebit. Everyone kept telling me they did not have any Welsh "Rabbit"! To be fair the name is confusing- especially if you have never heard of it..

GoodEater

Vivo per mangiare!

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Chicken steak. But, I could be wrong here, Bux is there a US city called "Chicken"?

Yep. In Alaska (although "city" is something of an overstatement).

It was named by those insolent folks that lived in the area as a response to the better-known and more nobly-designated Alaska town called "Eagle."

:biggrin:

Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Yes you are correct- Welsh Rarebit is the cheese- milk sauce. The frozen stuff is made by Stouffer's(sp?) foods. [Just checked google on Welsh Rarebit and one site said that it could be a play on words to be a slight to the Welsh people who could not afford meat years ago.] The frozen version on Rarebit is OK but next time I will make a home-made version.

GoodEater

Vivo per mangiare!

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"a slight to the Welsh people who could not afford meat years ago"

The number of slights (and worse) against the Welsh is a long one-- "welsh" used to be used more or less as a synonym for "deadbeat."

Edited by fresco (log)
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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