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Food words often misused


Fat Guy
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I can say no such thing about the current total misunderstanding, in the U.S. anyway, as to the meaning (and pronounciation) of "bruschetta."

We all seem to get that the Italian "ch" is pronounced with a hard sound when we say "Chianti" - why is it so difficult to figure that out with bruschetta?

I believe it involves the same logic which means the word 'Celtic' is pronounced 'Seltic', instead of 'Keltic'.

Actually, AFAIK, "seltic" versus "keltic" is more or less a matter of preference, with "seltic" prevailing until relatively recently. Clickety.

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I can say no such thing about the current total misunderstanding, in the U.S. anyway, as to the meaning (and pronounciation) of "bruschetta."

We all seem to get that the Italian "ch" is pronounced with a hard sound when we say "Chianti" - why is it so difficult to figure that out with bruschetta?

I believe it involves the same logic which means the word 'Celtic' is pronounced 'Seltic', instead of 'Keltic'.

Actually, AFAIK, "seltic" versus "keltic" is more or less a matter of preference, with "seltic" prevailing until relatively recently. Clickety.

Interesting link, I have long ago given up being critical of USA v UK english pronouciation (except for droppin the 'H' in 'Herb', that really does suck), language is dynamic and who is to say what is 'correct', especially if incorporated a foreign word. Anyway, Celtic come from 'Keltoi', so it should be prounouced with a hard 'C'. :wink:

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I've always wondered about "grilled to perfection." Does this mean that your main course started out as a substantard lump of merde but was, through the talented intervention of the kitchen, made perfect?

Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"
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I can say no such thing about the current total misunderstanding, in the U.S. anyway, as to the meaning (and pronounciation) of "bruschetta."

We all seem to get that the Italian "ch" is pronounced with a hard sound when we say "Chianti" - why is it so difficult to figure that out with bruschetta?

I believe it involves the same logic which means the word 'Celtic' is pronounced 'Seltic', instead of 'Keltic'.

Actually, AFAIK, "seltic" versus "keltic" is more or less a matter of preference, with "seltic" prevailing until relatively recently. Clickety.

Interesting link, I have long ago given up being critical of USA v UK english pronouciation (except for droppin the 'H' in 'Herb', that really does suck), language is dynamic and who is to say what is 'correct', especially if incorporated a foreign word. Anyway, Celtic come from 'Keltoi', so it should be prounouced with a hard 'C'. :wink:

I gather that "seltic" is actually a UK pronunciation, as it has been said that way in English for some 400 years. I would also consider that number of years sufficient for the word to be considered an English one and subject to regular English pronunciation customs apart from its roots in another language. As the author of the linked article points out, if we are going to go by the rule that the original Greek pronunciation means it has to be "keltic" then, by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

400 years from now, I will consider it sufficient to say that "brooshetuh" is a correct pronunciation as well. :biggrin: In all seriousness, I wonder if that particular mistake is made because of the US's multi-ethic makeup and the fact that USAmericans have been more likely to see "sch" in the context of German words and pronounced as "sh" (as in "Schultz").

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I would probably pronounce Chianti with the ch sound instead of a K sound if I had never seen Silence of the lambs. And I always thought bruschetta, as in the bread, was pronounced with a ch sound. I think it's a "hooked on phonics" syndrome. When in doubt, pronounce it how it looks. Unfortunately that is usually wrong in foreign words. :biggrin:

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I can say no such thing about the current total misunderstanding, in the U.S. anyway, as to the meaning (and pronounciation) of "bruschetta."

We all seem to get that the Italian "ch" is pronounced with a hard sound when we say "Chianti" - why is it so difficult to figure that out with bruschetta?

I believe it involves the same logic which means the word 'Celtic' is pronounced 'Seltic', instead of 'Keltic'.

Actually, AFAIK, "seltic" versus "keltic" is more or less a matter of preference, with "seltic" prevailing until relatively recently. Clickety.

Interesting link, I have long ago given up being critical of USA v UK english pronouciation (except for droppin the 'H' in 'Herb', that really does suck), language is dynamic and who is to say what is 'correct', especially if incorporated a foreign word. Anyway, Celtic come from 'Keltoi', so it should be prounouced with a hard 'C'. :wink:

I gather that "seltic" is actually a UK pronunciation, as it has been said that way in English for some 400 years. I would also consider that number of years sufficient for the word to be considered an English one and subject to regular English pronunciation customs apart from its roots in another language. As the author of the linked article points out, if we are going to go by the rule that the original Greek pronunciation means it has to be "keltic" then, by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

400 years from now, I will consider it sufficient to say that "brooshetuh" is a correct pronunciation as well. :biggrin: In all seriousness, I wonder if that particular mistake is made because of the US's multi-ethic makeup and the fact that USAmericans have been more likely to see "sch" in the context of German words and pronounced as "sh" (as in "Schultz").

Actually, it's "Che-Chelia", (shortened to "Che-Chi" which can be "Chickpea"or "wart", depending on where you are in Italy) which brings us back to "brooshetuh" and serves those Italian right. :rolleyes:. I think that the English most likely said "Fucking Irish/Welsh", rather then 'seltic' or 'keltic'.

Yes, I think that your last point is correct. I pronouce my name 'Bah-lich', my brothers say 'Bal-Ich', most Anglo-Saxon types say 'Balick'. It is a problem with the English alphabet only having 26 letters, compared to the Croatia 30. People do tend to get worked up about it though.

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...by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

Actually, it's "Che-Chelia", (shortened to "Che-Chi" which can be "Chickpea"or "wart", depending on where you are in Italy)...

I would agree if we were talking about modern Italian and not old Latin.

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And I always thought bruschetta, as in the bread...

But you do know that it's bread. Which puts you way ahead of the majority of the Americans that think it's "Italian salsa." :biggrin:

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Home-style cooking--As long as you include prisons and other such institutions in the definition of "home."

Rachel Ray, of TVFN's 40 Dollars a Day said on an episode yesterday enthused that the food at this particular place was "all made from scratch." she had a frittata. :blink:

frittata can't be made from scratch? :huh:

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...by all rights, "Cecilia" should be pronounced "kekilia" as those Cs were hard in ancient Latin.

Actually, it's "Che-Chelia", (shortened to "Che-Chi" which can be "Chickpea"or "wart", depending on where you are in Italy)...

I would agree if we were talking about modern Italian and not old Latin.

Well we must dig out those recordings of Cicero ("chickpea" or "wart" again).

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Home-style cooking--As long as you include prisons and other such institutions in the definition of "home."

Rachel Ray, of TVFN's 40 Dollars a Day said on an episode yesterday enthused that the food at this particular place was "all made from scratch." she had a frittata. :blink:

frittata can't be made from scratch? :huh:

i guess my point wasn't clear. how else would you make a frittata???

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Often, restaurant frittatas are made from pasteurized eggs poured out of a carton.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Home-style cooking--As long as you include prisons and other such institutions in the definition of "home."

Rachel Ray, of TVFN's 40 Dollars a Day said on an episode yesterday enthused that the food at this particular place was "all made from scratch." she had a frittata. :blink:

frittata can't be made from scratch? :huh:

Actually, she had an omelet from Brother Juinper's right here in crusty Memphis. Omelets can be made with anything...

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Happy hour.

Whats wrong w that one?

Awbrig, you are hereby appointed as ambassador to Happy Hour.

You get to make me believe there's nothing wrong with it.

Noise is music. All else is food.

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